Loading...
  • method
  • If young men could ensure their ability to father children by depositing their sperm in a sperm bank, they would be more likely to consider a vasectomy as a method of birth control, the authors say: "If successful reversal could be 'guaranteed,' young men who have never fathered children might become candidates for vasectomy, thus transforming it into a new method of reversible male contraception. (stanford.edu)
  • available
  • Because this is the only new approach to male contraception likely to become available in the foreseeable future, the military services should set up a large-scale sperm cryopreservation program in order to create public confidence in the approach, and to work out its technical, legal and ethical aspects, a Stanford chemist says. (stanford.edu)
  • developments
  • Fortunately, recent developments have made it possible to achieve reversible male contraception through a combination of existing technologies, the scientists say. (stanford.edu)
  • Research
  • The absence of serious research and development in male contraception among the major pharmaceutical companies, combined with the fact that the process of developing, testing and regulatory approval of a truly novel male contraceptive requires 15 to 20 years, means that the prospect for a "male pill" is "dismal" even after the year 2010, the authors conclude. (stanford.edu)
  • form
  • But recent techniques and data indicate that the previously considered but rejected option of collecting and preserving sperm prior to the operation make this combination of technologies the only new form of reliable male contraception that can be introduced within the next decade, Djerassi and Leibo argue. (stanford.edu)
  • Condom
  • If women know how to recognize their fertility cycles , they stand a much better chance of knowing whether the broken condom/contraception-less act will actually result in conception, or whether the time is just not right for that. (everything2.com)
  • sterilization
  • Irondale, AL, June 17, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- U.S. District Court Judge Callie V.S. Granade of Mobile, Ala. issued an opinion on June 17 denying EWTN Global Catholic Network protection from the government mandate that it must provide coverage of contraception, abortion-inducing drugs and sterilization as part of its employee health care coverage. (cnbc.com)
  • As an organization that was founded to uphold the teachings of the Catholic Church, we do not believe that contraception, abortion-inducing drugs and voluntary sterilization should be defined as health care. (cnbc.com)
  • acceptable
  • 3)There are those who teach that non-abortifacient contraception is acceptable if it is used with the blessing of one's spiritual father, and if it is not used simply to avoid having children for purely selfish reasons. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • include
  • Politically, 73 percent of Democrats, 51 percent of political independents and 36 percent of Republicans agreed employer healthcare coverage should include contraception at no cost. (upi.com)
  • Vocal opponents to the prevailing view of contraception in Orthodoxy today include [incomplete]: Bp. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • among
  • Among other religious Americans, 61 percent of religiously unaffiliated Americans said employers should be required to cover contraception compared to 50 percent of white mainline Protestants and 38 percent white evangelical Protestants. (upi.com)
  • A majority of Catholics -- 52 percent versus 49 percent of Americans -- said religiously affiliated colleges and hospitals should provide coverage that includes contraception, but among other religious groups, 59 percent agreed. (upi.com)
  • However
  • However, 31 percent of white evangelical Protestants, versus 45 percent of white mainline Protestants, said religiously affiliated colleges and hospitals should provide coverage that included contraception. (upi.com)
  • However there are a range of opinions on the issue of non-abortifacient contraception. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • provide
  • WASHINGTON, Feb. 7 (UPI) -- Fifty-eight percent of U.S. Roman Catholics say employers should be required to provide employees with healthcare including contraception, a survey indicates. (upi.com)
  • world
  • Vending machine offerings at a Pennsylvania university are expanding beyond the world of junk food and into the world of contraception. (cnn.com)