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  • risk of corneal
  • In fact, your risk of corneal ulcerations increases tenfold when using extended-wear (overnight) soft contact lenses. (webmd.com)
  • Of note, patients with a poor corneal surface are at increased risk of corneal infection, especially those with systemic diseases in whom keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye syndrome) is also often present. (medscape.com)
  • epithelial
  • A corneal abrasion heals by the movement of neighboring epithelial cells, which slide over the wounded area, and through a cell division process called mitosis, which fill in the abraded area with new epithelial cells. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A healing of a corneal ulcer involves two processes: migration of surrounding epithelial cells followed by mitosis (dividing) of the cells, and introduction of blood vessels from the conjunctiva . (wikipedia.org)
  • abrasion occurs
  • When a corneal abrasion occurs, the conjunctiva, or the white of the eye, turns red, as new blood vessels form and those present enlarge, in an attempt to increase blood flow to the eye as it attempts to bring to the eye those cells needed for the healing of the cornea. (encyclopedia.com)
  • A corneal abrasion occurs when something scratches, cuts, or brushes up against the cornea. (rchsd.org)
  • When a corneal abrasion occurs either from the contact lens itself or another source, the injured cornea is much more susceptible to this type of bacterial infection than a non-contact lens user's would be. (wikipedia.org)
  • femtosecond laser
  • This article discusses the advantages and limitations for surgical compensation of presbyopia with the femtosecond laser using corneal inlays and the Intracor technique. (modernmedicine.com)
  • Dr. Keith Walter presents his procedure for corneal tattooing by using the femtosecond laser to create a small pocket in the cornea. (aao.org)
  • superficial
  • Visual acuity eventually becomes reduced during the second and third decades of life following a progressive superficial haze and an irregular corneal surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • inlays
  • Three corneal inlays are in clinical use for improving near vision in phakic presbyopic patients with low refractive spherical equivalent. (modernmedicine.com)
  • Corneal inlays to correct refractive errors are not new-various materials have been tried for more than 50 years to correct blurred vision. (modernmedicine.com)
  • The prospect of an expanding armamentarium of corneal inlays for presbyopia correction is an exciting development, said Jay A. Pepose, MD, PhD. (modernmedicine.com)
  • Disease
  • Our research is focussing on using stem cells to grow corneal cells to enable the vision of more dogs to be restored following corneal injury or disease. (aht.org.uk)
  • What are the causes and risk factors of corneal disease? (medicinenet.com)
  • The causes of corneal disease vary widely. (medicinenet.com)
  • In many people, prompt treatment of a corneal disease in its early stages will minimize the severity of the disease and its complications. (medicinenet.com)
  • The second type is a much more aggressive, frequently bilateral, relentless disease usually seen in younger patients that is poorly responsive to any therapy and often leads to corneal destruction. (medscape.com)
  • presbyopia
  • According to several presentations given during the American Society of Cataracts and Refractive Surgery 2014 meeting, the investigational Raindrop (ReVision Optics) transparent hydrogel corneal inlay has shown to be consistently effective for the correction of presbyopia, is relatively easy to implant, and has high patient satisfaction. (modernmedicine.com)
  • A surgeon undergoing implantation of a corneal inlay to treat presbyopia enjoys the same visual benefits as his patients with the device. (modernmedicine.com)
  • degeneration
  • Elevated mass lesions of the cornea are relatively rare and the clinical differential diagnoses include Salzmann's nodular degeneration, subepithelial amyloid deposits, and corneal keloid, primary or secondary tumors of the cornea. (healio.com)
  • limbus
  • Ophthalmic examination revealed a raised lesion with gelatinous appearance present at the nasal corneal limbus. (healio.com)
  • occur
  • As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. (wikipedia.org)