Loading...
  • Polyketide
  • citation needed] PKSs can be classified into three groups: Type I polyketide synthases are large, highly modular proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type II polyketide synthases are aggregates of monofunctional proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type one synthases involve large multidomain proteins containing all the sites necessary for polyketide synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type two synthases contain active sites distributed among several smaller polypeptides, and type three synthases are large multi-protein complexes containing modules which have a single active site for each and every step of polyketide synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This protein collaborates with the ketosynthase (KS) domain of the same module to catalyze polyketide chain elongation, and subsequently engages with the KS domain of the next module to facilitate forward chain transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some bacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis as well as mammals and yeast use a type I synthase which is a large multifunctional protein similar to the synthase used for polyketide synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both fatty acid synthesis and polyketide synthesis these CoA carriers will be exchanged for ACP before they are incorporated into the growing molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthase
  • Biotin is covalently attached to biotin-dependent carboxylase by biotin protein ligase, also known as holocarboxylase synthase in mammals, to form an active holocarboxylase. (genome.jp)
  • genes
  • Type II FASs are dissociated systems, meaning the component enzymes are independent proteins encoded by a series of separate genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Humans express the following two aconitase isozymes: Click on genes, proteins and metabolites below to link to respective articles. (wikipedia.org)
  • annotation
  • p>An evidence describes the source of an annotation, e.g. an experiment that has been published in the scientific literature, an orthologous protein, a record from another database, etc. (uniprot.org)
  • be used as a measure of the accuracy of the annotation as we cannot define the 'correct annotation' for any given protein. (uniprot.org)
  • Characterization
  • Functional characterization of heat-shock protein 90 from Oryza sativa and crystal structure of its N-terminal domain. (nih.gov)
  • Characterization of rice small heat shock proteins targeted to different cellular organelles. (nih.gov)
  • Expression
  • Expression of IRE-BP in cultured cells has revealed that the protein functions either as an active aconitase, when cells are iron-replete, or as an active RNA-binding protein, when cells are iron-depleted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cytoplasm
  • In wild-type cells, macromolecules in the nucleus with the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) can be transported to the cytoplasm by binding to a karyopherin protein called chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)/exportin 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Domain
  • First Structural View of a Peptide Interacting with the Nucleotide Binding Domain of Heat Shock Protein 90. (nih.gov)
  • names
  • section provides an exhaustive list of all names of the protein, from commonly used to obsolete, to allow unambiguous identification of a protein. (uniprot.org)
  • different
  • p>When browsing through different UniProt proteins, you can use the 'basket' to save them, so that you can back to find or analyse them later. (uniprot.org)
  • Small
  • Dodecameric structure of a small heat shock protein from Mycobacterium marinum M. (nih.gov)
  • synthesis
  • This was conducted during post-exponential and stationary phases of growth so as to understand its adaptation over time by utilizing differential protein synthesis. (usf.edu)
  • This causes rapid depolarization, resulting in a loss of membrane potential leading to inhibition of protein, DNA, and RNA synthesis, which results in bacterial cell death. (wikipedia.org)
  • amino
  • Background Cardiac stress may trigger production of the 40\kDa peptide fragment produced from the amino terminus from the cardiac myosin\binding protein C. function, cell viability, hypertrophy, or possibility of success. (biomasswars.com)
  • The development of moonlighting proteins may be evolutionarily favorable to the organism since a single protein can do the job of multiple proteins conserving amino acids and energy required to synthesize these proteins. (wikipedia.org)
  • NADP
  • NAD + , NADP + , yeast extract, and molecular-weight marker-proteins for gel filtration were from Oriental Yeast (Tokyo, Japan). (hindawi.com)
  • enzymes
  • The most common primary function of moonlighting proteins is enzymatic catalysis, but these enzymes have acquired secondary non-enzymatic roles. (wikipedia.org)
  • These proteins, when expressed at low levels in many tissues function as enzymes, but when expressed at high levels in eye tissue, become densely packed and thus form lenses. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first observation of a moonlighting protein was made in the late 1980s by Joram Piatigorsky and Graeme Wistow during their research on crystallin enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of the currently known moonlighting proteins are evolutionarily derived from highly conserved enzymes, also called ancient enzymes. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibodies
