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  • islets
  • The third advance involved the observation that autoimmunity, not alloimmunity, could destroy transplanted islets, while the fourth was the induction of central tolerance by intrathymic inoculation of antigen. (tts.org)
  • organs transplanted
  • During the 1960s, medical researchers continued to investigate exactly why organs transplanted between widely different species fail so rapidly. (stanford.edu)
  • Organs donated from one identical twin to another are usually viable because such organs are antigenically identical, but even organs transplanted between individuals who are fairly closely matched antigenically, such as siblings, have a good chance of being rejected. (questia.com)
  • routinely
  • To help detect rejection, you should have your blood tests completed routinely as requested by your transplant center, have routine follow-up visits with your doctor, and report any symptoms you are having to your transplant center. (uillinois.edu)
  • type of transplant
  • Jonathan, a 4-year-old with a shy smile and a love of dinosaurs, is among a small number of children in the United States who have undergone a highly unusual type of transplant surgery, one that - for the few who are eligible - offers a tremendous advantage: a normal life, free from antirejection drugs, which suppress the immune system and increase the risk of infections, cancer and other problems. (nytimes.com)
  • The type of transplant needed will depend on the child's specific medical condition and the availability of a matching donor. (kidshealth.org)
  • What you can and can't do will depend on the type of transplant you had, other health problems you have, and how your body reacts to the new organ. (upmc.com)
  • recipient
  • PITTSBURGH, June 30- The world's first recipient of a transplanted baboon liver was reported improving and watching television in his room at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center today as animal-rights advocates protested outside the hospital. (nytimes.com)
  • A blood test done before the transplant to see if the potential recipient will react to the donor organ. (liveonny.org)
  • To receive a directed donation the recipient would have to be formally accepted for a transplant by a transplant center and would have to be medically compatible (blood type, size, etc.) with the donor. (liveonny.org)
  • A study conducted at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore provides the first direct evidence that cigarette smoke exposure prior to a heart transplant in either the donor, recipient, or both, accelerates the death of a transplanted heart. (healthcanal.com)
  • Hearts in which both the donor and recipient were exposed to tobacco smoke lasted just three days before the immune response began destroying the transplant. (healthcanal.com)
  • researchers
  • Dr. Thomas E. Starzl, the transplant pioneer who has led the Pittsburgh researchers in their effort to be the first to successfully break the animal-to-human species barrier, said, "It would be easy to be too enthusiastic. (nytimes.com)
  • Researchers presented results of the study at the American Transplant Congress in Chicago on Tuesday, May 2. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • So, doctors have long sought a reliable way of separating those in true need of a transplant from those who would likely fare well without one, the researchers said. (medicinenet.com)
  • Those who have that sign are at high risk for recurrence of the leukemia , and need a transplant, the researchers explained. (medicinenet.com)
  • But some medical researchers persevered, and in 1954 Joseph E. Murray and his colleagues at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston performed the first truly successful kidney transplant. (stanford.edu)
  • Donors
  • Eight years later, the team performed the first matched transplant from an unrelated donor, a success that led to the formation of a national registry that now includes more than 11 million marrow donors. (nytimes.com)
  • For each patient receiving the transplant there must be at least two donors. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • Subsequently, Murray and others were able to transplant kidneys from more distantly related siblings and, finally, from unrelated donors, by administering drugs to suppress the recipient's innate immune response. (stanford.edu)
  • Cancer
  • Laura, 20, received a liver transplant at the age of 2, more than a year after doctors discovered she had tyrosinemia, a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot effectively break down the amino acid tyrosine, inhibiting proper development and possibly leading to liver and kidney failure, nervous system problems and an increased risk of liver cancer. (oakridger.com)
  • including treatment of infectious disease, cancer, transplanted organ rejection, autoimmune diseases and for use as antitoxins," wrote James Robl of Hematech . (whyfiles.org)
  • solid organ
  • Expanded and updated to reflect today's thinking, this brand-new edition offers crucial, real-life direction on the science and skills required for every kind of solid organ transplant - from initial evaluation to long-term follow-up. (multibriefs.com)