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  • colorectal
  • It's also critical to know the stages of colorectal cancer. (rochester.edu)
  • The stage of disease impacts colorectal cancer survival rates. (rochester.edu)
  • TEM requires special training, equipment and experience, and Wilmot has surgeons who are well-versed in this and other minimally invasive colorectal cancer procedures. (rochester.edu)
  • If colorectal cancer has spread to the liver, chemoembolization of the hepatic artery may be used. (rochester.edu)
  • cosmic radiation
  • Even if the naturally-occurring background radiation (principally due to radon and cosmic radiation) is safe for humans (and we have no way to know this, since there can be no counterfactual), there is absolutely no scientific basis for lumping any amount of plutonium contamination into the natural background, and concluding that miniscule amounts of plutonium in the environment therefore are also safe. (tinyrevolution.com)
  • surgical
  • [ 2 ] Although more invasive, certainly less colorful, and possibly more palatable, a single-stage surgical approach is more commonly used today. (medscape.com)
  • Controversy exists among cancer specialists (oncologists) and among head & neck surgeons regarding which of several surgical procedures yields better outcomes. (rarediseases.org)
  • safety precautions
  • Special safety precautions are taken to make sure other people aren't exposed to radiation. (cancer.ca)
  • People who receive LDR therapy usually have to stay in the hospital and follow special radiation safety precautions to protect others. (cancer.ca)
  • Talk to your healthcare team about safety precautions you will need to take while in the hospital or at home to protect others from exposure to radiation. (cancer.ca)
  • lungs
  • Several organs close to the esophagus can be damaged by radiation, including the liver, kidneys, lungs, spinal cord and heart. (cancer.ca)
  • background radiation
  • I think about this whenever I hear the claim that, since "background radiation" is safe, the small dose increment which human activities have added to the background (around several percent in most locations) also must be safe. (tinyrevolution.com)
  • That 32 aCi/m^3 of Plutonium measured in New York City is a small contribution to the activity of the background radiation, but understand this: there was never one atom of Plutonium on Planet Earth until humans made some. (tinyrevolution.com)
  • neutron
  • But in less than a millisecond, deadly gamma and neutron radiation had burst from the assembly. (nytimes.com)
  • Kline, who had been three or four feet away from Slotin, received what he calculated to be between 90 and 110 rads of neutron radiation. (nytimes.com)
  • For the first time, doctors and scientists would have a chance to view the effect of measurable levels of neutron radiation on humans without the complicating factor of other damages from a bomb. (nytimes.com)
  • beta particles
  • Approved therapies that use beta particles are not well-suited for treating cancer at the single-cell level because it takes thousands of beta particles to kill a lone cell. (nanotech-now.com)
  • organs
  • When rectal cancer is growing into nearby organs such as the bladder, prostate or uterus, this extensive operation may be recommended. (rochester.edu)
  • Sometimes it is used if the cancer has spread to the nearby liver or other abdominal organs. (rochester.edu)