Loading...
  • interferons
  • Cytokines may include chemokines , interferons , interleukins , lymphokines , and tumour necrosis factors but generally not hormones or growth factors (despite some overlap in the terminology ). (wikipedia.org)
  • ligand
  • The ligand of OX40, called OX40 ligand (OX40L, TNFSF4, gp34), which is expressed by antigen presenting cells, binds to OX40 on T cells, preventing them from dying and subsequently increasing cytokine production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) is a small cytokine known as a chemokine that was previously called monocyte-chemotactic protein 3 (MCP3). (wikipedia.org)
  • monocytes
  • CRS occurs when large numbers of white blood cells, including B cells, T cells, and natural killer cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and monocytes are activated and release inflammatory cytokines, which in turn activate yet more white blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines have been classed as lymphokines , interleukins , and chemokines , based on their presumed function, cell of secretion, or target of action. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • Cytokine is a monthly peer-reviewed academic journal covering the study of cytokines as they relate to multiple disciplines, including molecular biology, immunology, and genetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • adverse effect
  • The term arose in the field of pathophysiology in discussions of immune disorders in 1993, was extended to discussions of infectious disease and sepsis, and has been used to describe severe manifestations of cytokine release syndrome, an adverse effect of some drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • Typically, immune cells detect major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presented on infected cell surfaces, triggering cytokine release, causing lysis or apoptosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • maturation
  • cytokines modulate the balance between humoral and cell-based immune responses, and they regulate the maturation, growth, and responsiveness of particular cell populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • They were given the name "cytokine-induced killer" because cultivation with certain cytokines is mandatory for the maturation into terminally differentiated CIK cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cytokines strongly stimulate the proliferation and maturation into CIK cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • a given cytokine may be produced by more than one type of cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2003 report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine published by researchers at Imperial College London demonstrates the possibility of preventing a cytokine storm by inhibiting or disabling T cell response. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cytokine-induced killer cells or CIK cells are a group of immune effector cells featuring a mixed T- and natural killer (NK) cell-like phenotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many IL-11 functions associated with cell growth and differentiation suggest a role for this cytokine in cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • In contrast, some cytokines (such as IL-6) circulate in picomolar (10 -12 M) concentrations that can increase up to 1,000 times during trauma or infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • A cytokine storm, also known as cytokine cascade and hypercytokinemia, is a potentially fatal immune reaction consisting of a positive feedback loop between cytokines and white blood cells, with highly elevated levels of various cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • certain
  • I want to look at the cytokine (TNF's/IL's/IFN's) response to certain bacterial infections, and I would like some info on how different groups have gone about doing this. (bio.net)
  • Cytokine storm may also be induced by certain medications, such as the CD20 antibody rituximab and the CD19 antibody tisagenlecleucel. (wikipedia.org)