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  • ventricular
  • You should not use digoxin if you have ventricular fibrillation (a heart rhythm disorder of the ventricles, or lower chambers of the heart that allow blood to flow out of the heart). (drugs.com)
  • Treatment of these patients with digoxin leads to greater slowing of conduction in the atrioventricular node than in accessory pathways, and the risks of rapid ventricular response leading to ventricular fibrillation are thereby increased. (wikidoc.org)
  • The Prospective Randomized study Of Ventricular failure and the Efficacy of Digoxin (PROVED) trial assessed the effect of digoxin withdrawal in patients with mild to moderate congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm, and the Randomized Assessment of Digoxin on Inhibitors of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (RADIANCE) study had the same design and patient characteristics with the exception of patients being on concomitant ACEi therapy. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • The results published in 1997 revealed that after 3 years of follow up, when digoxin was added to an ACEi-based protocol for symptomatic congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm with left ventricular ejection fraction below 45%, there was no statistically significant mortality differences between treatment and control group but hospitalization for worsening heart failure and all-cause hospitalizations were significantly diminished in the digoxin group. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Digoxin is useful in the control of SVT, especially for slowing the ventricular rate in AF and in associated CCF. (southend.nhs.uk)
  • Digoxin may cause sinus bradycardia, heart block and ventricular arrhythmias, and interacts with a host of other medications among them amiodarone, propafenone (Rythmol), flecainide (Tambocor), tetracycline, calcium channel blockers, and St. John's wort. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • found digoxin
  • The recent study that found digoxin increases mortality used an approach called "time-varying treatment," where patients who continued to receive digoxin over 3.4 years as part of the follow-up to AFFIRM were compared to those who did not. (redorbit.com)
  • As if this is not enough, researchers have also found digoxin can cause visual problems even at dosages normally considered safe, and may significantly aggravate asthma symptoms[2, (yourhealthbase.com)
  • inhibits
  • Digoxin inhibits sodium-potassium ATPase, an enzyme that regulates the quantity of sodium and potassium inside cells. (nih.gov)
  • Digoxin inhibits the Na + ,K + ATP (sodium pump) and its main properties are the ability to increase the force and velocity of myocardial contraction. (southend.nhs.uk)
  • Digoxin inhibits the Na+/K+ ATPase, which indirectly raises intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus increasing the force of contractility in cardiac myocytes (heart cells). (yourhealthbase.com)
  • Digitek
  • Veterinarians who use the human drug Digitek (digoxin tablets, USP, all strengths) to treat their patients should be aware that a Class I recall has been issued because of the possibility the tablet strength may be doubled. (avma.org)
  • Drugs
  • PGP Inducers/Inhibitors: Drugs that induce or inhibit PGP have the potential to alter digoxin pharmacokinetics. (nih.gov)
  • Digoxin has potentially dangerous interactions with verapamil, and amiodarone, and a number of other commonly prescribed drugs. (medhelp.org)
  • Certain drugs interact so badly that they should not usually be given to someone taking digoxin. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • There is wide ranging clinical response for a given digoxin concentration and routine monitoring in patients on long- term therapy has little relevance unless renal function is changing or interacting drugs (e.g. quinidine or verapamil) are added or withdrawn. (southend.nhs.uk)
  • The association did not change when adjusted for age, hormone replacement therapy, other drugs, medical history (reason for prescribing digoxin), and mammography exposure. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • With careful observation, many of the numerous digoxin interactions with other drugs can be controlled or avoided. (livestrong.com)
  • Similar interactions between digoxin and other drugs that affect stomach emptying and acidity (like cholestyramine) are also likely. (livestrong.com)
  • heart
  • Digoxin is a drug used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Digoxin also helps control the heart rate and abnormal heart rhythms known as arrhythmias . (labtestsonline.org)
  • Digoxin (dye-JOX-in) is used to improve the strength (contraction) of the heart. (upmc.com)
  • Digoxin is used primarily to improve the pumping ability of the heart in congestive heart failure (CHF). (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • Digitalis was used as an herbal medicine to treat some heart conditions before the drug digoxin was available. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • Toward the end of last year her oncologist decided to drop the strength of her bisoprolol and add digoxin in the mix as she feels it's a safer option, despite it having been the heart specialist who had put her on the bisoprolol. (drugs.com)
  • Digoxin is a digitalis heart medicine that to this day is derived from the leaves of a plant related to foxglove. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Digoxin works partly by increasing the pumping power of the heart. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Milnacipran ( Savella ), used to treat fibromyalgia, can increase the risk of dizziness and fainting and irregular heart rhythms in conjunction with digoxin. (peoplespharmacy.com)
  • Digoxin helps make the heart beat stronger and with a more regular rhythm. (drugs.com)
  • The benefit of treating heart problems with digoxin may outweigh any risks to the baby. (drugs.com)
