• Charles Murray is a publicity genius, and the publication of his and Richard Herrnstein's book, The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life , in the fall of 1994 was his masterpiece. (slate.com)
  • T he Bell Curve was not circulated in galleys before publication. (slate.com)
  • The Bell Curve isn't a typical work of trade nonfiction. (slate.com)
  • Herrnstein and Murray didn't do this, so it wasn't until a full year or more after The Bell Curve was published that the leading experts on its subject had a chance to go through the underlying data with care. (slate.com)
  • Therefore, as time went on, the knowledgeability of the Bell Curve discussion grew, but the attention paid to that discussion inevitably shrank. (slate.com)
  • It wasn't until late 1995 that the most damaging criticism of The Bell Curve began to appear, in tiny academic journals. (slate.com)
  • The Bell Curve , it turns out, is full of mistakes ranging from sloppy reasoning to mis-citations of sources to outright mathematical errors. (slate.com)
  • F irst, a quick précis of The Bell Curve . (slate.com)
  • Written throughout four years of extensive research by Richard Herrnstein and Charles Murray , The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life is a comprehensive treatment of its stated subject matter. (everything2.com)
  • They give a brief history of intelligence and the science of psychometrics (the study and measurement of the human mind), which they then use to define the terms and foundations for the rest of The Bell Curve . (everything2.com)
  • These statements underlie the rest of The Bell Curve and are necessary truths to make its analyses valid . (everything2.com)
  • The first part of The Bell Curve discusses the effects of intelligence at the top of the cognitive ability distribution . (everything2.com)
  • For decades, HR professionals have assumed that employee performance can be tracked using the bell curve model with equal numbers of people falling on either side of the mean. (shrm.org)
  • In a study of more than 600,000 individuals, researchers found that individual performance doesn't unfold on a bell curve, or 'normal distribution,' at all. (shrm.org)
  • Entering information into the first worksheet (Case Data) will automatically construct an epi curve in the second worksheet (Epi Curve). (cdc.gov)
  • Construct the epi curve from the line list below. (cdc.gov)
  • 7. The Flaw of the Bell Shaped Curve Histogram of S&P 500 Monthly Returns - January 1926 to November 2008 Lognormal Distribution CurveNumber of Occurrences Returns Source: Paul D. Kaplan, "Déja Vu All Over Again," in Morningstar Advisor , February/March 2009 Performance data shown represents past performance. (slideshare.net)
  • See Quick Learn: Using an Epi Curve and Epidemic Curves Ahead external icon for information on interpreting an epi curve. (cdc.gov)
  • If the incubation period of an illness is short, the interval on the epi curve might be indicated in hours or even minutes. (cdc.gov)
  • An epi curve is a visual display of the onset of illness among cases associated with an outbreak. (cdc.gov)
  • An epi curve should have a title that describes it, including the type of illness, the place where the outbreak occurred, and the time period. (cdc.gov)
  • Beck appeared on German TV last Monday, after the "Swindle" film was shown, and he is announced to appear on the program "Report München" in the first channel of public German TV next Monday (18 June), to educate the viewers about another of his fantasy graphs, namely his CO2 curve . (realclimate.org)
  • In The Age Curve , marketing guru Kenneth Gronbach shows executives and entrepreneurs how to anticipate this wave of predictable demand and ride it to success. (amanet.org)
  • This curve shows how information is lost over time when there is no attempt to retain it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beck's curve shows a warm phase 400 BC and the next one 1200 AD - that's 1600 years difference, so it just about fits. (realclimate.org)
  • Two weeks ago, we published the first lesson in curve manipulation taught by German school teacher and would-be scientist E.G. Beck: How to make it appear as if the Medieval times were warmer than today, even if all scientific studies come to the opposite conclusion. (realclimate.org)
  • Today we publish curve manipulation, lesson 2: How to make it appear as if 20th Century warming fits into a 1500-year cycle. (realclimate.org)
  • Light curve of the asteroid 201 Penelope based on images taken on 6 October 2006 at Mount John University Observatory . (wikipedia.org)
