Loading...
  • Cuban
  • Like the rest of the Cuban economy , Cuban medical care suffered following the end of Soviet subsidies in 1991 and the stepping up of the United States embargo against Cuba at this time also had an effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • After 1959, Cuban tourism was mostly for Cubans only, and the facilities were not renewed until the 1990s, when Cuba lost financial backing from the defunct Soviet Union and opened its doors to foreign tourism. (wikitravel.org)
  • 162 Yet, Cuban authorities have acknowledged that the government's decision to allow the formation and legal operation of Cuban NGOs (many of which are state-controlled institutions with an NGO moniker) stemmed principally from the government's interest in increasing the flow of foreign aid into Cuba. (hrw.org)
  • And while the U.S. government, in the text of the Helms-Burton law, has endorsed the toppling of the Castro government, Cuba should not penalize dissident groups that accept U.S. funds to distribute copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights or report on human rights violations-activities not designed to the promote violent overthrow of the current Cuban leadership-for the exercise of their protected rights. (hrw.org)
  • Going in a group is usually the best way for individuals who are unfamiliar with Cuba to learn more about the country, since groups have access to Cuban sites, organizations and events that are often not available to solo travelers. (google.com)
  • At the height of the Cold War, when the Cuban Revolution became a central concern, The Nation even played a key role in back-channel diplomacy to improve US-Cuba relations. (thenation.com)
  • The U.S. government and the American and Cuban people would like to see an end to the Cold War, but unfortunately the regime in Cuba would like to see it continue as can be seen by it smuggling tons of weapons to North Korea in 2013 and through Colombia in 2015. (miamiherald.com)
  • The Cuban trogon is the national bird of Cuba. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Living Ideology in Cuba , Katherine Gordy demonstrates how the Cuban state and its people engage in an ongoing negotiation that produces a "living ideology. (umich.edu)
  • Filmed in Cuba in the autumn of 2000, = the interviews are augmented with archival footage from Cuba and Cuban = prisons. (berkeley.edu)
  • While Florida has an undeniably vibrant Cuban culture, and strong tourist attractions in its own right, it's still not Cuba. (escapeartist.com)
  • Havana
  • Havana, Cuba (NTN24) Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff arrived in Havana on Monday (January 30) for a two-day visit focused on trade, but nagged by Cuba's ever-present human rights issues. (youtube.com)
  • British-Australian swimmer Penny Palfrey adjusts her cap in preparation for her bid to complete a record swim from Cuba to Florida as her husband Chris stands by, in Havana, Cuba, Friday, June 29, 2012. (yahoo.com)
  • FILE PHOTO: A man chats on the internet with his mobile device during sunset at a hotspot along the seafront in Havana, Cuba, July 14, 2018. (reuters.com)
  • Canadian businessman Sarkis Yacoubian goes to court for his corruption trial in Havana, Cuba, Friday, May 24, 2013. (yahoo.com)
  • HAVANA (AP) -- Official silence surrounded the case of a Canadian businessman targeted by a corruption probe in Cuba on Friday, as the initial trial of several foreigners suspected of graft entered its second day. (yahoo.com)
  • Canada's ambassador to Havana has been observing the proceedings, but Ottawa has also kept mum except to acknowledge that it is providing consular services to two of its citizens detained in Cuba. (yahoo.com)
  • Ciego de Av
  • Jose Ramirez stands in front of his house that he is asking $55,000 for, in the city of Ciego de Avila, central Cuba January 3, 2012. (reuters.com)
  • Cuba's
  • Privatization of healthcare in Cuba is illegal and unnecessary as high quality, equal, care covered by the state is available to everyone as made necessary by Cuba's constitution. (wikipedia.org)
  • Florida
  • Real has been imprisoned since 1994 when he and six other exiles came to Cuba from Florida to organise an armed uprising against the communist-led government. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • They had been recruited and trained in Florida by a group called the Democratic National Unity Party with the objective of going to Cuba, setting up in the Escambray mountains and launching a guerrilla movement "to destabilise the internal order," according to the government website . (telegraph.co.uk)
