• This first step in the creatine biosynthesis pathway was found to be rate-limiting as the respective enzyme L-arginine-glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT) is subject to feedback inhibition of creatine on a pretranslational stage [ 3 - 5 ]. (medsci.org)
  • The second enzyme in the pathway is GAA N -methyltransferase (GAMT), which catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S -adenosylmethionine (SAM) to GAA to form creatine and S -adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) mainly in the liver. (medsci.org)
  • Creatine is then released from the liver into the circulation where it can be taken up, via a specific transporter, by various tissues [ 6 ]. (medsci.org)
  • Athletes have also anecdotally reported decreased fatigue, decreased muscle soreness, and decreased recovery time while supplementing with creatine. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • It is well known that exogenous creatine can help to replenish cellular levels of creatine in physically actives, ageing population, and neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases [ 7 ], yet the power and safety of GAA as a nutritional additive for restoring creatine availability is unclear. (medsci.org)
  • Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) is a natural precursor of creatine, yet the potential use of GAA as a nutritional additive for restoring creatine availability in humans has been limited by unclear efficacy and safety after exogenous GAA administration. (medsci.org)
  • Guanidinoacetic acid (GAA) occurs naturally in the human body and acts as a precursor of creatine, the latter playing an important role as an energy carrier/mediator in the cell [ 1 , 2 ]. (medsci.org)
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