  • Light curves can be periodic, as in the case of eclipsing binaries , Cepheid variables , other periodic variables, and transiting extrasolar planets , or aperiodic , like the light curve of a nova , a cataclysmic variable star , a supernova or a microlensing event or binary as observed during occultation events. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study of the light curve, together with other observations, can yield considerable information about the physical process that produces it or constrain the physical theories about it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some types such as Cepheids have extremely regular light curves with exactly the same period, amplitude, and shape in each cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Others such as Mira variables have somewhat less regular light curves with large amplitudes of several magnitudes, while the semiregular variables are less regular still and have smaller amplitudes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The shapes of variable star light curves give valuable information about the underlying physical processes producing the brightness changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • For pulsating stars, the amplitude or period of the pulsations can be related to the luminosity of the star, and the light curve shape can be an indicator of the pulsation mode. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light curves from supernovae can be indicative of the type of supernova. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although supernova types are defined on the basis of their spectra, each has typical light curve shapes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light curves are helpful for classification of faint supernovae and for the determination of sub-types. (wikipedia.org)
  • In planetary science , a light curve can be used to derive the rotation period of a minor planet , moon , or comet nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, astronomers measure the amount of light produced by an object as a function of time (the light curve). (wikipedia.org)
  • The time separation of peaks in the light curve gives an estimate of the rotational period of the object. (wikipedia.org)
  • The difference between the maximum and minimum brightnesses (the amplitude of the light curve) can be due to the shape of the object, or to bright and dark areas on its surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB) of the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) uses a numeric code to assess the quality of a period solution for minor planet light curves (it does not necessarily assess the actual underlying data). (wikipedia.org)
  • U = 1 → Result based on fragmentary light curve(s), may be completely wrong. (wikipedia.org)
  • Light curves can be periodic, as in the case of eclipsing binaries , cepheid variables and other periodic variables, or aperiodic , like the light curve of a nova , a cataclysmic variable star , a supernova or a microlensing event . (princeton.edu)
  • [ 2 ] When the light curve covers an extended period of time, it is called a secular light curve. (princeton.edu)
  • The point on the curve where these two differing slopes meet is called the light saturation point and is where the light-dependent reactions are producing more ATP and NADPH than can be utilized by the light-independent reactions . (princeton.edu)
  • Since photosynthesis is also limited by ambient carbon dioxide levels, light curves are often repeated at several different constant carbon dioxide concentrations. (princeton.edu)
  • Generally speaking, the curve balloons when the underlying item offers greater returns and contracts when it offers lower returns compared to risk. (investopedia.com)
  • In mathematics, a curve (also called a curved line in older texts) is, generally speaking, an object similar to a line but that need not be straight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angle and curvature constraints are most often added to the ends of a curve, and in such cases are called end conditions . (wikipedia.org)
  • In the eighteenth century came the beginnings of the theory of plane algebraic curves, in general. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curves, or at least their graphical representations, are simple to create, for example by a stick in the sand on a beach. (wikipedia.org)
  • You can create an epi curve using the Generate an Epi Curve excel icon [2 sheets] template. (cdc.gov)
  • When you are finished, you will be able to create an epidemic curve, or "epi curve. (cdc.gov)
  • Virtually unlimited number of independent variables in a Multivariate curve fit (multiple regression). (wavemetrics.com)
  • Excessive lordosis may cause an extreme inward curve in the lower back. (spineuniverse.com)
  • There is debate among supporters of the hypothesis about the shape of the curve for events and facts that are more significant to the subject. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solutions to variational problems, such as the brachistochrone and tautochrone questions, introduced properties of curves in new ways (in this case, the cycloid). (wikipedia.org)
  • The curve widget allows a user to edit a curve covering a range of values. (google.com)
  • A simple example of a curve is the parabola, shown to the right. (wikipedia.org)
  • I'm not endorsing his curve, by the way, I have no idea where it comes from - I'm just playing along with it for the sake of the argument). (realclimate.org)