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  • organs
  • subhuman creatures with usable organs but no head, no brain, no consciousness to identify them with the human family? (brightkite.com)
  • They are master cells, capable of morphing into cells in the brain, muscles, or other organs, and which might be used for medical treatment. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Read by hundreds of thousands of people, here are a large number of useful human cloning resources, articles, videos - and comments by other students - about the future of human cloning, what is cloning, how to clone, cloning animals, cloning humans, cloning organs, therapeutic cloning. (globalchange.com)
  • In the normal course of gestation, these cells will divide and split off from one another to become every cell in the human body, forming the various organs and tissues. (jewishvaluescenter.org)
  • This area of research helps to understand what is involved in keeping human and animal organs and systems functioning. (tamu.edu)
  • Some believe that it is possible to grow human organs outside a body, or perhaps in the body of another animal, that could then be harvested for transplanting into humans. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • Human cloning techniques, for whatever purposes, whether legal or not, are unlikely to become a routine part of mainstream healthcare, even in the still public systems of Western Europe or the privatised ones of the United States and even if the current predominant claim of 'benefits' - creating in the laboratory body-compatible cells to replace failing cells or organs - are ever realised and safety concerns (such as tumours) allayed. (thecornerhouse.org.uk)
  • Coaxing these "blank", juvenile cells into specialized liver or blood cells, for example, holds the promise of curing disease or repairing damaged organs. (medindia.net)
  • Aaron Levine, a bioethicist at Georgia Tech, said that the biggest impact of cloning on human health is likely to come from animals raised to produce organs, tissue or biological drugs that will not be rejected by the human immune system. (medindia.net)
  • Researchers are using reproductive cloning to genetically change pigs so their organs would escape immune attack after transplant into humans. (whyfiles.org)
  • In the May 13 Guest Column, "The medical solution we've been waiting for," a seventh grade student lauded the benefits of human cloning for the purpose of providing our personal supply of spare organs for transplants, and as a resource for cells, to treat disease without the complication of rejection. (willistonobserver.com)
  • stem cell
  • He explains the processes involved in stem-cell research, research cloning, and reproductive cloning. (brightkite.com)
  • On the other side, the Catholic church, which has spearheaded opposition to embryonic stem cell research here, argues that embryos used for stem cell research are a form of human life. (gothamgazette.com)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the University of Oregon was the first to succeed in making a human stem cell line for research into therapy development. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • I am convinced that stem cell technology can become in the future a cure for conditions leading to brain injury -- but I think we have a long way to go. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Think of an embryonic stem cell as a kind of master cell, an early-stage cell that retains the ability to form almost any kind of cell or tissue type in the human body. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • The issue captured headlines more than a year ago when President George W. Bush restricted federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research to a select number of existing cell lines. (beliefnet.com)
  • Everyone told us that embryonic stem cell research is her best hope for a cure. (beliefnet.com)
  • Congress hasn't acted on any stem cell research bills, or a bill to ban human cloning, and Ortiz said there was still a question over whether California's law would be pre-empted by a federal statute. (beliefnet.com)
  • Measures pending in Congress range from allowing research to criminalizing it and prosecuting those who traveled abroad for treatment derived from stem cell research. (beliefnet.com)
  • and, No one is being punished if you are not doing human Embryonic Stem Cell Research (ESCR) with tax dollars. (missourilife.org)
  • Even though stem cell experiments conducted on animal models show much hope and promise in miracle cures, extreme caution has to be excised before this excitement can be translated to practical human clinicalapplications. (bio-medicine.org)
  • A few years ago, in an article in the The Times of London newspaper, the author, Michael Gove, made the following statement: "Embryonic stem-cell experimentation involves not just the destruction of human life but the creation of life with the specific intent to destroy it. (jewishvaluescenter.org)
  • If embryonic stem-cell research offers real possibilities for future cures then, from a Jewish point of view, it may be pursued with caution, humility, and strict supervision. (jewishvaluescenter.org)
