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  • emotions
  • Rachel is at risk for self-mutilation to provide relief from tension or emotions due to emotional dysregulation caused by past sexual abuse. (prezi.com)
  • Emotional eating is defined as the "propensity to eat in response to positive and negative emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the term emotional eating often refers to eating as a means of coping with negative emotions, it also includes eating for positive emotions such as eating foods when celebrating an event or eating to enhance an already good mood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most frequently, people refer to emotional eating as "eating to cope with negative emotions. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these situations, emotional eating can be considered a form of disordered eating which is defined as "an increase in food intake in response to negative emotions" and can be considered a maladaptive strategy. (wikipedia.org)
  • While these individuals typically limit what they eat, when they are faced with negative emotions they cope by engaging in emotional eating. (wikipedia.org)
  • Together these three theories suggest that an individual's aversion to negative emotions, particularly negative feelings that arise in response to a threat to the ego or intense self-awareness , increase the propensity for the individual to utilize emotional eating as a means of coping with this aversion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The idea that your emotions impact your health and the development of disease is not new. (mercola.com)
  • Yet, they fall behind on understanding others' emotions, theory of mind and moral development. (focusonemotions.nl)
  • Chronic
  • In fact, emotional stress is linked to health problems including chronic inflammation, lowered immune function, increased blood pressure, altered brain chemistry, blood sugar and hormonal balance, and increased tumor growth. (mercola.com)
  • feelings
  • Giving in to a craving or eating because of stress can cause feelings of regret, shame, or guilt, and these responses tend to be associated with emotional hunger. (wikipedia.org)
  • The inadequate affect regulation theory posits that individuals engage in emotional eating because they believe overeating alleviates negative feelings. (wikipedia.org)
  • likely
  • Even the conservative Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated that 85 percent of all diseases appear to have an emotional element, but the actual percentage is likely to be even higher. (mercola.com)
  • Emotional stress likely triggers cancer in a multi-faceted way. (mercola.com)
  • disease
  • The findings seem to show for the first time that the conditions for developing the disease can be affected by your emotional environment, including everyday work and family stress. (mercola.com)
  • That is why an effective strategy to manage your emotional stress has long been a part of my 12 top cancer-prevention tools, and this is because there is overwhelming evidence that your mind does matter when it comes to preventing, or triggering, disease. (mercola.com)
  • reduce
  • This new economy must be based on principles and strategies that contribute to human well-being, such as family-friendly policies, meaningful and democratic work, and community wealth-building activities to minimize the widening income gap and reduce poverty. (opendemocracy.net)