• Marla Cone, writing for Environmental Health News, May 4, 2009, reports that an international group of environment health experts is warning against the growing practice of spraying the pesticide DDT in homes in malaria-plagued African and Asian countries. (answers.com)
  • DDt is a Pesticide and/or a wrestling move. (answers.com)
  • DDT is a type of pesticide, first made in the laboratory in 1873, but only found useful when Dr. Paul Muller discovered that DDT could kill insects. (answers.com)
  • DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) is a pesticide once widely used to control insects in agriculture and insects that carry diseases such as malaria. (cdc.gov)
  • South African medical researchers have reported alarming evidence of low sperm counts and other damage to the male reproductive system linked to the use of the pesticide DDT in anti-malaria spray campaigns," reported the Mercury/Independent Online (South Africa) on April 12. (foxnews.com)
  • However, the DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p- total number of NPL sites evaluated for these chlorophenyl)ethane) is a pesticide that was once substances is not known. (cdc.gov)
  • DDT was first used as a pesticide during World War II. (ehow.com)
  • For years the pesticide DDT has been a major suspect in the breast cancer epidemic. (loe.org)
  • Research shows that insects that can resist the controversial pesticide DDT have an added advantage over non-resistant insects, even when they are not being sprayed with the chemical. (scidev.net)
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today it was moving to ban the DDT-like pesticide endosulfan, a highly toxic pesticide used in orchards and fields across the country . (earthjustice.org)
  • This is terrific news for all Americans and especially for the families who live, work, and play near farms and orchards where this DDT-like pesticide is used. (earthjustice.org)
  • From 1947 to 1982, the nation's largest manufacturer of DDT - a pesticide so powerful that it poisoned birds and fish - was based in Los Angeles. (latimes.com)
  • February 14, 2019 -- Women who were exposed to high levels of the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) are at increased risk for breast cancer through age 54, but the cancer risk depends on the first exposure to the chemical compound, according to a study published February 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute . (auntminnie.com)
  • Recent research in California has revealed that DDT can cause developmental delays in infants whose mothers were exposed to the pesticide. (medindia.net)
  • People are typically exposed to DDT by coming into contact with the pesticide spray or by eating food that has been sprayed. (medindia.net)
  • It was called DDT, [4] a pesticide of un-prece-dented effectiveness. (thenewatlantis.com)
  • 2,4′-DDT is an organochlorine pesticide , which can be widely used in agriculture for crop protection and disease vector control. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • New research has revealed that exposure while in the womb to DDT, a pesticide banned in 1972 after close to 30 years of use, increases women's risk of high blood pressure decades later. (mercola.com)
  • Rachel Carson‚Äôs seminal 1962 book, "Silent Spring," told the real-life story of how bird populations across the country were suffering as a result of the widespread application of the synthetic pesticide DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), which was being used widely to control mosquitoes and others insects. (smdp.com)
  • June 12 (UPI) -- The highly potent pesticide DDT was banned more than a half-century ago, but the toxic chemical persists in lake ecosystems and continues to impact freshwater food chains, according to a new study. (upi.com)
  • To examine any possible links between exposure to DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis ( p -chlorophenyl)ethylene), the persistent metabolite of the pesticide dicophane (DDT), and breast cancer. (bmj.com)
  • Reuters Health) - The once-common pesticide DDT has long been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • DDT is a pesticide banned in the United States except in public health emergencies. (cdc.gov)
  • Public health officials can take steps to reduce the impact, one of which involves using the controversial pesticide DDT. (reason.org)
  • Recent reports and studies of a struggling California condor population indicate the persistence of DDT contamination, underscoring long-standing concerns that the chemical pesticide and its related byproduct chemicals continue to threaten animal life and affect human health. (wsws.org)
  • The more that is learned about the pesticide with the awesome name of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, the more dangerous it seems to be. (time.com)
  • Samples taken from the seafloor found that nearly 100 metric tons of the banned pesticide DDT had disappeared without having been cleaned up. (scpr.org)
  • The DDT had come from the Montrose Chemical Company dumping millions of pounds of the pesticide into the Palos Verdes Peninsula until the 1970s. (scpr.org)
  • A study done by the Public Health Institute in Berkeley, Calif., suggests that women who were exposed to higher levels of the pesticide DDT while they were in the womb were nearly 4 times more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer as adults than women who were exposed to lower levels before birth. (breastcancer.org)
  • Newswise - New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs. (newswise.com)
  • Historical trends in the lake sediments mirrored the known use of this pesticide in the province, with high levels of DDT in sediment layers from the 1960s and 70s. (newswise.com)
  • If there is a single pesticide almost everyone can name, it's DDT. (panna.org)
  • DDT was one of the first chemicals in widespread use as a pesticide. (panna.org)
  • But NYU chemists discovered that DDT exists in two forms, with one better at killing bugs, which could lead to using smaller pesticide amounts. (acsh.org)
  • The pesticide DDT (Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) was once a popular method of controlling vector-borne diseases, such as malaria, and other pests in Papua New Guinea, and was widely used across the health, agricultural, and industrial sectors. (thegef.org)
  • Women exposed to the pesticide DDT as children are five times as likely to develop breast cancer, according to a study published in Environmental Health Perspectives . (grist.org)
  • Even a pesticide industry representative at the symposium (from CropLife International) stressed the need for development of DDT alternatives for malaria control. (panna.org)
  • In some countries, such as South Africa, the pesticide DDT is an important chemical for control of malaria-carrying mosquitoes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane , commonly known as DDT , is a colorless, tasteless, and almost odorless crystalline chemical compound, an organochlorine , originally developed as an insecticide , and ultimately becoming infamous for its environmental impacts. (wikipedia.org)
  • DDT is similar in structure to the insecticide methoxychlor and the acaricide dicofol . (wikipedia.org)
  • DDT is an artificial insecticide prepared by the reaction ofchloral with chlorobenzene in the presence of sulfuric acid. (answers.com)
  • U.S. soldiers applying DDT-based insecticide during WWII. (treehugger.com)
  • Though the use has been cut dramatically since then, new research has found that DDT is still being emitted by the world's oceans, and that concentrations in the northern oceans may actually be increasing .Used as an agricultural insecticide and to control mosquitoes and other disease carrying insects, DDT was banned after research showed its powerful impact on marine life and birds. (treehugger.com)
  • DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloro-ethane) is an insecticide that was first used worldwide in 1946 to increase agricultural production and to reduce disease vectors (carriers). (encyclopedia.com)
  • After the war, DDT was used as an insecticide on many food crops in addition to eradicating disease carrying insects. (ehow.com)
  • Pennsalt produces DDT and its products in all standard forms and is now one of the country's largest producers of this amazing insecticide. (whale.to)
  • 1965). A related insecticide, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-di-( p -chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDD) was found in the liver of rats fed DDT (Klein et al. (inchem.org)
  • DDT, or dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, is an insecticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • We could end this suffering and death, if we use every available weapon-not just insecticide-treated bednets, but insecticides, too, especially DDT. (larouchepub.com)
  • Indoor DDT spraying, combined with insecticide-treated curtains had similar results elsewhere in the country. (larouchepub.com)
  • Despite this life-saving success, the World Bank and Roll Back Malaria have pressured Madagascar to progressively phase out DDT and replace it with an "environmentally friendly" insecticide, even though no chemical has yet been found that is nearly as effective as DDT. (larouchepub.com)
  • First synthesized by a graduate student in 1874, DDT went unnoticed until its potential application as an insecticide was discovered by chemist Paul H. Müller while working for the Swiss company Geigy during the late 1930s. (thenewatlantis.com)