  • Digoxin injection is given in combination with a diuretic (water pill) and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor to treat heart failure in adults and children. (drugs.com)
  • Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of digoxin injection in children with heart failure. (drugs.com)
  • More recently digoxin has been vanishing from our heart failure treatment protocols. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • For example, in the SOLVD study of enalapril done in the late 1980s and published in 1991 about 67% of participants were concomitantly on digoxin compared to 27% in Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) and 22% in Systolic Heart Failure Treatment (SHIFT), which were recently completed. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Older patients with AF also often have heart failure, and digoxin is approved to treat both conditions. (redorbit.com)
  • Heart failure is the only other condition for which digoxin is used, so many of the patients who continued digoxin in the AF clinical trial also had heart failure," said Ali Ahmed, M.D., professor in the divisions of Gerontology, Geriatrics, & Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease within the School of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), and the new study's senior author. (redorbit.com)
  • They worried that the perception that digoxin increases mortality in AF might gain traction and extend to the treatment of heart failure. (redorbit.com)
  • Ahmed recently demonstrated that digoxin could reduce by 34 percent the chances that heart failure patients will be admitted to the hospital within 30 days of first taking it. (redorbit.com)
  • Digoxin is considered the most widely used cardiac medicine for heart failure and irregular heart rhythm problems (ASHP 2001). (livestrong.com)
  • Without treatment, digoxin toxicity may lead to heart failure and low blood pressure emergencies. (livestrong.com)
  • High calcium levels can ultimately affect body fluid levels and heart function as well, so a thiazide drug interaction with digoxin warrants observation of calcium levels. (livestrong.com)
  • Patients who took digoxin also had a 35 percent increase in deaths from cardiovascular causes, and a 61 percent increase in deaths from arrhythmias, or problems with heart rate. (wibw.com)
  • The tablets are being recalled because they may differ in size and therefore could have more or less of the active ingredient, digoxin, a drug product used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythms. (drugs.com)
  • Digoxin lowers the heart rate and helps bring it under control. (harvard.edu)
  • Digoxin is a medicine that is used to treat heart failure or arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms). (drugs.com)
  • Digoxin is a beta blocker drug used to treat heart problems, such as heart failure, high blood pressure. (thermofisher.com)
  • 0.125 mg
  • Posted 04/01/Caraco Pharmaceutical Laboratories and FDA notified healthcare professionals of a consumer-level recall of Caraco brand Digoxin, USP, 0.125 mg, and Digoxin, USP, 0.25 mg, distributed prior to March 31, 2009, which are not expired and are within the expiration date of September, 2011. (drugs.com)
  • tablets
  • The tablets are being recalled because they may differ in size and therefore could have more or less of the active ingredient, digoxin. (drugs.com)
  • The relationship between the digoxin elimination parameter (A%) and creatinine clearance (CL Cr ) was determined, from blood level data of 160 hospital patients receiving digoxin tablets. (springer.com)
  • antibody
  • The following antibody was used in this experiment: Digoxin Monoclonal Antibody (3301) from Thermo Fisher Scientific, catalog # MA1-27301, RRID AB_780282. (thermofisher.com)
  • drug
  • Digoxin levels must be monitored because the drug has a narrow safety range. (labtestsonline.org)
  • A digoxin test is used to monitor the concentration of the drug in the blood. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Digoxin is an old drug, perhaps ancient by some standards. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Comparatively little is written and published about digoxin today, arguably an indication of interest in the drug. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • We need to remember that although digoxin has been used for over two centuries, it was approved by the FDA in the late 1999s under its strict guidelines for new drug approval based on its safety and efficacy data from multiple randomized clinical trials. (redorbit.com)
  • So, we are not talking about a new or unsafe drug when we talk about digoxin. (redorbit.com)
  • This latest finding implicating digoxin in breast cancer further adds to the evidence that this drug is a bad actor indeed and should never be used by lone afibbers. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • Digoxin poisoning is a leading cause of hospital admissions with anywhere between 10 and 30% of patients on the drug being hospitalized for digoxin intoxication. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • Digitalis is the source of the cardiac drug digoxin. (livestrong.com)
  • In a 15-year study reported in the Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Journal in October 2009, which observed use of these macrolide antibiotics with digoxin, drug interaction and toxicity (identified by hospital admission) were greatly associated with clarithromycin use. (livestrong.com)
  • increases
  • In high doses, digoxin increases sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system (CNS). (nih.gov)
  • American and Danish researchers report that digoxin increases the risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • The researchers conclude that digoxin treatment increases the risk of invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal women and that this risk increases with increasing duration of treatment. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • doses
  • Comparisons of the systemic availability and equivalent doses for preparations of digoxin are shown in Table 1. (nih.gov)