  • grandmother and veteran endurance swimmer, ended her quest early July 1 to become the first woman to swim unaided from Cuba to the Florida Keys , unable to close the gap on the last 26 miles of a more than 100-mile ocean odyssey. (yahoo.com)
  • While we like to think that walking around Cuba is like stepping into the past, one can get the opposite impression from Florida. (escapeartist.com)
  • Florida looks like the Cuba that never was. (escapeartist.com)
  • While Florida has been showered with golf courses, Cuba has had only one golf course for many years, and even that was run by the government. (escapeartist.com)
  • Passengers wait in line for a flight departing to Cuba at Miami International Airport in Miami, Florida, September 27, 2012. (voanews.com)
  • 1990s
  • In early December, the death sentences of Raul Ernesto Cruz Leon and Otto Rene Rodriguez Llerena, two Salvadorans who took part in 1990s hotel bombings in Cuba, were commuted to 30 years. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • visas
  • Cuba routinely denies visas to foreign journalists and human rights investigators in what appears to be an effort to avoid negative publicity. (hrw.org)
  • In October 1998 President Castro explained the conditions under which he would grant visas to reporters with U.S. news bureaus: 'If I were certain objective reporters would come to Cuba and not be biased beforehand, we would. (hrw.org)
  • cruisers
  • This was rendered manifest by the exasperated state of public feeling throughout our entire country, produced by the forcible search of American merchant vessels by British cruisers on the coast of Cuba , in the spring of 1858. (tufts.edu)
  • travel
  • I n the wake of relatively minor regulation changes and misleading news coverage, it's easy to be confused about the current state of travel to Cuba. (google.com)
  • The U.S. government has created 12 broadly inclusive categories of legal travel to Cuba, although " tourist activities " are not permitted. (google.com)
  • An official version of current U.S. regulations can be found on the U.S. Embassy in Cuba website, but more helpful information has been posted by numerous journalists and travel organizations. (google.com)
  • A number of them are linked to below this section and Amazon has a lengthy list of Cuba travel guides. (google.com)
  • A recent article from Forbes says "[travel to Cuba] was the easiest process ever. (google.com)
  • A bipartisan group of senators predicted Tuesday that Congress was ready to pass legislation to allow all Americans to travel to Cuba. (motherjones.com)
  • Specifically, as an American citizen today you can get to Cuba via the services of a travel group. (escapeartist.com)
  • Any US citizen intending to travel to Cuba can only do so with a license that has been issued by the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control. (iexplore.com)
  • Communist
  • Cuba has historically - both before and during Communist rule - performed better than other countries in the region on infant mortality and life expectancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a LINK to articles since April 21, 2001 about Cuba and the communist threat - CHILDREN'S CODE At this LINK is a LINK to many Elian articles. (freerepublic.com)
  • attacks
  • Doctors treating the victims of unexplained health attacks in Cuba have discovered abnormalities in the brain as they've searched for clues to how U.S. embassy workers developed such a vast array of symptoms, the Associated Press has learned. (usatoday.com)
  • Revolution
  • 2006 was designated the Year of the Energy Revolution in Cuba, and many small generators have been installed in an attempt to avoid blackouts. (wikitravel.org)
  • President Miguel Diaz-Canel, who succeeded Raul Castro in April, has championed greater connectivity, underscoring the potential for internet to boost the economy and enable Cuba to better defend its revolution online. (reuters.com)
  • Iran
  • Iran is loaning cash-strapped Cuba $26 Million. (voanews.com)
  • The newspaper says Iran will offer Cuba assistance and equipment to help it fight the effects of a drought plaguing the eastern portion of the island. (voanews.com)
  • destinations
  • They also had the opportunity to see a number of North American neotropical migrants-species that either spend the winter in Cuba or else stop there on their way to other tropical destinations. (massaudubon.org)
