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  • behavior
  • Everyday explanations of behavior that one way or another appeal to emotions are ubiquitous and there appear almost always to be three components to them. (frontiersin.org)
  • Much as we all pay lip service to an evolutionary perspective on mind, brain, and behavior, many of us still somehow exclude emotions from this evolutionary objectivism. (frontiersin.org)
  • individual's
  • Emotions can be undesired either to the individual experiencing them, but also can be undesired to the other persons, groups of persons, organizations, sub-cultures, and civilizations such as Western civilization, which can be viewed as the emotion being subjected to the individual's or someone else's discouraging meta-emotion about the undesired emotion or can be even repressed by the meta-emotions . (wikidoc.org)
  • In particular, recent advancements in technology enable researchers to measure individual's electrodermal activity (EDA), a primary physiological measure of emotions, within a wide range of environments. (springer.com)
  • Chapter
  • This chapter tries to answer the question: What part, if any, should emotion have in making engineering decisions? (igi-global.com)
  • The chapter is, in effect, a critical examination of the view, common even among engineers, that a good engineer is not only accurate, laconic, orderly, and practical but also free of emotion. (igi-global.com)
  • Chapter 2 presents different models related to the understanding of the emotion-performance relationship and provides a review on the current state of research in this area. (docplayer.net)
  • Chapter 4 focuses on the physical performance of strength and presents the influence of different self-generated emotions on: the strength of the finger musculature, the jumping height within a counter-movement jump and throwing strength. (docplayer.net)
  • In Chapter 5, two experiments highlight the influence of self-generated emotions on the physical performance of speed. (docplayer.net)
  • Finally, Chapter 7 specifies how the research program has broadened and extended the emotion-performance relationship literature, having both theoretical and practical implications, and offering some promising avenues for future investigations. (docplayer.net)
  • 9 Theory of Challenge and Threat States in Athletes (TCTSA) Classifying, Measuring and Inducing Emotions The Impact of Discrete Emotions on Physical Aspects: Current State of Research 13 Chapter 3: Research Approach Outline of the Thesis Research Questions Addressed in Thesis Chapter 4: The Influence of Emotions on Strength Paper: The influence of self-generated emotions on physical performance. (docplayer.net)
  • recognition
  • Finally, we suggest that labeling might mediate the effectiveness of reappraisal in clinical populations with deficits in emotion recognition and ER, and discuss the clinical implications of this suggestion and future directions of research and conceptualization. (frontiersin.org)
  • Emotion recognition in children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. (semanticscholar.org)
  • positive emotions
  • However, in post hoc exploratory regressions that included self-efficacy for experience and expression of positive emotions (SEPos), SEDes predicted higher time 2 life satisfaction, but only SEPos uniquely predicted higher time 3 and time 4 life satisfaction. (springer.com)
  • processes
  • The first approach assumes that the brain has a single emotion system that is responsible for the various processes related to emotions. (scribd.com)
  • Neurophysiological and functional evidence for the centrality of emotion processes in personal-social decision making is reviewed. (semanticscholar.org)
  • cortex
  • In Paul D. MacLean 's Triune brain model, emotions are defined as the responses of the Mammalian cortex . (wikidoc.org)
  • Emotion competes with even more instinctive responses from the Reptilian cortex and the more logical, reasoning neocortex . (wikidoc.org)
  • Aristotle
  • It may be, as Aristotle noted, that emotions are accompanied by pleasure or pain (often both), but they are too complex and often too subtle to be classified on that basis alone. (britannica.com)
  • For Aristotle, having the right amount of the right emotion in the right circumstances is the key to virtuous behaviour. (britannica.com)
  • reaction
  • An emotion is a "complex reaction pattern, involving experiential, behavioral, and physiological elements, by which the individual attempts to deal with a personally significant matter of event. (wikidoc.org)
  • research
  • 3 iii Abstract The main aim in the current research program was to investigate the impact of discrete self-generated emotions on physical performance. (docplayer.net)
  • appeal
  • This distinction stems from Western philosophy specifically Cartesian dualism and modern interpretations of Stoicism , and is reflected in common phrases like appeal to emotion or your emotions have taken over . (wikidoc.org)
  • insights
  • So, we shouldn't be surprised that we haven't yet developed the right methods that will help us gain deep insights into this emotion. (brown.edu)
  • experiential
  • Like trying to describe the color red without referencing other colors or red objects, each emotion is a fundamental experiential unit that is immediately recognized but very difficult to describe. (scotthyoung.com)
  • Implications
  • This study introduces a new approach to assess travellers' emotions in natural settings, and discusses the implications of this approach within the context of designing tourism places. (springer.com)
  • study
  • This paper reports the results of a case study which tracked the emotions of two visitors to Philadelphia, USA over four days. (springer.com)
  • Emotions in segmentation: An empirical study. (springer.com)
  • For many decades mainstream science has been prejudiced against the possibility of a serious, respectable scientific study of emotions. (frontiersin.org)
  • Although we have not applied these methods to study love, we hope that they will help advance scientific understanding of emotion more generally. (brown.edu)
  • It´s a great emotion to study because it´s very important, evolutionarily, and we know a lot about fear in animals," Cunningham says. (redorbit.com)
  • You would assume that there's an agreed-upon definition of emotion, at least among those who study and write about it professionally. (psychologytoday.com)
  • anxiety
  • Results indicate that this performance is greater when recalling happiness compared with anxiety and an emotion-neutral state. (docplayer.net)
  • sensation
  • Emotion , a complex experience of consciousness , bodily sensation , and behaviour that reflects the personal significance of a thing, an event, or a state of affairs. (britannica.com)
  • phenomena
  • Although neuroscientists have studied a wide variety of phenomena that could colloquially be called "love," such as maternal care , platonic friendship , social support , romantic relationships , and even sexual intimacy , part of the confusion is that the exact definition of love is hard to pin down. (brown.edu)