  • spraying the insecticide DDT ââ? (reason.org)
  • Geigy quickly patented the formula (1940) as a general insecticide, and the manufacture of DDT began. (americanheritage.com)
  • Urgently needed was the kind of synthetic contact insecticide-easy and safe to handle, capable of being economically mass-produced-which DDT seemed to be. (americanheritage.com)
  • Forty-seven were found to convert 5% to 10% of the 14C-DDT to water-soluble products, 38 solubilized less than 5% of the insecticide, and 29 were apparently inactive by the test methods employed. (dtic.mil)
  • Scientists at Rutgers University found that having higher levels of the breakdown product of the insecticide DDT (DDE) in your blood seems to fuel the disease and make you more likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's. (prevention.com)
  • DDT was designed as an insecticide to kill insects," he explains. (prevention.com)
  • DDT - dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane - was developed as an insecticide in the 1940s, and was widely used during World War II to combat insect-borne diseases. (saferchemicals.org)
  • IMAGE: Five remote lakes in New Brunswick, Canada, still contain DDT in their sediments, decades after the insecticide was sprayed onto nearby trees. (sciencecodex.com)
  • By 1970, growing awareness of the harmful effects of DDT on wildlife led to curtailed use of the insecticide in the area. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Researchers from LSTM have found that a single genetic mutation causes resistance to DDT and pyrethroids (an insecticide class used in mosquito nets). (eurekalert.org)
  • DDT was created as an insecticide to prevent the spread of deadly diseases and to help farmers grow more food. (yahoo.com)
  • DDT is a chemical that helped stop malaria by killing the mosquitoes. (answers.com)
  • DDT was used in World War II to kill mosquitoes that carried malaria and lice that carried typhus. (answers.com)
  • As anyone can see, God designed mosquitoes to resist DDT in order to punish Africa for being an obvious counterexample to our righteous claims that AIDS is God's designed curse on homosexual immorality. (scienceblogs.com)
  • The signatories to the 'POPs Treaty' essentially agreed to ban all uses of DDT except as a last resort against disease-bearing mosquitoes. (worldwatch.org)
  • The men were selected from three communities where malaria is endemic and DDT is sprayed to control mosquitoes. (foxnews.com)
  • Vector mosquitoes that are not directly killed by DDT are repelled and obliged to feed and rest outdoors, which con- tributes to effective disease-transmission control. (who.int)
  • The U.S. Public Health Service distributed this folding informational comic to people whose homes had recently been sprayed with DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane), to explain the way that the chemical would kill malaria-carrying mosquitoes. (slate.com)
  • However, DDT continues to be a cheap and effective way to kill mosquitoes that transmit malaria, requiring lower concentrations than those for agricultural use. (encyclopedia.com)
  • DDT is still used in many parts of the world to eradicate malaria-carrying mosquitoes. (ehow.com)
  • In the United States, beginning in the1940s, large volumes of DDT were sprayed outdoors to kill mosquitoes and pests on crops. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The book also tackles the issue of resistance to the poison, saying DDT is a good repellent, not just killer, of mosquitoes. (reuters.com)
  • In 1958, The United States' National Malaria Eradication Program used an entirely new approach implementing DDT for spraying of mosquitoes. (whale.to)
  • DDT is widely banned because of concerns about its effects on human health and the environment but some countries still use it to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes. (scidev.net)
  • While DDT is currently banned in the United States, officials in Africa plan to expand its use to combat mosquitoes that spread malaria. (medindia.net)
  • Ninety percent of these women were born in Mexico, where DDT was widely used in agriculture during the 1970s, then used to control mosquitoes until 1995. (medindia.net)
  • Unfortunately, too many politicians, environmental activists, and bureaucrats promote programs that don't work and tell Africans they can't use DDT, which keeps deadly anopheles mosquitoes out of our homes for six months or more, with just one spraying on their inside walls. (larouchepub.com)
  • The only remaining legal use of DDT is to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes. (panna.org)
  • To simplify and give the impatient the punch line, success in eliminating the malaria organism required eliminating enough mosquitoes to prevent sufficient of the malaria organism before the mosquitoes developed resistance to DDT. (iwindsurf.com)
  • DDT was shown in some areas to irritate mosquitoes and reduce both the rate of house entering and successful blood feeding by those mosquitoes that did enter the house [9,10]. (iwindsurf.com)
  • At this point, of course, a heavyweight DDT offensive against malaria-carrying mosquitoes is unlikely to fly very far or very fast. (stanford.edu)
  • Charles Wondji said: 'We found a population of mosquitoes fully resistant to DDT (no mortality when they were treated with DDT) but also to pyrethroids. (eurekalert.org)
  • They took mosquitoes from Pahou in Benin, which were resistant to DDT and pyrethroids, and mosquitoes from a laboratory fully susceptible strain and did a genome wide comparison study. (eurekalert.org)
  • They designed a DNA-based diagnostic test for this type of resistance (metabolic resistance) and confirmed that this mutation was found in mosquitoes from other areas of the world with DDT resistance but was completely absent in regions without. (eurekalert.org)
  • They also introduced the gene into fruit flies ( Drosophila melanogaster ) and found they became resistant to DDT and pyrethroids compared to controls, confirming that just this single mutation is enough to make mosquitoes resistant to both DDT and permethrin. (eurekalert.org)
  • Solved: In Much Of Africa DDT Is Used To Combat Mosquitoes. (chegg.com)
  • home / study / science / biology / biology questions and answers / In Much Of Africa DDT Is Used To Combat Mosquitoes. (chegg.com)
  • Some mosquitoes have a mutant allele of an en. (chegg.com)
  • Toward the end of World War II, the U.S. military sprayed DDT in Europe, Africa and Asia to kill typhus-causing lice and malarial mosquitoes. (baltimoresun.com)
  • The inflammatory last sentence of the PDF is unreferenced and seems ignorant of DDT-resistant mosquitoes, or the current work on most cost effective malaria control. (johnquiggin.com)
  • As more sites are widely used to control insects on agricultural crops evaluated, the sites at which DDT, DDE, and DDD and insects that carry diseases like malaria and are found may increase. (cdc.gov)
  • In insects, DDT opens sodium ion channels in neurons, causing them to fire spontaneously, which leads to spasms and eventual death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insects with certain mutations in their sodium channel gene are resistant to DDT and similar insecticides. (wikipedia.org)
  • DDT spraying was also done to prevent polio by killing insects as they thought it was transmitted that way. (whale.to)
  • As well as being able to survive exposure to DDT, the resistant insects also produced three times as many eggs as non-resistant fruit flies. (scidev.net)
  • KEMRI's position reflects that of the World Health Organization, which champions the continued used of DDT to control insects that transmit parasites to people, under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. (scidev.net)
  • DDT, he said, was "dangerous for all animal life from insects to mammals. (counterpunch.org)
  • DDT killed more than insects. (counterpunch.org)
  • DDT also killed many insects it had not been designed to target, and also small animals, which ate DDT-poisoned fish and wildlife . (counterpunch.org)
  • The falcons] are not picking up the DDT directly, but get it by eating other birds which, in their southern migrations, ingest DDT-contaminated insects. (sciencenews.org)
  • Not until Müller took some of it home with him one day and tried it out on houseflies did anyone realize that DDT kills insects. (americanheritage.com)
  • Unfortunately, insects and humans share the target of DDT: the voltage-gated sodium channel. (prevention.com)
  • The researchers, led by Dr Charles Wondji, used a wide range of methods to narrow down how the resistance works, finding a single mutation in the GSTe2 gene, which makes insects break down DDT so it's no longer toxic. (eurekalert.org)
  • The only horrible death and destruction that DDT caused was to insects. (yahoo.com)
  • One of its side affects was to soften the eggshells of birds (most notably the Bald Eagle) who ingested DDT (through eating insects with DDT on them, or rodents who ate said insects). (yahoo.com)
  • DDT use peaked at the same time there was a dramatic reduction in the abundance of beetles insects especially susceptible to DDT in the diet of swifts, according to analysis of the pile of droppings. (bio-medicine.org)
  • DDT was eventually banned in the US in 1972, in part because of the influence of Carson's book. (scienceblogs.com)
