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  • illnesses
  • Your eating disorder may have led to physical problems and some physical illnesses can mimic anorexia - so get a physical health check. (rcpsych.ac.uk)
  • It's common for people with mental illnesses to be labeled as "crazy," "weird," and many other derogatory terms that further hinder them from getting better. (collegexpress.com)
  • They have always been common, but, with the eradication or successful treatment of many of the serious physical illnesses that formerly afflicted humans, mental illness has become a more noticeable cause of suffering and accounts for a higher proportion of those disabled by disease. (britannica.com)
  • manifestation
  • Sigmund Freud, a psychiatrist from Vienna, believed that anorexia was a physical manifestation of an emotional conflict. (bartleby.com)
  • It has been reported in cases where there is sub-clinical manifestation of anorexia nervosa and also in cases where the full diagnostic criteria AN have been met. (wikipedia.org)
  • brain
  • The research by Dr. Christina Wierenga, Dr. Walter Kaye, and colleagues sheds new light on the brain mechanisms that may contribute to the disturbed eating patterns of anorexia. (medindia.net)
  • Thus, this study found that women who have recovered from anorexia nervosa show two related patterns of changes in brain circuit function that may contribute to their capacity to sustain their avoidance of food. (medindia.net)
  • One study showed different patterns of brain activity between women with bulimia nervosa and healthy women. (csbsju.edu)
  • typically
  • While outcomes with bulimia are typically better than in those with anorexia, the risk of death among those affected is higher than that of the general population. (wikipedia.org)
  • emotional
  • It will address what different emotional disturbances have in common, how they are defined in federal law, and where to find more detailed information on specific disorders. (naset.org)
  • genetic
  • Single-nucleotide changes are the most common cause of natural genetic variation among members of the same species, but there is remarkably little information on how these common genetic mutations affect the infectious and damaging nature of some bacteria," said Musser. (thaindian.com)