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  • organs
  • Blastocysts contain stem cells that can be used to generate replacement tissues and, perhaps, one day, whole organs. (itsbetterdownthepub.com)
  • They are master cells, capable of morphing into cells in the brain, muscles, or other organs, and which might be used for medical treatment. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • In the May 13 Guest Column, "The medical solution we've been waiting for," a seventh grade student lauded the benefits of human cloning for the purpose of providing our personal supply of spare organs for transplants, and as a resource for cells, to treat disease without the complication of rejection. (willistonobserver.com)
  • These technologies allow new cells and organs to be custom-made for the recipient from his or her own cells. (sens.org)
  • Human cloning techniques, for whatever purposes, whether legal or not, are unlikely to become a routine part of mainstream healthcare, even in the still public systems of Western Europe or the privatised ones of the United States and even if the current predominant claim of 'benefits' - creating in the laboratory body-compatible cells to replace failing cells or organs - are ever realised and safety concerns (such as tumours) allayed. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • In cell therapy the diseased cells are replaced by healthy stem cells, which is similar to organ transplants in which the diseased organ is replaced by healthy organs. (medindia.net)
  • researchers
  • Researchers said Wednesday they were hopeful that the rabbit work would lead to a new and plentiful source of embryonic stem cells for research and, eventually, for medical use. (sfgate.com)
  • Austrian researchers have successfully treated stress induced incontinence in women using muscle-derived stem cells taken from the arm of the patient. (icr.org)
  • Cibelli worked with researchers in Chile to extract the RNA from the unfertilized eggs soon after they were harvested. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The researchers hope that the same approach could be used to manufacture other types of stem cell. (bionews.org.uk)
  • A new method of producing red blood cells outside the body on a large scale has been developed by researchers at the University of Bristol. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Researchers in Japan have used stem cells from a matched donor to repair damaged heart muscle in macaque monkeys. (bionews.org.uk)
  • Using a surgical technique, the researchers introduced an experimental demyelinating injury in the spinal cord of an old mouse, creating small areas of myelin loss, and then exposed those areas to cells found the blood of a young mouse. (cellmedicine.com)
  • Now, researchers reporting in the September issue of Cell Metabolism , a Cell Press publication, have discovered a new genetic defect that can lead to the disease. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The researchers had more success with DNA from fetal cells, rather than cells from live offspring. (biologixgroup.com)
  • Ever since President George Bush banned most federal funding for most embryonic stem cell research in 2001, some states have sought to pick up the slack and so entice researchers and possible new industry. (gothamgazette.com)
  • This prevented researchers from creating more embryonic stem cell lines for research. (howstuffworks.com)
  • This ruling allows researchers to continue feeding embryonic stem cell cultures, experimenting with mice, and other research activities until this court rules, the U.S. Supreme Court weighs in, or Congress passes legislation that clarifies the issues. (howstuffworks.com)
  • In the meantime, stem cell research and the careers of stem cell researchers hang on a legal roller coaster. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Researchers have been attempting to understand how living organisms maintain homeostasis, how they recover after damage, and what mechanisms are involved in the replacement of damaged cells with healthy ones. (cellmed.ru)
  • treatments
  • 6 In addition to these treatments, bone marrow transplants have been shown to supply stem cells that regenerate cells in the liver. (icr.org)
  • The cells had been taken from the udder of a six-year-old ewe and cultured in a lab using microscopic needles, in a method first used in human fertility treatments in the 1970s. (history.com)
  • WASHINGTON (AP) - A stubborn Senate voted Wednesday to ease restrictions on federally funded embryonic stem cell research, ignoring President Bush's threat of a second veto on legislation designed to lead to new medical treatments. (rationalresponders.com)
  • blastocyst
  • And while most politicians would be hard pressed to define or spell blastocyst, these tiny bits of matter sit at the center of one of the most contentious policy disputes of our time â€" the fight over embryonic stem cell research. (gothamgazette.com)
  • Stem cells (SCs) are crucial for the cell homeosta-mass of the mammalian blastocyst give rise to all cell sis of the body, primarily because their main role is to types of the adult body. (cellmed.ru)
  • Note that the cells of the blastocyst inner mass cialized functions. (cellmed.ru)
  • However, if able proliferative potential, which allows them to the blastocyst inner cell mass is cultured ex vivo under divide many times and to be maintained as a cell pop-special conditions, it is possible to obtain so-called ulation throughout the life of the multicellular body. (cellmed.ru)
  • These cells are toti-Note, however, that ex vivo cell populations whose potent, because they can give rise to all tissues of the identity to in vivo cells has not been proved and often body if introduced into the blastocyst. (cellmed.ru)
  • For example, the cells of the inner mass of the mammalian blastocyst give rise to all cell types of the adult body. (cellmed.ru)
  • tissues
  • By definition, stem cells are capable of self-renewal and differentiating into many cell types to form tissues in humans and other organisms. (icr.org)
  • The egg can then be coaxed into growing specific kinds of tissues (e.g., insulin-producing cells or nerve cells). (itsbetterdownthepub.com)
