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  • regressions
  • Benhabib and Spiegel [ 16 ] use cross-country estimates of physical and human capital stocks as indicators and run the growth accounting regressions implied by a Cobb-Douglas production function. (hindawi.com)
  • Local data on the exact timing of initiation and improvement of water services (piped water, sewers, filtration, chlorination) makes it possible to construct differences-in-differences regressions on key interventions, simultaneously including time/trend controls and other city-level controls (population, public services, etc. (helsinki.fi)
  • evidence
  • Sex differences in survival of anthropoid primates provide useful evidence: the sex that mainly provides care to offspring tends to have the higher life expectancy ( 18 ). (pnas.org)
  • global capital
  • For all the proliferation of issuers, this still leaves the bulk of humanity discriminated against, since access to the massive flows of global capital is limited to the few. (storicamente.org)
  • Perhaps another reason for their rhapsodies about the world order is that with the ascendancy of global capital there has been a homogenisation of ruling cultures like never before. (radicalnotes.org)
  • Just a little cautious look at what is happening around shows up the claims of a global order for what it is - a part of the ideological apparatus of global capital. (radicalnotes.org)
  • The various versions of this vision reinforce the feeling of inevitability of the order of global capital that has percolated all the capillaries of our existence. (radicalnotes.org)
  • This is not to ridicule the integrity of the man, but to highlight the fact that the leftists have also quietly conceded the inevitability of the triumph of global capital and hence of the need to think of strategies of coexistence and compromise rather than of counter hegemonic practice and confrontation. (radicalnotes.org)
  • resources
  • Farmers were resource-constrained with differences in access to resources. (lrrd.org)
  • These sources include not only such material forms as natural resources and reproducible producer and consumer goods and commodities but also such human forms as the inherited and acquired abilities of producers and consumers. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In the wake of these patterns, rebuilding from disasters has been devastating to poor countries, as losses consume vast amounts of limited available capital, significantly reducing resources for new investment. (nap.edu)
  • country
  • The philosopher-economist Adam Smith boldly included all useful abilities of the inhabitants of a country, whether inherited or acquired, as part of capital. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Neither do country differences in socioeconomic inheritance seem to reflect the institutional differences between them. (utu.fi)
  • Moreover, we expect that there are country differences in the way that resource compensation occurs. (utu.fi)
  • international
  • Money is not simply issued by governments or even by the banks: a dispersed global network of financial institutions and actors of various kinds have lately joined the process of its creation in the form of a plethora of credit instruments whose global circulation (commonly known as 'the markets') now vastly exceeds - or at least it did until recently - the use of money to finance international trade. (storicamente.org)
  • Hisrich & Konecnik's (2007) international human capital model is still incomplete. (scribd.com)
  • International Factor Price Differences: Leontief Was Right! (repec.org)
  • Trade barriers, war, state control of education, and a host of other interventions retard the international division of labor, reduce stocks of human capital, and lower the marginal product of labor, all of which reduce the scale and scope economies that favor large-scale production. (blogspot.com)
  • firms
  • According to him, technology is a product acquired by these types of firms by means of "learning by doing" process. (hindawi.com)
  • Uhlenbruck & Shimizu (2006) found that service firms that internationalize without strong human capital are likely to be at a competitive disadvantage. (scribd.com)
  • productivity
  • They also develop a model in which the growth rate of total factor productivity depends on a nation's human capital stock level. (hindawi.com)
  • The second, which he ascribed to Arthur Lewis , is driven by structural differences within national economies - islands of modern, high productivity industry in a sea of traditional low productivity. (worldbank.org)
  • Still another is the belief that the productivity of the economy as a whole increases as rapidly as total output rises, relative to measured inputs, although the estimates of inputs fail to include many improvements in the quality of both material factors and human agents. (encyclopedia.com)
  • workers
  • The widespread use of more complex machines over this period made possible an intensification of the labour process - workers were made to work harder - but on the other hand, this required a fitter and therefore more reliable work force. (worldsocialism.org)
  • economy
  • I would have proudly stated how the investments we were making in physical capital - our steel mills, automotive plants, and highway infrastructure - had placed Ohio at the center of the U.S. economy. (clevelandfed.org)
  • belief
  • Contrary to popular belief, the NHS is not dedicated to satisfying the human need for health care, or the eradication of disease. (worldsocialism.org)
  • cultures
  • The purpose of this article is to analyze how the twin concerns of lost varietals and lost cultures are bound together in the socio-political process of standardization, and to explain some areas of resistance. (mdpi.com)
  • dark
  • ILLUSTRATION: ROBERT NEUBECKER I know that this view of the scientific process - feeling around in dark rooms, bumping into unidentifiable things, looking for barely perceptible phantoms - is contrary to that held by many people, especially by nonscientists. (columbia.edu)
  • This hyperpigmentation, or dark spots are caused by accumulation of melanin, which, is the result and effect of ethnicity and genetics. (docarzt.com)
  • Despite a beautiful and naturally dark skin tone, this very phenomenon creates the urge in women for letting their hands into artificial ways of blooming up their skin and this becomes a happy marketing strategy for capital industry. (docarzt.com)
  • long
  • The idea of capital has long had a strong materialistic bent that is evident in the dominance of material capital in economic thinking. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When most people think of science, I suspect they imagine the nearly 500-year-long systematic pursuit of knowledge that, over 14 or so generations, has uncovered more information about the universe and everything in it than all that was known in the first 5,000 years of recorded human history. (columbia.edu)
  • The textbook is 1,414 pages long and weighs in at a hefty 7.7 pounds, a little more in fact than twice the weight of a human brain. (columbia.edu)
  • Let us note in passing that one of the co-authors of the book that really sold this idea globally (becoming a global best seller in the process) has long been an icon of anti-capitalist militancy and radicalism in many circles (Negri and Hardt, 2000). (radicalnotes.org)
  • countries
  • As a consequence of panels DOLS and FMOLS models, the impact of physical capital and education expenditures on GDP in the developed countries is determined as higher than the impact in the developing countries. (hindawi.com)
  • In this respect the difference between poor and rich, backward and modern, countries is indeed great. (encyclopedia.com)
  • industry
  • The livestock industry is challenged by increasing human population land resettlement and urbanisation. (lrrd.org)
  • world
  • With the triumph of globalised capital the whole world has accepted the economic, moral and ethical supremacy of a homogeneous world order based prominently on individualism and the ethics of the market. (radicalnotes.org)
  • The global intellectuals, the diaspora or the semi diasporic elements have never been so globally mobile before - the third world intellectuals peddling their differences from the first world and the first world intellectuals peddling their sympathy and patronage are having it good like never before. (radicalnotes.org)
  • degree
  • As noted in Chapter 1 , disaster risks are products of the disaster event and the degree of vulnerability of human communities that sustain losses from the event. (nap.edu)