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  • Supreme
  • The AAFP is recognizing a Supreme Court decision upholding all provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, saying in a prepared statement that 'as a result of this decision, more Americans will have access to meaningful insurance coverage and to the primary care physicians who are key to high-quality, affordable health services. (aafp.org)
  • The AAFP is praising a Supreme Court decision upholding all provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (aafp.org)
  • In addition, the Supreme Court decision "maintains already launched initiatives that support wider implementation of the patient-centered medical home and that value primary medical care through payment incentives for primary care physicians," Stream said. (aafp.org)
  • By upholding the Affordable Care Act, the Supreme Court has ensured that all Americans have access to affordable, sustainable health care coverage and that they receive high-quality, coordinated and efficient care," said Stream. (aafp.org)
  • Justices
  • Unless otherwise noted, the Court generally hears two, one-hour oral arguments, with attorneys for each side of a case given 30 minutes to make a presentation to the Court and answer questions posed by the Justices. (supremecourt.gov)
  • Chester Arthur-who after a hacklike career surprised everyone as president by championing clean government-chose two meritorious justices, yet stumbled by naming his longtime sponsor, the former New York senator and political boss Roscoe Conkling, to a Supreme Court vacancy in 1882. (slate.com)
  • Although justices still counseled presidents on a range of matters, and presidents still placed their friends on the court, they now did so with less frequency and more difficulty. (slate.com)
  • Indeed, justices of the Supreme Court also sat as justices of the Exchequer Court in the early years. (wikipedia.org)
  • When asked about the kind of justices he would appoint to the Supreme Court, President Bill Clinton insisted that he had no litmus test for his justice, but at the same time, that he only wanted justices who would be pro-choice when it came to abortion. (wikipedia.org)
  • liberal
  • Only three years later, when he tried to elevate the justice to chief, did the mostly conservative critics of the Warren Court and its liberal jurisprudence seize on Fortas' continuing contacts with the president as a reason to filibuster his nomination , which they did successfully. (slate.com)
  • In 1875, the Liberal government of Prime Minister Alexander Mackenzie passed The Supreme and Exchequer Court Act (introduced by Minister of Justice Telesphore Fournier ), which was based on Macdonald's earlier unsuccessful bill of 1870. (wikipedia.org)
  • nonetheless
  • A former Yale Law School professor, a founding partner of the prestigious Washington firm Arnold, Fortas, and Porter, and an advocate before the high court, Fortas nonetheless owed his selection to his friendship with Lyndon Johnson, who in turn owed his 1948 Senate primary victory largely to Fortas' assistance. (slate.com)
  • Judgments
  • More significantly, an explosive investigation by CBS News has found that since 1988, the vaccine court has awarded money judgments, often in the millions of dollars, to thirteen hundred and twenty two families whose children suffered brain damage from vaccines. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • focuses
  • Explains Capizzi: "A very large part of my court focuses on children who are in my court by no fault of their own. (ibm.com)
  • Indeed, some critics say by moving against the generals now, the court is just seeking to deflect criticism that it focuses solely on the alleged misdeeds of the elected civilian government and wants to dislodge President Ali Zardari, with the supposed nod from the military itself. (yahoo.com)
  • appointments
  • With cries of cronyism greeting the nomination of Harriet Miers to the Supreme Court, the White House is appealing to history-saying, in effect, that there's a long and distinguished tradition of cronyism in Supreme Court appointments. (slate.com)
  • President Bill Clinton made two appointments to the Supreme Court of the United States , both during his first term. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comedy
  • The Emmy®-winning comedy continues its lighthearted look at the crazy cases and characters that appear in night court in mid-1980s New York City, where anything - and everything - happens. (apple.com)
  • Claims
  • The U.S. Embassy did not report the computers stolen, and a U.S. State Department statement presented to the court said the embassy had no claims against Marynich. (rferl.org)
  • continues
  • A federal judge in Delaware threatened TransPerfect Global Inc. CEO Philip R. Shawe with a nationwide filing injunction Friday if he continues to pursue litigation stemming from the court-ordered sale of his translation-services company. (law.com)
  • federal
  • This article is about the federal court before it was split in 2003. (wikipedia.org)
  • During pre-Confederation negotiations, the creation of a national court had been contemplated to deal with matters relating to federal law. (wikipedia.org)
  • It replaced both the Federal Court of India and the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council which were then at the apex of the Indian court system. (wikipedia.org)
  • On February 12, the federal "Vaccine Court" in Washington issued a sweeping ruling in three highly touted "test cases" against families who claimed that their childrens' autism had been caused by vaccines. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • petition
  • The court is acting on a petition filed in 1996 by former Air Vice Marshal Asghar Khan, demanding it investigate what he claimed were payments to right-wing politicians made by the army-run Inter-Services Intelligence spy agency, known as the ISI. (yahoo.com)
  • provision
  • The Supreme Court of Washington's judgment-that the "right to travel" provision of the 1855 Treaty Between the United States and the Yakama Nation of Indians pre-empts the State's fuel tax as applied to Cougar Den's importation of fuel by public highway for sale within the reservation-is affirmed. (supremecourt.gov)
  • democratic