  • This cycle of evaporation and After 1972, the use of DDT was no longer permitted deposition may be repeated many times. (cdc.gov)
  • DDT was banned from use in the United States in 1972, and remains banned barring public health emergency (e.g., outbreak of malaria) (73). (orst.edu)
  • DDT was banned for use in Sweden in 1970 and in the United States in 1972 (73). (orst.edu)
  • Carson's book spurred a decade of public anti-DDT activism that culminated in the Environmental Protection Agency's cancellation order for the chemical in 1972. (slate.com)
  • In 1972, DDT was banned. (ehow.com)
  • And as you know, in the United States DDT wasn't banned until 1972 and for that reason these archived blood samples were taken from women at a time when DDT was in very active use. (loe.org)
  • Although Carson never directly called for an outright ban on the use of DDT, its publication was a seminal event for the environmental movement and resulted in a large public outcry that eventually led, in 1972, to a ban on DDT's agricultural use in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was the human effects of DDT that convinced EPA to ban it in 1972. (counterpunch.org)
  • A súa publicación foi un evento case fundacional do movemento ambientalista e tivo como resultado un gran clamor de protesta público que finalmente levou, en 1972, á prohibición do DDT para o seu uso agrícola nos Estados Unidos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dear EarthTalk: I understand there is good news about the recovery of bird species like the Peregrine Falcon, Bald Eagle and others owed to the 1972 ban on DDT. (smdp.com)
  • In 1972 environmentalists‚Äô prayers were answered-and their hard work vindicated-with the federal government finally banning DDT. (smdp.com)
  • Without the 1972 ban on DDT and ensuing protections, the bald eagle, let alone dozens of other bird species, would likely be gone now in the continental U.S. And without the song of the birds, the spring would be a very silent time indeed. (smdp.com)
  • Two years after the American peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus anatum ) was declared endangered, the United States banned DDT in 1972. (sciencenews.org)
  • DDT was used widely throughout the United States to control insect pests in crops from 1939 until 1972, when the Environmental Protection Agency outlawed its use. (breastcancer.org)
  • The narrative in this meme ignores both the history of malaria control before the banning of DDT, malaria control efforts between 1972 and the Stockholm Convention, and more recent efforts at malaria control. (iwindsurf.com)
  • DDT has been banned in the U.S. since 1972, although other countries still use it. (prevention.com)
  • EPA banned nearly all domestic uses of DDT in 1972, after the publication of Silent Spring and broad public outcry about DDT's impacts on wildlife and people. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Did Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring approve the use of DDT and other insecticides? (answers.com)
  • There are currently 12 insecticides recommended for IRS, including DDT. (who.int)
  • Among the 12 insecticides currently recommended for this in- tervention, DDT is the one with the longest residual efficacy when sprayed on walls and ceilings (6-12 months depending on dosage and nature of sub- strate). (who.int)
  • The World Health Organization warned that a sudden worldwide ban on DDT could result in an epidemic of malaria in countries that cannot afford other effective insecticides. (encyclopedia.com)
  • We need mosquito nets but also insecticides like DDT," he said. (reuters.com)
  • Thankfully, President Bush, and the U.S. Congress and Agency for International Development have begun spending more money, and using DDT and other insecticides in Uganda, Tanzania, and Angola. (larouchepub.com)
  • Around the middle of the 20th century, forest stakeholders began using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane insecticides to combat pest outbreaks across North American forests. (upi.com)
  • Between 1950 and 1970 prior to legal restrictions, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) insecticides were widely applied to eastern North American forests to manage naturally occurring insect outbreaks, such as spruce budworm. (newswise.com)
  • Carson used DDT to tell the broader story of the disastrous consequences of the overuse of insecticides, and raised enough concern from her testimony before Congress to trigger the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (panna.org)
  • The book claimed that DDT and other pesticides had been shown to cause cancer and that their agricultural use was a threat to wildlife, particularly birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • No. It helped awaken the public to the use of it and helped show the effects of DDT and pesticides on the environment. (answers.com)
  • Carson was the author of the 1962 book Silent Spring , where she argued, among other things, that pervasive use of pesticides such as DDT was leading to long-term, harmful effects on the environment. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Mosquito populations rapidly develop resistance to DDT, creating enzymes to detoxify it, modifying their nervous systems to avoid its effects, and avoiding areas where DDT is sprayed - and recent research finds that that resistance continues to spread even after DDT spraying has stopped, lowering the effectiveness not only of DDT but also other pesticides (Current Biology, 8/9/05). (scienceblogs.com)
  • And that has led to an abundant use of synthetic pesticides, including one of the oldest and most dangerous: dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane, or DDT. (worldwatch.org)
  • DDT is no longer used or manufactured in most of the world, but because it does not break down readily, it is still one of the most commonly detected pesticides in the milk of nursing mothers. (worldwatch.org)
  • The study of 50 pregnant women found detectable levels of organochlorines in all of the women participating in the study-including DDT, PCBs and other pesticides that have been banned from use for more than 30 years. (medindia.net)
  • Organophosphates had previously supplanted DDT and the other organochlorine pesticides from whose effects many bird species are only now recovering. (counterpunch.org)
  • Levels of DDT in lake sediments were among the highest found in previously-sprayed areas of Canada and the U.S., suggesting very intensive past use of pesticides for spruce budworm control. (newswise.com)
  • Capitalizing on the iconic status of DDT, these groups are promoting widespread use of the chemical for malaria control as part of a broader effort to manufacture doubt about the dangers of pesticides, and to promote their anti-regulatory, free market agenda while attempting to undermine and roll back the environmental movement's legacy. (panna.org)
  • I request a reproduction of the book Before Silent Spring: Pesticides and Public Health in Pre-DDT America . (soilandhealth.org)
  • I declare that, after reasonable investigation, I am satisfied that a reproduction (not being a second-hand reproduction) of Before Silent Spring: Pesticides and Public Health in Pre-DDT America cannot be obtained within a reasonable time at an ordinary commercial price. (soilandhealth.org)
  • Speaking of pesticides, you probably had a healthy dose of one this morning and it's more toxic than DDT. (acsh.org)
  • Of 12 WHO-approved pesticides, "the best chemical we have is DDT. (baltimoresun.com)
  • To be published in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Andrology, the study compared levels of DDT and its metabolites in the blood of 311 South African men aged 18 to 40 with the quantity and quality of their semen. (foxnews.com)
  • We are concerned about the health of children and adults given the persistence of DDT and its active metabolites in the environment and in the body, and we are particularly concerned about the potential effects of continued DDT use on future generations. (scientificamerican.com)
  • DDT resistance is also conferred by up-regulation of genes expressing cytochrome P450 in some insect species, as greater quantities of some enzymes of this group accelerate the toxin's metabolism into inactive metabolites. (wikipedia.org)
  • This new work and some earlier studies comparing DDT with its metabolites, DDD and DDE, are summarized and discussed in the following monograph addendum. (inchem.org)
  • Daily oral administration of 150 mg/kg body-weight of technical DDT in the guinea-pig stimulated the formation of polar urinary cortisol metabolites. (inchem.org)
  • Exposure was directly estimated for a subgroup of 40 workers by measuring DDT metabolites in adipose tissue samples and indirectly estimated for 331 workers using a questionnaire to determine their occupational history. (ilo.org)
  • Evaluates the effects of DDT and its metabolites on the reproduction, growth, and survival of populations of organisms in the environment. (who.int)
  • Mucor alternans, a fungus exceptionally active in producing water-soluble metabolites from DDT, was used as a model for determining the identities of the water-soluble metabolites. (dtic.mil)
  • Exposure to DDT, DDE, and DDD occurs mostly from eating foods containing small amounts of these compounds, particularly meat, fish and poultry. (cdc.gov)