  • so-called therapeutic cloning for embryonic stem cell research (which has thus far failed to deliver while technology using adult stem cells and cord blood, though relatively unresourced, goes from strength to strength) and animal-human hybrids (now a farcical footnote in history). (cmf.org.uk)
  • The Massachusetts Legislature overturned Gov. Mitt Romney's veto of the stem-cell research bill that redefines the beginning of life as the time of implantation in the womb and paves the way for cloning. (thebostonpilot.com)
  • Although embryonic stem-cell research has not resulted in the cure of any disease, supporters of the law hope this research will lead to cures and that Massachusetts will be at the forefront of the effort. (thebostonpilot.com)
  • It is hoped that stem cell therapy (also known as cell replacement therapy) may provide the elusive treatment that either halts the progress of the disease or provides a cure. (eu.com)
  • Any stem cell research that requires the destruction of human life is unethical. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Q: Is there a link between IVF and embryonic stem cell research and human cloning? (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • The recent report from Seoul Korea on the production of a stem cell line from a cloned human blastocyst has reignited both interest and anxiety regarding the development of this technology. (inciid.org)
  • Up until this point, Cosima's mysterious symptoms were being kept in check by an equally mysterious treatment-a stem cell therapy initially derived from the baby tooth of her niece Kira Manning ( Skyler Wexler ). (sciencevshollywood.com)
  • Ultimately, the use of cloning and stem cell technologies could lead to the growth of replacement tissue in laboratories, which would avoid all the usual transplant problems of rejection. (bbc.co.uk)
  • These newly formed tissues are then implanted into the patient in order to cure this disease are of (Stem Cell Therapy). (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • And everyone should, because stem-cell research brings up issues like where your tax money goes, who you vote for, your family's health and even your most fundamental beliefs about what makes us human. (wired.com)
  • Despite the hype, embryonic stem cell research has not yielded one successful human treatment! (willistonobserver.com)
  • Posts in this category pertain to abortion, human cloning, embryonic stem cell research, and other issues pertaining to the advancement of the culture of life and to the respect and protection of the sanctity of life. (chipbennett.net)
  • The measure specifically bans human cloning, but would permit all federally allowed stem cell research in the state. (chipbennett.net)
  • The San Jose Business Journal wrote about how the lack of lab space is delaying the development of cures based on embryonic stem cell research. (blogspot.com)
  • All available stem cell lines are contaminated with mouse feeder cells, making their therapeutic use for humans uncertain. (ontheissues.org)
  • India has established a booming industry in stem cell banking, which involves storing a patient's stem cells with the aim of possibly using them for future medical treatments. (pewforum.org)
  • South Korea 's reputation as a leader in stem cell research suffered a significant blow in 2006 when it was discovered that the country's leading biomedical researcher, Dr. Hwang Woo-suk, falsely claimed that he was the first scientist to clone human embryonic stem cells for the purpose of clinical trials. (pewforum.org)
  • Despite the scandal, the South Korean government continues to promote therapeutic cloning for stem cell research, although reproductive cloning is forbidden. (pewforum.org)
  • But that powerful profit motive hasn't pushed stem-cell research quickly toward to development of new treatments. (seattletimes.com)
  • Chuck Murry, a human-embryonic-stem-cell researcher at the University of Washington who has used the cells to grow human heart tissue in rats, believes it could take 20 years before the first stem-cell-based treatment could arrive five to 10 years to get ready for tests in humans and then several years in human testing. (seattletimes.com)
  • biotechnology
  • Randy Prather, distinguished professor in reproductive biotechnology in MU's College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, said mice previously had been bred with the disease. (columbiatribune.com)
  • Biotechnology has contributed towards the exploitation of biological organisms or biological processes through modern techniques, which could be profitably used in medicine, agriculture, animal husbandry and environmental cloning. (bionity.com)
  • The most practical use of biotechnology, which is still present today, is the cultivation of plants to produce food suitable to humans. (bionity.com)
  • Research in reproductive physiology is focused on understanding the requirements for normal embryonic development, in addition to the development and application of animal biotechnology. (tamu.edu)
  • mice
  • Mice have been successfully cloned from another mouse which died 16 years ago, whose intact body was frozen at minus 20 degrees centigrade (1st November 2008). (globalchange.com)