  • However, reforms in 1994 and 2003 have improved the democratic character of the Court. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1963, the following democratic government, of Arturo Illia ( UCRP ), also attempted to increase the numerical composition of the Supreme Court. (wikipedia.org)
  • conservative
  • They oppose her at their peril,' Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said of his GOP colleagues and conservative activists who are leading the court fight. (washingtonpost.com)
  • help
  • Whereas on Court TV the camera couldn't help itself, panning in twitchy reflex to the stone-cold defendant. (nymag.com)
  • Watson is a prime example of how technology can help court systems do a better job for the community and citizens that they serve. (ibm.com)
  • Court staff will help you determine the correct Court action for your situation. (phoenix.gov)
  • Establishment
  • Pakistan's powerful military establishment is under rare scrutiny from the country's top court, which after a gap of 16 years has opened an investigation into allegations it funneled money to politicians in the 1990's to influence elections. (yahoo.com)
  • history
  • Throughout much of the history of the United States, the Supreme Court of the United States was considered the least powerful branch of the government, and nominations to that body, although important, were not the source of great political controversy as they are today. (wikipedia.org)
  • business
  • MOSCOW (AP) - The Moscow City Court on Thursday reduced the prison sentences of former oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky and his business partner by two years, which means they will be released in 2014. (yahoo.com)
  • Senate
  • After an angry Senate refused to confirm Taney as treasury secretary, Jackson vowed to strike back, and when a high court vacancy opened in 1835, he did. (slate.com)
  • The members of the Supreme Court are appointed by the President with the agreement of at least two thirds of the present Senate members in a session convened for that purpose, and can only be removed by an impeachment process called juicio político ("political trial"), initiated by the Chamber of Deputies and carried out by the Senate, exclusively on grounds of improper behaviour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Senate Republicans responded with restraint to the announcement yesterday, and their largely muted statements stood in sharp contrast to the fractious partisanship that has defined court battles in recent decades. (washingtonpost.com)
  • Senate Democrats, meanwhile, who are on the verge of controlling a filibuster-proof 60-vote majority in the Senate, warned Republicans of the dangers of pushing too hard against Obama's first court pick. (washingtonpost.com)
  • prison
  • Marynich being led into court 31 December 2004 -- A prominent Belarusian opposition figure was sentenced to five years in prison yesterday after being convicted by a Minsk court of stealing computers belonging to the U.S. Embassy. (rferl.org)
  • session
  • The Court convenes for a session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. (supremecourt.gov)
  • The session may begin with the announcement of opinions - decisions in argued cases - followed by the swearing in of new members to the Bar of the Supreme Court. (supremecourt.gov)
  • Among his many duties is overseeing the juvenile treatment court, a weekly specialty court session that seeks to aid juveniles who are addicted to drugs. (ibm.com)
  • previous
  • The Court of Cassation was provided by the former Italian Civil Code in 1865 and then it was reorganized by royal decree 12 on 30 January 1941, supplanting the previous court. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • In these years, no one presumed an iron wall should exist between the Supreme Court and party politics. (slate.com)
  • But nine years later Harry S. Truman was given hell-accused of rank favoritism-when he nominated to the high court his attorney general, Tom C. Clark (father of Ramsey), a political ally in several key fights. (slate.com)
  • In formative years, the supreme court met from 10 to 12 in the morning and then 2 to 4 in the afternoon for 28 days in a month. (wikipedia.org)
  • Judge Anthony Capizzi has served the Montgomery County Juvenile Court for more than 13 years. (ibm.com)
  • The court is also demanding answers from the army and spy agencies over the fate of hundreds of "missing" Pakistanis: suspected militants or separatists picked up and held by military authorities for months and years in secret detentions. (yahoo.com)
  • Services
  • But last week, the parents of yet another child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were awarded a lump sum of more than $810,000 (plus an estimated $30-40,000 per year for autism services and care) in compensation by the Court, which ruled that the measels-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine had caused acute brain damage that led to his autism spectrum disorder. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • government
  • Analysts say the developments are part of jostling between the army, the court and the government, with each wanting to stake a claim on its sphere of influence. (yahoo.com)
  • The Times , which has made itself a blind mouthpiece for HRSA and a leading defender of vaccine safety, joined crowing government and vaccine industry flacks applauding the decisions like giddy cheerleaders, rooting for the same court that many of these same voices viscously derided just one year ago, after Hannah Poling won compensation for her vaccine induced autism. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • power
  • The Delaware Court of Chancery on Monday dismissed an investor suit stemming from a conflicted transaction that extended power giant NRG Energy's control over a subsidiary, finding that minority shareholders had overwhelmingly approved the deal. (law.com)
  • care
  • Neale Court is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 23 older people or people living with dementia. (cqc.org.uk)
  • Write to Word Court in care of The Atlantic Monthly , 77 North Washington Street, Boston, MA02114, or send E-mail to MsGrammar@theatlantic.com . (theatlantic.com)
  • national
  • Fortunately for the youth who attend Capizzi's juvenile treatment court, the judge also serves on several national organizations and industry groups. (ibm.com)