  • The results imply that non-occupational exposure to DDT is associated with impaired seminal parameters in men. (foxnews.com)
  • It is thought that inhalation exposure to DDT will not result in significant absorption through the lung alveoli (tiny gas-exchange sacs) but rather that it is probably trapped in mucous secretions and swallowed by exposed individuals following the tracheo-bronchial clearance of secretions by the cilia (73). (orst.edu)
  • Exposure to DDT at a young age may indicate a greater risk for developing breast cancer, according to new research by Dr. Barbara Cohn of the Public Health Institute in Berkeley, California. (loe.org)
  • Now, research suggests that women's age at first exposure to DDT may influence when in life the risk for breast malignancies is greatest. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • Towards the end of the GMEP, transmission was being maintained in many problem areas by physiologically susceptible vectors that avoided or minimized their exposure to DDT [6-8]. (iwindsurf.com)
  • Exposure to DDT is harmful to the nervous system. (saferchemicals.org)
  • These data demonstrate that perinatal exposure to DDT causes hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in adult offspring. (nih.gov)
  • And virtually every female in the U.S. who was a child between 1945 and 1965, when DDT was widely used, is in a high-risk category. (loe.org)
  • By then DDT was used widely in America. (counterpunch.org)
  • When the researchers examined the sediments for partially fossilized remains of Cladocera, they found that most lakes showed a shift from large-bodied to small-bodied zooplankton species, which are generally more tolerant to contaminants, beginning in the 1950s when DDT was widely applied in New Brunswick. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency lists DDT as a probable carcinogen, but previous research has been mixed about the link to breast cancer. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • EPA lists DDT as a probable human carcinogen. (saferchemicals.org)
  • They analyzed stored blood samples that had been collected from 1959 to 1967 during pregnancy at each trimester and in early postpartum to determine levels of DDT exposure. (auntminnie.com)
  • In the early 1960s, government regulators finally banned most uses of DDT-but only after millions of people had already developed diseases like cancer, infertility, liver and nervous system damage. (organicconsumers.org)
  • Analysis of the lake bed sediment cores revealed, as expected, elevated levels of DDT trapped in layers dated to the 1960s and 70s. (upi.com)
  • Nearly everyone alive has been exposed to this very persistent chemical, particularly women currently being diagnosed with breast cancer through early post-menopause who were alive in the 1950s and 1960s before DDT was banned in many countries," Cohn said by email. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • DDT is moderately to slightly toxic to studied mammalian species via the oral route. (orst.edu)
  • DDT is slightly to practically non-toxic to test animals via the dermal route, with reported dermal LD50s of 2,500-3,000 mg/kg in female rats (79, 73), 1000 in guinea pigs (73) and 300 in rabbits (73). (orst.edu)
  • This could, according to the team's computer models, persist to the point where DDT levels are toxic to marine life. (treehugger.com)
  • An epic Superfund battle later exposed the company's disposal of toxic waste through sewage pipes that poured into the ocean - but all the DDT that was barged out to sea drew comparatively little attention. (latimes.com)
  • But researchers also measured significant levels of DDT and its toxic byproducts in modern sediments. (upi.com)
  • Surprisingly, DDT and its toxic breakdown products are still very high in modern sediments-above levels where harmful biological effects tend to occur. (newswise.com)
  • It's another example of shifting the responsibility to research his claims, and I've never seen a reliable source that compare sucralose (a non-toxic sweetener) to DDT (a known carcinogen ). (scientificamerican.com)
  • DDT has been linked to cancer in humans and it is acutely toxic to fish and marine invertebrates. (thegef.org)
  • Seven months after the World Health Organization reversed its deadly 30-year ban on the use of DDT to fight malaria, the anti-DDT movement is up to its old tricks. (foxnews.com)
  • Use of DDT to fight malaria has been increasing since it was endorsed in 2006 by the World Health Organization and the President's Malaria Initiative, a U.S. aid program launched by former President Bush. (scientificamerican.com)
  • As for countries considering the use of DDT to fight malaria, Rogan said, "They have to entertain the idea that DDT is not an entirely innocuous compound. (medindia.net)
  • Though many other countries have banned it, DDT is still used to fight malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. (breastcancer.org)
  • It cataloged environmental impacts that coincided with widespread use of DDT in agriculture in the United States, and it questioned the logic of broadcasting potentially dangerous chemicals into the environment with little prior investigation of their environmental and health effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Next, despite the past widespread use of DDT, no prior studies credibly link DDT with semen/sperm problems. (foxnews.com)
  • The recent public concern for the hazards of DDT, especially in relation to the reports of Increased tumour incidence in experimental animals fed DDT and to the widespread occurrence of DDT in living organisms and generally throughout the environment, led to Its further consideration by this Joint Meeting. (inchem.org)
  • widespread use of DDT was successful in eliminating malaria in a number of countries. (iwindsurf.com)
  • One way would be to allow widespread use of DDT, which eradicated that same mosquito during the 20th century. (acsh.org)
  • DDD also enters the environment as a breakdown product of DDT. (cdc.gov)
  • Also in animals, short-term oral exposure to small amounts of DDT or its breakdown products may also have harmful effects on reproduction. (cdc.gov)
  • DDE and DDD may also enter the air when they are breakdown products of DDT. (cdc.gov)
  • The researchers examined blood levels of DDT and one of the breakdown products -- known as DDE -- in 360 pregnant women from California's Central Valley who are participating in a long-term UC Berkeley project called the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS). (medindia.net)
  • DDE and DDD are breakdown products of DDT. (cdc.gov)
  • Biologists have discovered that because of the low-water solubility and high fat solubility, high concentrations of DDT and DDE, a potent byproduct of the metabolic breakdown of DDT, are found in the blubber of the sea lions. (wsws.org)
  • DDT is highly resistant to metabolic breakdown. (wsws.org)
  • USDA found DDT breakdown products in 60% of heavy cream samples, 42% of kale greens, 28% of carrots and lower percentages of many other foods. (panna.org)
  • DDT breakdown products were found in the blood of 99% of the people tested by CDC . (panna.org)
  • Joshua Kurek and colleagues wondered if elevated DDT use in the 1950s and 60s could have affected zooplankton populations in lakes, and whether these changes, and DDT and its breakdown products, persist today. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The team analyzed the concentrations of DDT and its breakdown products in thin sections of the sediments, finding that peak DDT levels generally occurred during the 1970s and 80s. (sciencecodex.com)
  • What chemicals are in DDT? (answers.com)
  • DDE (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene) and DDD (dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane) are chemicals similar to DDT that contaminate commercial DDT preparations. (cdc.gov)
  • DDT is also one of the 'dirty dozen' chemicals included in the 2001 Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. (worldwatch.org)
  • DDT is one of 12 chemicals identified as a persistent organic pollutant that the Convention restricts. (who.int)
  • An estimated 1.5 million metric tons of DDT were used between the 1940s and the 1970s, when strict restrictions were placed on the chemicals worldwide. (treehugger.com)
  • The Excellent Powder" claims new evidence shows DDT is harmless because it is similar to organic chemicals found in nature that animal life can deal with. (reuters.com)
  • The deathly legacy of DDT and DDT-like chemicals has been a long one. (counterpunch.org)
  • suggests that DDT affects breast cancer as an endocrine disruptor, that the period of time between first exposure and cancer risk seems to be around 40 years -- and that other endocrine-disrupting chemicals could potentially simulate this kind of risk pattern," said lead author Barbara Cohn, PhD. (auntminnie.com)
  • These chemicals included hexachlorobenzene, DDT, and several PCB congeners. (medindia.net)
  • Although often applied to forests by airplane, chemicals like DDT are highly persistent and can eventually wash into lakes from their surrounding landscape. (newswise.com)
  • PCBs and DDT are chemicals that were banned more than 30 years ago, but our air, water, land, and bodies are so contaminated that decades of cleanup efforts have yet to eliminate their threats to our health. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Unless you live near an industrial or agricultural site contaminated with PCBs or DDT, your greatest source of exposure to these chemicals is likely to be food. (saferchemicals.org)