  • Species
  • This is a list of birds species recorded in the archipelago of Cuba which consists of the main island of Cuba and over 1000 smaller cays and islands . (wikipedia.org)
  • The avifauna of Cuba include a total of 384 species, of which 25 are endemic , 10 have been introduced by humans, and 163 are noted as accidental . (wikipedia.org)
  • E) Endemic - a species endemic to the archipelago of Cuba. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • In addition to imprisoning activists, Cuba employs other tactics to impede individuals and organizations from undertaking activities that are, or appear to be, in opposition to government policies or practices. (hrw.org)
  • Some of the listed organizations schedule only occasional trips to Cuba. (google.com)
  • government
  • Family members cannot accompany U.S. government employees who work in Cuba. (state.gov)
  • While the pope's January 1998 visit to Cuba marked a period of relative calm, government pressures increased as the year progressed and international attention faded. (hrw.org)
  • 161 But independent groups that criticize the government in nonviolent ways-whether through holding meetings, distributing 'Down with Fidel' signs, writing about economic conditions in Cuba, proposing open political debate, or documenting human rights abuses-are exercising fundamental rights to free expression and association. (hrw.org)
  • Brazilian sources have said the government favours a democratic opening in Cuba, but that it will not push hard. (youtube.com)
  • news
  • Of course, The Nation 's November 19, 1960, report on covert preparations to invade Cuba was news. (thenation.com)
  • boat
  • Cuba last applied the death penalty in 2003 when three people were executed by firing squad for seizing a boat with the intent of fleeing to Miami. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • economic
  • Economic and political ties between the two countries were deepened under Rousseff's predecessor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, but she has focused more on business issues since taking office last year and was expected to do the same with Cuba. (youtube.com)
  • tourist
  • Electricity outages have been common in Cuba, except in tourist facilities that have a generator. (wikitravel.org)
  • Most visitors to Cuba require a tourist visa which is valid for 30 days. (iexplore.com)
  • story
  • Just two weeks after its inaugural issue, on July 20, 1865, The Nation published its first Cuba story. (thenation.com)
  • Spain
  • Emancipation in Cuba" promoted a plan for "the important matter of the extinction of slavery in this island"-a moral, social and political issue that culminated with Spain decreeing the abolition of slavery in Cuba in 1886. (thenation.com)
  • I reiterate the recommendation contained in my Annual Message of December, 1858, and repeated in that of December, 1859, in favor of the acquisition of Cuba from Spain by fair purchase. (tufts.edu)
  • Spain prevents the trade in Cuba , though she acknowledges the mode by professing to prohibit it. (tufts.edu)
  • long
  • The Nation 's pre-emptive effort to inform and mobilize public opinion before the Bay of Pigs is illustrative of its long history of coverage and editorial positions on Cuba. (thenation.com)
  • While the enchanting island nation of Cuba has long been seen as an opponent touting a hostile political dichotomy, we travelers and cosmopolitans can't resist it. (escapeartist.com)
  • foreign
  • Again and again, the magazine has run groundbreaking stories and potent editorials to influence the public discourse over Cuba and US foreign policy. (thenation.com)
  • people
  • Too often, the people of Cuba and elsewhere appear as a wooden caricature, passive recipients of commandments from above rather than active protagonists in building a common future from below. (umich.edu)
  • conditions
  • Under Castro's tight controls and watchful eye, Cuba never had the conditions to propel it into such unrestrained development. (escapeartist.com)
  • doctors
  • Modern Western medicine has been practiced in Cuba by formally trained doctors since at least the beginning of the 19th century and the first surgical clinic was established in 1823. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cuba has had many world class doctors, including Carlos Finlay , whose mosquito-based theory of yellow fever transmission was given its final proof under the direction of Walter Reed , James Carroll , and Aristides Agramonte . (wikipedia.org)