  • Clones have been produced in several other species like mice and calves, but in every species in which cloning has been successful in producing live offspring, there has been a high incidence of abnormalities in the offspring. (inciid.org)
  • successfully
  • Then, when patients elsewhere are successfully treated using therapeutic cloning, Canadians will beg Parliament to change our law -- too late. (fightaging.org)
  • So far no gene therapy trial has shown any dramatic effect on patients, and no one knows enough about the genetics of normal human traits to have any hope of successfully tinkering with them. (dhushara.com)
  • scientist
  • It is also one of the first therapeutic cloning projects to be started since the disgrace of Woo Suk Hwang, the South Korean scientist found last year to have faked his data. (endowmentmed.org)
  • A scientist, who is a member of the South Korean team that cloned human embryos to destroy them for their stem cells, cast cold water on hopes for cures. (endeavourforum.org.au)
  • The scientist, Ahn Curie, a doctor of transplantation medicine at Seoul National University Hospital, said patients should be very patient before expecting miracle cures from the controversial cells. (endeavourforum.org.au)
  • Given that the scientist were not able to predict that the cloned cat was going to be different from the original cat, it is safe to assume (and probably proved) the same happens for cloned plants. (metafilter.com)
  • A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. (kwit.org)
  • 1997
  • In the year 1997, the first ever successful process of cloning took place in Scotland. (essaysprofessors.com)
  • The longest a human has ever been proven to live is 122 years, the case of Jeanne Calment who was born in 1875 and died in 1997, whereas the maximum lifespan of a wildtype mouse , commonly used as a model in research on aging, is about three years. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • There are whole areas of tissues you can't get at, but which human embryonic stem cells almost certainly will develop daily," Weissman said. (fightaging.org)
  • Apart from the fact that there is no genetically exact match for cells and tissues obtained in this way (due most probably to the difference in mitochondrial DNA), there is the serious moral objection that a genetically human being is allowed to grow and then dismembered. (stemcellresearch.org)
  • clinical
  • The use of normal, cloned human liver cells to test new drugs under development for certain toxic metabolites, for example, would reduce the danger of human clinical trials by eliminating such compounds before human testing. (bio.org)
  • Our goals are to understand the mechanism of transcriptional up-regulation of the bcl-xl gene in this tumor, and to find a more effective clinical treatment for malignant mesothelioma. (survivingmesothelioma.com)
  • The ailments of the DNA donors selected for research also provides insight into the possible nature of the first clinical applications of therapeutic cloning: Nine of the 11 embryonic cell lines came from DNA of people with spinal cord injuries. (courant.com)
  • Have you or a member of your immediate family benefited from a clinical trial or treatment using adult or cord blood stem cells? (stemcellresearch.org)
  • Not there will not be psychosis cloning and all that irritation of accutane same in kamagra oral jelly uk the techniques clinical laser. (guimaq.com.br)
  • ethically
  • Yet it is predictable that cloned children as products of ethically dubious asexual reproduction will be viewed by some as inferior, much the way that many people once looked down on children born out of wedlock. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • Human cloning -- complicated, risky and ethically contentious -- has largely been replaced as the holy grail of regenerative medicine by other technologies, say experts. (medindia.net)
  • pigs
  • Through the cloning of manufactured mutated pig cells, Prather and a team at MU created pigs with one copy of the mutated gene that can cause cystic fibrosis. (columbiatribune.com)
  • Severino Antinori
  • According to Severino Antinori and Panos Zavos, the purpose of the cloning is to help infertile couples have a child, specifically to counter male sterility. (zavos.org)
  • theoretically
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • AD, that is theoretically possible (although nobody has yet grown a human clone, as far as we know). (whyfiles.org)
  • South Korean
  • The South Korean team took skin cells from donors and then implanted them into donated human eggs that had been stripped of their own DNA. (courant.com)
  • copies
  • Soon, movie viewers see multiple copies or 'clones' of Keaton's character performing a variety of tasks, in order to streamline his life and give him more free time. (zavos.org)
  • Cloning can be done for the purpose of creating copies of people who are dead. (essaysprofessors.com)
  • But the key to such breakthroughs is cloning - producing copies of early-stage embryos from which stem cells can be taken. (bbc.co.uk)
  • At the point of transfer, the egg becomes diploid, meaning it now contains two copies of the DNA necessary to code for a human being. (cbhd.org)
  • When the sperm and egg unite, they form a cell with two copies of the total DNA necessary for a human being to develop (diploid). (cbhd.org)