  • But if you're scared of chemicals, you might actually prefer DDT to DEET. (acsh.org)
  • The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) determined that DDT may reasonable be anticipated to be a human carcinogen. (cdc.gov)
  • The Environmental Protection Agency banned DDT in 1971 as a potential human carcinogen. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Dr. Don Roberts, Professor Emeritus of Tropical Public Health at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in Bethesda, MD, shows that no expert review of DDT concludes that it is a human carcinogen. (acsh.org)
  • The main reason for declining use of DDT as an antimalarial has been the development of resistance. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Carson and others, have helped to slow the development of resistance, and therefore increased the effectiveness of DDT in antimalarial use ( links on this here ). (scienceblogs.com)
  • Many insect pests may have developed resistance to DDT (79). (orst.edu)
  • We found that DDT resistance in fruit flies not only carries no cost, but also confers an advantage when inherited through the female," says lead researcher Richard ffrench-Constant, of the University of Bath, United Kingdom. (scidev.net)
  • X-ray crystallography of the protein coded by the gene illustrated exactly how the mutation conferred resistance, by opening up the 'active site' where DDT molecules bind to the protein, so more can be broken down. (eurekalert.org)
  • The failure of DDT to eradicate malaria was due to resistance, promoted by overuse in agriculture and elsewhere, exactly as Carson warned. (johnquiggin.com)
  • By October 1945, DDT was available for public sale in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • CURWOOD: So DDT gets introduced for broad use in 1945, and looking at your study you estimate that the peak dietary exposure was in 1965. (loe.org)
  • BIOLOGICAL DATA AND TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION Biochemical aspects DDT is only slightly absorbed through the skin, but the degree of absorption depends on the vehicle used (Cameron & Burgess, 1945). (inchem.org)
  • 1944 Rabbit Oral 250-500* Cameron & Burgess, 1945 Bishopp, 1946 Dog Intravenous Approximately Philips & Gilman, 1946 50 Cat Oral 400-600* Philips & Gilman, 1946 Monkey Oral >200 Bishopp, 1946 Horse Oral >300 Bishopp, 1946 Chicken Oral >1 300 Bishopp, 1946 * The LD 50 dose of DDT varies within wide limits, depending on sex and the type of vehicle used. (inchem.org)
  • When the US War Production Board announced that small quantities of DDT would be made available for civilian use in August 1945, everyone from homemakers to farmers to government officials jostled for a piece of DDT's diabolical magic. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • High levels of DDT can affect the nervous system causing excitability, tremors and seizures. (cdc.gov)
  • Conducted in Limpopo, South Africa by de Jager and his colleagues, the study found men in the sprayed homes had extremely high levels of DDT in their blood and that their semen volume and sperm counts were low. (scientificamerican.com)
  • High levels of DDT were observed in adipose tissue, highlighting the need for exposure prevention programs. (ilo.org)
  • Women exposed to DDT between the ages of 3 and 13 years had an increased risk for breast cancer before age 50 and also for later breast cancer at ages 50 to 54. (auntminnie.com)
  • Women exposed to DDT before age 14, particularly in infancy and early childhood, were most likely to develop breast cancer, before age 50 and before they went through menopause, researchers report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • However, women exposed to DDT after infancy had a greater risk of developing cancer later, at ages 50 to 54. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • In the current study, women exposed to DDT before age 3 had an elevated risk of premenopausal breast cancer. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • Women exposed to DDT from ages 3 to 13, meanwhile, had an elevated risk of breast cancer both before and after menopause, although the risk was stronger for diagnoses before age 50. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • And women exposed to DDT after age 13, and after puberty, had an elevated risk of breast cancer after age 50, but not earlier. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • Pregnant women exposed to DDT are more likely to have premature or small-for-gestational-age babies. (saferchemicals.org)
  • 2019. Toxicological profile for DDT, DDE, DDD (Draft for Public Comment). (cdc.gov)
  • This Public Health Statement is the summary exposed to a substance only when you come in chapter from the Toxicological Profile for DDT, contact with it. (cdc.gov)
  • In recent years numerous studies on DDT have shown its environmental persistence and its ability to bioaccumulate, especially in higher animals. (answers.com)
  • Although the global use of the endocrine-disrupting chemical DDT has decreased, its persistence in the environment has resulted in continued human exposure. (nih.gov)
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined that DDT may possibly cause cancer in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • At a high enough dosage, DDT can have as detrimental an effect on vertebrates, including humans. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Based on recent studies, we conclude that humans are exposed to DDT and DDE, that indoor residual spraying can result in substantial exposure and that DDT may pose a risk for human populations,' the scientists wrote in their consensus statement, published online today in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives . (scientificamerican.com)
  • Dichloro-diphenyl-trichloromethylmethane (DDT) has been blamed for birth defects in humans and threatening endangered birds such as the bald eagle by thinning their egg shells. (reuters.com)
  • Greenpeace scientist David Santillo told Reuters greens approved use of DDT where there was no alternative, but evidence of it accumulating in birds and polar bears was clear, and evidence of harm to humans worrying enough to urge caution. (reuters.com)
  • Dr. Walter Rogan, senior investigator in the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences' epidemiology branch said that while DDT appears hazardous to some animals, DDT's health effects on humans are still being studied. (medindia.net)
  • Because of baseless Western fears that DDT is more dangerous to humans than malaria, which causes 2 to 3 million deaths every year. (reason.org)
  • DDT being declared a carcinogenic risk to humans was a scientific anomaly, drawn entirely from high-dose animal studies. (acsh.org)
  • Prenatal DDT exposure is associated with elevated blood pressure in humans. (nih.gov)
  • It is also possible that the correlation between DDT use and the decline of fish and bird populations was caused by the simultaneous use of other pollutants such as PCBs. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Longnecker MP, Rogan WJ, Lucier G (1997) The human health effects of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and PCBS (polychlorinated biphenyls) and an overview of organochlorines in public health. (springer.com)
  • We are still exposed to PCBs and DDT through our food. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Animal and fatty foods contain the highest levels of DDT and PCBs because they are stored in fat and increase in concentration as they move up the food chain. (saferchemicals.org)
  • PCBs and DDT build up in sediment in rivers, lakes, and coastal areas, then accumulate in fish. (saferchemicals.org)
  • The histories of DDT and PCBs are both success stories and cautionary tales. (saferchemicals.org)
  • The most important actions you can take to reduce the PCBs and DDT in your diet are to cut back on animal fats and watch the type of fish you eat. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Check with state advisories before eating sport-caught fish or shellfish, which are often high in PCBs and DDT. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Technical-grade DDT is a mixture harm you and because these sites may be sources of of three forms, p,p'-DDT (85%), o,p'-DDT (15%), exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Technical grade DDT is actually a mixture of three isomers of DDT, principally the p,p'-DDT isomer (ca. 85%), with the o,p'-DDT and o,o'-DDT isomers typically present in much lesser amounts (73). (orst.edu)
  • DDT was first synthesized in 1874 by the Austrian chemist Othmar Zeidler. (wikipedia.org)
  • O DDT sintetizouse por primeira vez en 1874, e as súas propiedades insecticidas foron descubertas polo químico suízo Paul Hermann Müller en 1939. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is an organo-chlorine that was synthesized in 1874, but its insecticidal properties were discovered in 1939. (ipen.org)
  • The Convention has given an exemption for the production and public health use of DDT for indoor application to vector-borne diseases, mainly because of the absence of equally effective and efficient alternatives. (who.int)
  • WHO actively sup- ports the promotion of chemical safety1 and, together with the United Na- tions Environment Programme, shares a common commitment to the global goal of reducing and eventually eliminating the use of DDT while minimizing the burden of vector-borne diseases. (who.int)