  • After preventing, the focus on protein had been probed with principal antibodies (anti-BTG2, anti-phospho-PI3T Tyr607, anti-PI3T, anti-phospho-AKT Ser473, anti-AKT or GAPDH) (Santa claus Cruz Biotechnology, Santa claus Cruz, California, USA) right away at 4C. (biomasswars.com)
  • chromosome
  • In wild-type cells, macromolecules in the nucleus with the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) can be transported to the cytoplasm by binding to a karyopherin protein called chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1)/exportin 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • Furthermore, sequence or structure homology of a protein may be used to infer both primary function as well as secondary moonlighting functions of a protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daidzein and other isoflavones are produced in plants through the phenylpropanoid pathway of secondary metabolism and are used as signal carriers, and defense responses to pathogenic attacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • hence
  • The phrase "gene sharing" is ambiguous since it is also used to describe horizontal gene transfer, hence the phrase "protein moonlighting" has become the preferred description for proteins with more than one function. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • In the post-genomic era, proteomic studies analyzing the protein complement of a genome in a particular organism at any given time, have gained real significance. (usf.edu)
  • bacterial
  • Pneumolysin (PLY), an associate from the category of Gram-positive bacterial, cholesterol-dependent, -barrel pore-forming cytolysins, may be the main proteins virulence aspect from the dangerous respiratory pathogen, (pneumococcus). (biomasswars.com)
  • function
  • Protein moonlighting (or gene sharing) is a phenomenon by which a protein can perform more than one function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ancestral moonlighting proteins originally possessed a single function but through evolution, acquired additional functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also different from multifunctionality of the protein, in which the protein has multiple domains, each serving a different function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein moonlighting by gene sharing means that a gene may acquire and maintain a second function without gene duplication and without loss of the primary function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The detection of a protein in unexpected locations within cells, cell types, or tissues may suggest that a protein has a moonlighting function. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively a single gene can acquire a second function since the active site of the encoded protein typically is small compared to the overall size of the protein leaving considerable room to accommodate a second functional site. (wikipedia.org)
  • alterations
  • This result is largely due to dynamic changes in protein expression profiles which can lead wide alterations in physiology and behavior. (usf.edu)
  • found
  • We found agr-regulated proteins are generally upregulated in CA-MRSA strains USA300 and USA400 and surface-associated proteins to be upregulated in HA-MRSA strains USA100 and USA200. (usf.edu)
  • It is found in all proteins and in some artificial sweeteners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daidzein can be found in food such as soybeans and soy products like tofu and textured vegetable protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Products
  • While even the best air purifier cannot efficiently capture Radon gas directly, a high quality HEPA air cleaner will efficiently capture tiny dust particles which can act as carriers for the Radon decay products. (home-air-purifier-expert.com)
  • description
  • Originally Piatigorsky called these proteins "gene sharing" proteins, but the colloquial description moonlighting was subsequently applied to proteins by Constance Jeffery in 1999 to draw a similarity between multitasking proteins and people who work two jobs. (wikipedia.org)
  • necessary
  • For proteomics, it is necessary to maximize protein concentration and to devise a method that can be easily employed and provide reproducible results. (usf.edu)
  • Levels
  • Phenylalanine (PHE) is present in all protein containing foods, and individuals with PKU will have elevated levels of PHE. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Levels of PHE should be monitored on a monthly basis throughout life to monitor degree of protein and PHE restriction and to avoid over-restriction that would contribute to poor growth and development from malnourishment. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • cells
  • Western blot For Western blot analysis, the healthy proteins had been removed from tissue and cells using RIPA lysis stream (Beyotime, Nantong, China). (biomasswars.com)
  • individual
  • Both parents of an individual with PKU are carriers and do not manifest any symptoms of disease. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Most often, the parents of an individual with an autosomal recessive disorder are carriers of one copy of the altered gene but do not show signs and symptoms of the disorder. (wikipedia.org)