  • In a highly sophisticated game of match, every gene in the egg that was found in other tissues was eliminated, so that only unique genes remained. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The net result is that over the course of many decades, long-lived tissues like your brain, heart, and skeletal muscles begin to progressively lose cells, and their function becomes increasingly compromised. (sens.org)
  • And the effectiveness of the body's cell-replacement and healing processes are themselves impaired by the degenerative aging process, making exercise and growth factors less and less effective even as the tissues' need for repair becomes increasingly critical. (sens.org)
  • This feature of these technique eliminates the need for others to donate cells and tissues, while also eliminating the fear of rejection. (sens.org)
  • For instance, such methods have been used to turn cells taken from the skin-like supporting tissues that knit around the heart muscle into needed heart muscle cells. (sens.org)
  • Regeneration can be done by administering stem cells or by activating the stem cells that are already present in the tissues. (medindia.net)
  • The ability of cells of the same type to give rise to different types of cells and tissues is termed pluripotency. (cellmed.ru)
  • body's
  • The body's specialized cells which are damaged or diseased cannot be replaced by natural process. (medindia.net)
  • Stem Cell Institute
  • The globally unprecedented 'egg-sharing' scheme is being run by the North-East England Stem Cell Institute (Nesci) in Newcastle, and was approved by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority in July 2006. (ivf.net)
  • Later, during a chance discussion with European colleagues, stem cell researcher George Daley of Children's Hospital Boston and the Harvard Stem Cell Institute learned that they had received samples of the cell line before the work was retracted. (scientificamerican.com)
  • implanted in a woman's
  • Opponents of the procedure point out that when a treated human egg is implanted in a woman's womb a cloned baby will be born nine months later. (itsbetterdownthepub.com)
  • The fertilized egg is then implanted in a woman's uterus where, if all goes well, it will develop into a healthy baby about nine months later. (gothamgazette.com)
  • transplantation
  • Towards that goal, we are analyzing the development of different kinds of neural cells that can be derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells in the laboratory and testing their behavior after transplantation into the injured nervous system. (umdnj.edu)
  • found in umbilical
  • 4 Multipotent stem cells are also found in umbilical cord blood and can be collected and stored at birth with no discomfort or threat to the life of the infant or mother. (icr.org)
  • genes
  • Some of those genes are responsible for the magic trick that the egg has. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This paper takes a peek at what genes are in the egg waiting to make these changes. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Cibelli's team, Arif Murat Kocabas, Pablo Ross, Zeki Beyhan and Robert Halgren, started analyzi ng the thousands of genes represented in thehuman egg to identify those which are unique to the egg. (bio-medicine.org)
  • To make a comparison that would show which genes were uniquely active in the human egg, they used RNA of all parts of the human body - exceptthat of the ovaries, where eggs are produced. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Cibelli said that the team identified 5,331 human genes that are overexpressed in the egg. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The group also compared the human egg genes with those of a mouse as well as human and mouse embryonic stem cells. (bio-medicine.org)
  • We found about one in a thousand genes that are unique to the eggs - and some of them, theydon't have a known function yet," Cibelli said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Cibelli believes some of those genes know the big secrets - such as when a cell should slow down and later become a cell that can grow into anycell of the human body. (bio-medicine.org)
  • surplus
  • In general, the IVF procedure results in a surplus of leftover eggs. (ivf.net)
  • All the donors granted informed consent for their surplus eggs to be used for this research. (bio-medicine.org)
  • So most women store surplus fertilized eggs, and today thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands, of these small spherical blastocysts remain in clinics around the country. (gothamgazette.com)
  • SCNT
  • Although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that the cells had a parthenogenetic origin, imprinting analyses support a SCNT origin of the derived human ES cells. (sciencemag.org)
  • neurons
  • Our experiments will help to define groups of microRNAs that are regulated during neurogenesis and how they work to control production of neurons or non-neuronal cells in the nervous system. (umdnj.edu)
  • Stroke and traumatic brain injury lead to cell death , characterized by a loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes within the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • fertilization
  • providing a site for fertilization and forming the chalaziferous components of the developing egg. (up.ac.za)
  • 2001
  • There was no federal money for the work until Bush announced on Aug. 9, 2001, that his administration would make it available for lines of stem cells that were in existence. (rationalresponders.com)
  • parthenogenetic
  • A series of genetic markers sprinkled throughout the cells' chromosomes show the same pattern found in parthenogenetic mice as opposed to cloned mice, according to a report published online today in the journal Cell Stem Cell . (scientificamerican.com)
  • But in contrast, pairs of matching chromosomes in parthenogenetic cells tend to match one another in the middle and differ near the ends because of a genetic mixing process called recombination. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In their paper, Daley and colleagues report that the SNPs in the Korean cell line do indeed match toward the center of the chromosomes, similar to five parthenogenetic mouse cell lines that the team created for comparison. (scientificamerican.com)