  • India is one such country, and it reports that it is using DDT for prevention of vector borne diseases such as malaria, dengue and Kala-azar due to lack of suitable alternatives. (ipen.org)
  • Haflong, February 5: A two-day training-cum-demonstration of indoor residual spray of DDT organized by Joint Director, Health Services, Dima Hasao, Haflong among the staff of vector-borne diseases department from different health centres of Dima Hasao at the Cultural Institute Hall, Haflong concluded on Thursday. (sentinelassam.com)
  • However, the use of DDT to control vector-borne diseases continues in developing countries. (nih.gov)
  • The production and use of DDT are strictly restricted by an international agreement known as the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollut- ants ( 2 ). (who.int)
  • Banned for agricultural uses worldwide by the 2001 Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants , the use of DDT is still permitted in small quantities in countries that need it, with support mobilized for the transition to safer and more effective alternatives. (panna.org)
  • The treatment of DDT under the Stockholm Convention is strongly supported by PAN and our international partners. (panna.org)
  • A dangerous persistent organic pollutant targeted for elimination under the Stockholm Convention , DDT was banned in many countries where it was still in use in 1983. (thegef.org)
  • DDT is currently listed in Annex B of the Stockholm Convention, with its production and/or use restricted for disease vector control purposes in accordance with related World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations and guidelines. (ipen.org)
  • This convention, among other things, recognises "urgent and immediate need of many of the malaria-endemic countries to maintain their reliance on the use of DDT for indoor residual spraying to control insect vectors, particularly malaria vectors, until viable, effective and affordable alternatives are found. (scidev.net)
  • Another study found that indoor spraying with DDT slashed malaria rates by nearly 75% in just a few years in Madagascar's highlands. (larouchepub.com)
  • Indoor spraying with DDT is one of a number of tools being used to control malaria around the world. (panna.org)
  • Affected birds begin laying eggs with thin eggshells, and the offspring of these birds with high concentrations of DDT are unable to develop properly. (answers.com)
  • Like other fat-soluble compounds, DDT is transferred up the food chain more efficiently than are water-soluble compounds, thereby achieving higher concentrations among carnivores. (encyclopedia.com)
  • One sediment sample showed DDT concentrations 40 times greater than the highest contamination recorded at the Superfund site - a federally designated area of hazardous waste that officials had contained to shallower waters near Palos Verdes. (latimes.com)
  • Initially DDT was spectacularly successful particularly in the control of malaria, as well as against agricultural pests. (answers.com)
  • Eating contaminated imported foods from countries that still allow the use of DDT to control pests. (cdc.gov)
  • The notion that DDT could be used to exterminate entire species of living things firrst arose in the mostly malaria-free United States, where fed-up farmers and gardeners continued to battle insect pests. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • Microbial Degradation of DDT. (dtic.mil)
  • For early postmenopausal breast cancer, p, p'-DDT was associated with risk for all women (ORDDT 50-54 = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.48 to 2.67). (nih.gov)
  • Unfortunately, however, DDT is still a routine option in 19 countries, most of them in Africa. (worldwatch.org)
  • A panel of scientists recommended today that the spraying of DDT in malaria-plagued Africa and Asia should be greatly reduced because people are exposed in their homes to high levels that may cause serious health effects. (scientificamerican.com)
  • We cannot allow people to die from malaria, but we also cannot continue using DDT if we know about the health risks,' said Tiaan de Jager, a member of the panel who is a professor at the School of Health Systems & Public Health at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In 2007, at least 3,950 tons of DDT were sprayed for mosquito control in Africa and Asia, according to a report by the United Nations Environment Programme. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Many health studies have been conducted in the United States, but on people who carry small traces of DDT in their bodies, not the high levels found in people in Africa. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In a book launched on Wednesday, Donald Roberts, professor of tropical medicine at the U.S. military's Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences, and Richard Tren, head of lobby group Africa Fighting Malaria, argue that DDT is the only effective weapon against the deadly mosquito-borne parasite. (reuters.com)
  • Roberts and Tren's book examines a 2009 study linking DDT in South Africa to birth defects and argues the data doesn't support it. (reuters.com)
  • The findings come at a time when many countries, especially those in sub-Saharan Africa, are considering re-introducing DDT to combat malaria. (scidev.net)
  • Attacks on Carson from groups like The Competitive Enterprise Institute and Africa Fighting Malaria portray DDT as the simple solution to malaria, and blame Carson for "millions of deaths in Africa. (panna.org)
  • Unfortunately, vocal groups such as Africa Fighting Malaria continue to promote a simplistic "DDT or nothing" debate , ignoring on-the-ground evidence from around the world that more effective approaches are saving lives without putting communities in harm's way from exposure to the long-lasting chemical. (panna.org)
  • PAN works with international allies, governments and on-the-ground groups in Africa to mobilize resources and political will to combat malaria, and remains active in international legal processes to support the global phase out of DDT and promote the safest and most effective malaria control solutions. (panna.org)
  • There is a right wing meme about DDT that has been posted here by mrgybe and repeated by Bard, that runs along the lines that the banning of DDT was done for political reasons, without scientific backing or integrity, and led to the death of millions in Africa. (iwindsurf.com)
  • In 1955, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the Global Malaria Eradication Programme (GMEP) based primarily on DDT-IRS supplemented with mass drug administration in malaria-endemic countries outside of sub-Saharan Africa [5]. (iwindsurf.com)
  • Richard Tren, who spoke at the meeting for Africa Fighting Malaria (AFM), is an economist by training whose public career has included manufacturing doubt about climate change as well as spreading misinformation about the effectiveness of DDT in controlling malaria. (panna.org)
  • In this study, the primary goal is to examine the relationship between DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) levels and the odds of loss of clinically-recognized pregnancies amongst women in Limpopo, South Africa. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Commercial DDT is a mixture of several closely-related compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental oestrogenic compounds, such as the organochlorines DDT (dicophane (2,2-bis ( p -chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane)), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dioxins, have been linked to altered sexual development in various species, to a decrease in semen quality, and to an increased risk of breast cancer in women. (bmj.com)
  • Anacystis nidulans, a freshwater blue-green alga, has been found to lerate sodium chloride (1 percent by weight) and DDT [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis chlorophenyl) ethane] (800 parts per billion) separately, but growth was inhibited in the presence of both compounds. (sciencemag.org)
  • We don't know exactly how DDT can cause breast cancer, but we do know that it is an endocrine disruptor," said Julia Brody of the Silent Spring Institute in Newton, Massachusetts, who wasn't involved in the study. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • DDT appears to be an endocrine disruptor with responsive breast targets from in utero to menopause. (nih.gov)
  • DDT is an endocrine disruptor, which means it acts like a hormone or affects how other hormones act in the body. (breastcancer.org)
  • p, p'-DDT was associated with breast cancer through age 54 years. (nih.gov)
  • To wit, the Peregrine Fund was founded in 1970 by a leading Cornell ornithologist to help nurse peregrine falcon populations hit hard by DDT back to their once abundant numbers. (smdp.com)
  • Scientists also measured a correlation between greater DDT levels and smaller water flea populations. (upi.com)
  • There was also evidence linking DDT with severe declines in bald eagle populations due to thinning eggshells. (panna.org)
  • Those mosquito populations that responded by changing their behaviour to avoid DDT by feeding outdoors and not resting indoors had a selective advantage. (iwindsurf.com)
  • Analysis of 50 years' bird droppings inside a large decommissioned chimney on Queen's campus, provided evidence that DDT and bird diet may have played a role, in a long-term decline for populations of insect-eating birds in North America. (bio-medicine.org)
  • [6] Opposition to DDT was focused by the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson 's book Silent Spring . (wikipedia.org)
  • Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring, was released in 1962 and documented the adverse effects of DDT on the environment. (encyclopedia.com)
  • En 1962, Rachel Carson publicou o libro Silent Spring ( Primavera silenciosa ), que tivo grande repercusión. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rachel Carson highlighted the dangers of DDT in her groundbreaking 1962 book Silent Spring . (panna.org)
  • After the publication of Rachel Carson's explosive book Silent Spring in 1962 launched the environmentalist movement, DDT - a demonstrably, even uniquely, effective anti-mosquito agent - was banned in the 1970s, The ban may well have brought the bald eagle back from the brink of extinction. (stanford.edu)
  • To this day, runoff from agricultural lands transports DDT-containing sediment to rivers and streams, where it is taken up by fish. (saferchemicals.org)
  • Should DDT Be Used to Combat Malaria? (scientificamerican.com)
  • DDT was first used during World War II to combat malaria and typhus among civilians and troops. (ipen.org)
  • Antimalarial uses have received specific exemptions from proposals to phase out DDT, until alternatives are developed. (scienceblogs.com)
  • It is expected that there will be a continued role for DDT in malaria control until equally cost-effective alternatives are developed. (who.int)
  • A premature shift to less effective or more costly alternatives to DDT, without a strengthening of the capacity (human, technical, financial) of Member States will not only be unsustainable, but will also have a negative impact on the disease burden in endemic countries. (who.int)
  • Until safe, affordable alternatives are developed, DDT will continue to be used in many countries where malaria is endemic, and its residues will be found in soils and human breast milk around the world. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The 15 environmental health experts, who reviewed almost 500 health studies, concluded that DDT 'should be used with caution, only when needed, and when no other effective, safe and affordable alternatives are locally available. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Safer alternatives should be tested first and if successful, DDT should be phased out without putting people at risk. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Organic Bytes #537: Monsanto, Glyphosate and DDT: Déjà vu all over again? (organicconsumers.org)
  • Glyphosate is actually, in many ways, similar to DDT, which is known to cause reproductive problems, among other things. (care2.com)
  • Interestingly enough, when asked which toxin he would prefer to use if he had to make a choice between two evils, Dr. Huber says he'd take DDT over glyphosate any day. (care2.com)
  • The researchers conducted a so-called "regression analysis" to evaluate the nature of any statistical relationships between blood levels of DDT and various characteristics of the men's semen/sperm. (foxnews.com)
  • In the context of these analyses, a non-zero beta (either positive or negative) means that a statistical relationship between DDT levels and sperm characteristics was observed, while a beta of zero means no relationship was observed. (foxnews.com)
  • For semen volume and blood DDT, the researchers reported a beta of -0.0005, meaning that they measured a very slight decline in semen volume with increasing blood DDT levels. (foxnews.com)
  • While the beta for the DDT metabolite known as DDE was a statistically insignificant -0.0003, the beta for DDT was 0.0022 - meaning that sperm counts slightly increased with greater levels of blood DDT. (foxnews.com)
  • One-time administration of DDT to rats at doses of 50 mg/kg led to decreased thyroid function and a single dose of 150 mg/kg led to increased blood levels of liver-produced enzymes and changes in the cellular chemistry in the central nervous system of monkeys (73). (orst.edu)
  • However, subsequent studies found no correlation between DDT levels and eggshell thickness either in nature or in controlled experiments. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Furthermore, dietary levels of 5-200 ppm of DDT decreased the liver glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rats (Tinsley, 1965). (inchem.org)
  • The researchers followed 15,528 women who participated in the Public Health Institute's Child Health and Development Studies for nearly six decades, tracking age at first DDT exposure, DDT levels during pregnancy, and age when breast cancer was diagnosed. (auntminnie.com)
  • For each tenfold increase in DDT levels measured in the mother, the researchers found a corresponding two- to three-point decrease in the child's mental development scores at 12 and 24 months. (medindia.net)
  • In physical skills exams, there were two-point decreases in children's scores at 6 months and 12 months for each tenfold increase in DDT levels in the mothers. (medindia.net)
  • 1963). Mouse A total of 683 mice of the BALB/c strain spread over five generations, were fed dietary levels of 2.8 - 3.00 ppm of DDT (0.4 -0.7 mg/kg body-weight/day) for six months. (inchem.org)
  • EVALUATION FOR ACCEPTABLE DAILY INTAKE Biochemical aspects Induction of hepatic microsomal enzyme activity was found to occur in a dose-related manner at dietary levels of 1-50 ppm of DDT, but no induction was found at 0.2 ppm. (inchem.org)
  • Studies on rats receiving 0, 1, 5, 10 and 50 ppm of DDT in their diet for 4, 8 and 12 weeks, as well as 12 weeks followed by 4 weeks withdrawal, showed storage in the body fat at all levels with the possible exception of those receiving 1 ppm. (inchem.org)
  • The study followed 15,528 women over nearly six decades, tracking age at first DDT exposure, DDT levels during pregnancy and age when any breast cancers were diagnosed. (channelnewsasia.com)
  • To determine the level of DDT the daughters were exposed to in the womb, the researchers analyzed stored blood samples from the CHDS to measure DDT levels in the mothers' blood during pregnancy or immediately after giving birth. (breastcancer.org)
  • The researchers measured DDT levels in the mothers of 118 daughters who were diagnosed with breast cancer. (breastcancer.org)
  • They also measured DDT levels in the mothers of 354 daughters who were not diagnosed with breast cancer so they could compare the levels. (breastcancer.org)
  • The researchers found that higher levels of DDT in the mother's blood were linked to a breast cancer risk nearly 4 times higher than average in the daughter. (breastcancer.org)
  • Mexican Americans have much higher levels, which could be because Mexico permitted the use of DDT until the 1990s, Dr. Richardson says. (prevention.com)
  • DDT has been associated with miscarriage and fetal loss in areas with high levels of exposure, but more research is needed to determine what levels of exposure are associated with loss of pregnancies. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To examine the relationship between pre-pregnancy levels of DDT in the blood and the loss of clinically recognized pregnancies. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • An initial two-year pilot of 850 non-pregnant women was proposed to evaluate field procedures, recruitment strategies and the reproducibility of DDT levels. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • DDT may adversely affect whole ecosystems. (encyclopedia.com)
  • DDT has been accused of contributing to the virtual disappearance of the peregrine-falcon on the East Coast of the U.S., of causing cancer in mice, and of upsetting whole ecosystems. (time.com)
  • Zombies are hard to kill, but one I thought had been permanently dealt with - the myth that Rachel Carson brought about a worldwide ban on DDT, leading to millions of deaths from malaria[1]. (johnquiggin.com)
  • In an effort to combat spruce budworm outbreaks, DDT was sprayed liberally across conifer forests throughout North American during the 1950s, 60s and early 70s. (upi.com)
  • ABIDJAN (Reuters) - Six years after the insect killer DDT was globally outlawed on grounds of environmental damage, two researchers say there are new reasons for doubting the chemical is harmful and are urging its use against malaria. (reuters.com)
  • DDT was used in the second half of World War II to limit the spread of the insect-born diseases malaria and typhus among civilians and troops. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today, everyone can enjoy added comfort, health and safety through the insect killing power of Pennalt DDT products. (whale.to)
  • In Kenya, two leading research institutions - the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) and the International Center for Insect Physiology and Ecology (ICIPE) - disagree over whether DDT should be re-introduced. (scidev.net)
  • He concluded that the popular insect poison DDT was the agent of their disease. (counterpunch.org)
  • EDF enlisted the help of dozens of scientific experts-ornithologists, ecologists, toxicologists, carcinogenesis experts, and insect control specialists-to testify at multi-month hearings to prove its point in regard to the dangers of DDT. (smdp.com)
  • DDT was dubbed the "atomic bomb" of the insect world. (baltimoresun.com)
  • However, DDT was banned in the United States in 1973 because of its lethal effect on birds. (answers.com)
  • As a result, DDT from fishes end up highly concentrated in the birds that eat fishes contaminated with DDT. (answers.com)
  • DDT, and especially DDE, build up in plants and in fatty tissues of fish, birds, and other animals. (cdc.gov)
  • DDT doomed birds by making it impossible to give birth to live chicks. (counterpunch.org)
  • DDT was particularly deleterious to predatory birds, bringing peregrine falcons, osprey, brown pelicans, and bald eagles to the brink of extinction. (counterpunch.org)
  • Carson reported that birds ingesting DDT tended to lay thin-shelled eggs which would in turn break prematurely in the nest, resulting in marked population declines. (smdp.com)
  • Burnett knew that this could be caused by DDT, which by inhibiting the delivery of calcium makes eggshells so thin that the parent birds accidentally crush the egg while caring for it. (wsws.org)
  • No one concerned about the environmental damage of DDT set out to kill African children," reporter Tina Rosenberg generously allowed. (scienceblogs.com)
  • DDT, DDE, and DDD have been found in at least 441 of the 1,613 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (cdc.gov)
  • This study represents the vanguard of the coming backlash against the WHO's lifting of the DDT ban by anti-DDT environmental activists who are advocating an international treaty that would essentially ban DDT once and for all. (foxnews.com)
  • Unless otherwise specified, the toxicological, environmental effects and environmental fate and chemistry data presented here refer to the technical product DDT. (orst.edu)
  • DDT is now used in countries where many of the people are malnourished, extremely poor and possibly suffering from immune-compromising diseases such as AIDS, which may increase their susceptibility to chemical exposures,' said panel member Jonathan Chevrier, a University of California at Berkeley post-doctoral researcher in epidemiology and in environmental health sciences. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Environmental group Greenpeace defended the United Nations' aim of eventually eliminating DDT use worldwide and said evidence that it harms wildlife and human health was sound, even if not conclusive. (reuters.com)
  • decades of environmental activism (against) DDT," the book concludes. (reuters.com)
  • DDT still has limited use in disease vector control because of its effectiveness in killing mosquitos and thus reducing malarial infections, but that use is controversial due to environmental and health concerns. (wikipedia.org)
  • ICIPE argues that the health and environmental risks of reintroducing DDT are considerable and that the East African region as a whole would suffer if the ban were lifted. (scidev.net)
  • But DDT - the all-but-indestructible compound dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, which first stunned and jolted the public into environmental action - persists as an unsolved and largely forgotten problem. (latimes.com)
  • I can only conclude that, in their minds, environmental considerations and international criticism about DDT take precedence over African lives. (larouchepub.com)
  • Like many environmental toxins, DDT passes freely through the placenta during pregnancy, where it gains direct access to the developing fetus. (mercola.com)
  • Indeed, one of the world‚Äôs leading environmental non-profits, the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), initially formed in 1967 in reaction to the DDT problem. (smdp.com)
  • The tsunami disaster certainly warrants emergency use of DDT - as some environmental activists admit. (reason.org)
  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) remedial project manager for Palos Verdes, the company discharged untreated DDT waste directly into the Los Angeles County Sanitation District's sewer system in the 1950s and 60s. (wsws.org)
  • However, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have shown that DDT lingers in sediments from New Brunswick lakes, where it could alter zooplankton communities. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Millions of lives were saved during the war because … of the effectiveness of DDT. (answers.com)
  • It's so ubiquitous that some scientists refer to it as the new DDT . (organicconsumers.org)
  • The scientists reported that DDT may have a variety of human health effects, including reduced fertility, genital birth defects, breast cancer, diabetes and damage to developing brains. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Some scientists fear that DDT, washed into oceans, may kill off the plankton that supplies 70% of the earth's oxygen. (time.com)
  • Scientists invented ddt and caused horrible death and destruction so why should I trust them now? (yahoo.com)
  • But, this was something that was discovered (by SCIENTISTS, btw) decades after DDT was introduced, and there is no way the people who invented DDT could know about that. (yahoo.com)
  • At the Geneva symposium scientists who have been attacked by AFM for their work documenting the human health harms of DDT took the opportunity to tell Tren he should leave discussions of DDT health impacts and its use in malaria control to scientists, doctors and public health experts. (panna.org)
  • Despite bans, DDT is still in use in some places today. (treehugger.com)
  • There had not been any known source of DDT contamination at Big Sur, but Burnett looked to the breeding grounds of California sea lions, on the coast of Palos Verdes. (wsws.org)
  • Half a century ago Montrose Chemical Corporation in Palos Verdes was the world's largest producer of DDT, which had been first used to control the spread of malaria and typhus during WWII. (wsws.org)
  • What should California do about DDT from Palos Verdes shelf? (scpr.org)
  • I am familiar with DDT, and the fact that it's a very difficult compound to degrade. (care2.com)
  • The post-World War II development of a potent new compound called dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane -- or simply DDT -- changed all that. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • From 1950 to 1980, DDT was extensively used in agriculture - more than 40,000 tonnes each year worldwide - and it has been estimated that a total of 1.8 million tonnes have been produced globally since the 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) was used extensively to control malaria, typhus, body lice, and bubonic plague worldwide, until countries began restricting its use in the 1970s. (nih.gov)
  • DDT, despite mounting scientific evidence against its use, stayed on the market for decades. (organicconsumers.org)
  • The reason is their chemical properties: DDT belongs to the organochlorines, a huge group of chlorine-based poisons that last for decades in nature while accumulating in the fat of the animal ingesting them. (counterpunch.org)
  • Although DDT has been banned in the US for decades, it still persists in the environment, including in the food chain. (mercola.com)
  • today, thanks to the DDT ban and other conservation efforts, some 10,000 pairs of bald eagles inhabit the Lower 48-that‚Äôs a 20-fold population increase in just four decades! (smdp.com)
  • No effects were seen in people who took small daily doses of DDT by capsule for 18 months. (cdc.gov)
  • The physical effects of DDT on the brains of infants whose mothers are exposed to it are not entirely understood nor is it known if the developmental effects in infants will be permanent. (medindia.net)
  • The use of indirect measures of DDT exposure in epidemiologic studies of health effects is discussed. (ilo.org)
  • The same type of effects would be expected by breathing DDT particles in the air or by contact of the skin with high amounts of DDT. (cdc.gov)
  • Effects of the endocrine-disrupting chemical DDT on self-renewal and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. (nih.gov)
  • Accumulating evidence suggests that DDT exposure has long-term adverse effects on development, yet the impact on growth and differentiation of adult stem cells remains unclear. (nih.gov)
  • The coadministration of ICI 182,780 blocked the effects of DDT. (nih.gov)
  • The excellent DDT powder which had been fully experimented with and found to yield astonishing results will henceforth be used on a great scale by the British forces in Burma and by the American and Australian forces in the Pacific and India in all theatres. (thenewatlantis.com)
  • It wouldn't dissolve in water, which meant that DDT powder, even if sprinkled on human skin or inhaled, had no discernible effect on people. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • I would see people coming here to get DDT to put on their vegetable gardens, or kids playing with the powder, not only around the containers but also inside of them. (thegef.org)
  • Not ones to bow to or even admit global scientific consensus, Tren, Roger Bate and other DDT promoters recently self-published The Excellent Powder: DDT's Political and Scientific history - a remarkable title given the authors' lack of relevant scientific expertise. (panna.org)
  • The lead researcher told Mercury that there is sufficient evidence to be concerned about the health impacts of DDT and to consider moving toward safer alternative methods for malaria control. (foxnews.com)