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  • Capillary
  • Capillary columns packed electrokinetically with 1.5-μm nonporous octadecylsilica particles are used to achieve rapid separations with high efficiencies. (semanticscholar.org)
  • On-Column Ion-Exchange Preconcentration of Inorganic Anions in Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography with Elution Using Transient-Isotachophoretic Gradients. (edu.au)
  • Breadmore, MC and Palmer, AS and Curran, MAJ and Macka, M and Avdalovic, N and Haddad, PR, On-Column Ion-Exchange Preconcentration of Inorganic Anions in Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatography with Elution Using Transient-Isotachophoretic Gradients. (edu.au)
  • We have developed polar and nonpolar capillary gas chromatography columns to provide the high resolution necessary for detailed hydrocarbon analyses. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Trajan's Column
  • Designed to resemble the Roman Trajan's Column, the Astoria Column was built of concrete and has a 12-foot (3.7 m) deep foundation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike the classical example of Trajan's Column of ancient Rome, which has a turned shaft decorated with a single continuous helical band of low-reliefs depicting Trajan's military might in battle, the twisted column is known to be an eastern motif taken into Byzantine architecture and decoration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Corinthian
  • The column includes a four-stepped base, a relatively low podium, topped by a projecting cornice, a storey, its flat Corinthian pilasters with decorated shafts, supporting an architrave, a sculptured frieze and a heavy cornice. (wikipedia.org)
  • commemorates
  • A plaque near the column commemorates the pioneering Community Antenna Television (CATV) system built by local resident Leroy E. "Ed" Parsons, initially at the Hotel Astoria, in which twin-lead transmission wires redistributed the signal of KRSC-TV (now KING-TV) in Seattle, Washington to area homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chesme Column (Russian: Чесменская колонна) in Tsarskoye Selo commemorates three Russian naval victories in the Russo-Turkish War, 1768-1774, specifically the Battle of Chesma. (wikipedia.org)
  • reboiler
  • The liquid is collected to the bottom of the column and it undergoes evaporation through a reboiler, while the gas is collected to the top and it undergoes condensation through a condenser. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount of heat entering the column from the reboiler and with the feed must equal the amount heat removed by the overhead condenser and with the products. (wikipedia.org)
  • brigade
  • citation needed] The mobile columns employed against Boer forces, by British Empire forces in the South African War of 1899-1902, were usually of the strength of two battalions of infantry, a battery of artillery, and a squadron of cavalry, almost exactly half that of a mixed brigade. (wikipedia.org)
  • An Ammunition Column consists of dedicated military vehicles carrying artillery and small arms ammunition for the combatant unit to which the column belongs, most noted as being the Artillery Brigade or a Divisional Artillery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally speaking, the Brigade Ammunition Column of the Artillery Brigades furnishes ammunition for its own batteries and for one of the brigades of infantry, and each is supported by a Divisional Artillery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ammunition Columns, Brigade or Divisional, were officered and manned by the Royal Artillery and national equivalents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working mostly at night, moving forward, the Brigade Ammunition Columns ammunition wagons were interchangeable with a Firing Batteries own ammunition wagons (one per gun), so full wagons could be easily 'dropped-off', being unhooked and taken away for reloading. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Horse Artillery and Heavy Brigades of Artillery each had their own 'Brigade Ammunition Column (BAC)', organized in much the same way and performing similar duties. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Brigade Ammunition Column of the Heavy Brigade was divisible into three sections, so that the three batteries, if operating independently, have each a section at hand to replenish the ammunition expended. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Horse Artillery Brigade Ammunition Columns carried, besides S.A.A. for corps troops, other than artillery, the reserve of pom-pom ammunition. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Field Brigade Ammunition Column numbered 158 heads, commanded by a Captain, with three Lieutenants or Second-Lieutenants. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Howitzer 'Brigade Ammunition Column (BAC)' included ammunition wagons (with limber), one wagon per howitzer, and one GS wagon for stores, with at least 132 horses (riding and draft, using six per wagon). (wikipedia.org)
  • to replenish each of Brigade Ammunition Columns. (wikipedia.org)
  • An Infantry Division, Divisional Artillery, Divisional Ammunition Column was organized around three 'Field Artillery' Sections, and a fourth 'Howitzer' Section, they bringing forward scaled levels of field artillery, howitzer, and small arms ammunition, for each of the Brigade Columns. (wikipedia.org)
  • rises
  • As the column rises into less dense surrounding air, it will eventually reach an altitude where the hot, rising air is of the same density as the surrounding cooler air. (wikipedia.org)
  • pedestal
  • The term column applies especially to a large round support (the shaft of the column) with a capital and a base or pedestal and made of stone, or appearing to be so. (wikipedia.org)
  • The column stands on a grey marble pedestal lined with bronze bas-reliefs illustrating the Russian victories: these were destroyed by the Germans during World War II and subsequently restored from old photographs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chesme Column may be seen in the distance Side view shows an entrance leading to the base pedestal. (wikipedia.org)
  • bronze
  • Sculpted vines were sometimes carved into the spiralling cavetto of the twisting columns, or made of metal, such as gilt bronze. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turkish: Yılanlı Sütun "Serpentine Column"), also known as the Serpentine Column, Plataean Tripod or Delphi Tripod, is an ancient bronze column at the Hippodrome of Constantinople (known as Atmeydanı "Horse Square" in the Ottoman period) in what is now Istanbul, Turkey. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionic
  • Peter Paul Rubens employed Solomonic columns in tapestry designs, ca 1626 , where he provided a variant of an Ionic capital for the columns as Raphael had done, and rusticated and Solomonic columns appear in the architecture of his paintings with such consistency and in such variety that Anthony Blunt thought is would be pointless to give a complete list. (wikipedia.org)
  • unlike
  • Boer kommando in 17th-20th-century South Africa may be regarded as a form of flying column (unlike commandos in the more recent sense). (wikipedia.org)
  • discrete
  • Eruption columns may be transient, if formed by a discrete explosion, or sustained, if produced by a continuous eruption or closely spaced discrete explosions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The columnar hypothesis states that the cortex is composed of discrete, modular columns of neurons, characterized by a consistent connectivity profile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Functional columns were first defined in the cortex by Mountcastle (1957), who proposed the columnar hypothesis, which states that the cortex is composed of discrete, modular columns of neurons, characterized by a consistent connectivity profile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Constantinople
  • The removal of the column by the Emperor Constantine to his new capital, Constantinople, is described by Edward Gibbon, citing the testimony of the Byzantine historians Zosimus, Eusebius, Socrates, and Sozomenus. (wikipedia.org)
  • structural
  • Columns, or at least large structural exterior ones, became much less significant in the architecture of the Middle Ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Engaged columns serve a similar function as wall buttresses but are distinct from pilasters, which by definition are ornamental and not structural. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in these cases, the stratigraphic column must either be a structural column, in which the units are stacked with respect to how they are observed in the field to have been moved by the faults, or a time column, in which the units are stacked in the order in which they were formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperature
  • Extrinsic factors can be important, with winds sometimes limiting the height of the column, and the local thermal temperature gradient also playing a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • The atmospheric temperature in the troposphere normally decreases by about 6-7 K /km, but small changes in this gradient can have a large effect on the final column height. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some of the common parameters analyzed in the water column are pH, turbidity, temperature, salinity, total dissolved solids, various pesticides, pathogens and a wide variety of chemicals and biota. (wikipedia.org)
  • upward
  • Columns are constructed from the stratigraphic base upward and should be plotted first in pencil in order to insure spaces for gaps at faults and unconformities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The liquid phase flows downward through the column via gravity, while the gas phase flows upward. (wikipedia.org)
  • commander
  • One such commander, the great proconsul Germanicus Caesar used flying columns to great effect in the early stages of the campaign against one of Rome's greatest enemies, Arminius. (wikipedia.org)
  • The objective of California Column commander, Colonel James Henry Carleton (promoted to brigadier general while the column was en route) was to drive Confederate troops out of the Federal New Mexico Territory. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The vertebral column , also known as the backbone or spine , is part of the axial skeleton . (wikipedia.org)
  • The vapor condenses on glass spurs (known as trays or plates) inside the column, and returns to the distilling flask, refluxing the rising distillate vapor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ponsonby's Column, also known as Ponsonby's Cenotaph, was a monumental column in Valletta, Malta. (wikipedia.org)
  • similar
  • Consequently, given similar conditions, to double the column height requires an eruption ejecting 16 times as much material per second. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other compression members are often termed "columns" because of the similar stress conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • In this case, the eruption column is too dense to be lifted high into the air by air convection, and instead falls down the flanks of the volcano to form a pyroclastic flow or surge . (wikipedia.org)
  • Eruption columns form in explosive volcanic activity, when the high concentration of volatile materials in the rising magma causes it to be disrupted into fine volcanic ash and coarser tephra . (wikipedia.org)
  • many columns are "engaged", that is to say form part of a wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Greeks developed the classical orders of architecture, which are most easily distinguished by the form of the column and its various elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • walls
  • Columns are frequently used to support beams or arches on which the upper parts of walls or ceilings rest. (wikipedia.org)
  • marble
  • Catherine II strolling in the park at Tsarskoye Selo with the Chesme Column in the background Marble Bridge in Tsarskoe Selo (1774). (wikipedia.org)
  • base
  • At the base of the column, material is forced upwards out of the vent by the pressure of expanding gas, mainly steam. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plinth was reassembled at Hastings Gardens on St. Michael's Bastion, and the following inscription was added: THE COLUMN 70 FEET HIGH ERECTED ON THIS BASE TO THE MEMORY OF SIR FREDERICK PONSONBY WAS DESTROYED BY LIGHTNING IN JANUARY 1864 The plinth was damaged by shrapnel during aerial bombardment in World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • height
  • The convective thrust region covers most of the height of the column. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several factors control the height that an eruption column can reach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theoretically, the maximum achievable column height is thought to be about 55 km (34 mi). (wikipedia.org)
  • The column height of eruptions which have not been observed can be estimated by mapping the maximum distance that pyroclasts of different sizes are carried from the vent-the higher the column the further ejected material of a particular mass (and therefore size) can be carried. (wikipedia.org)
  • The design of most classical columns incorporates entasis (the inclusion of a slight outward curve in the sides) plus a reduction in diameter along the height of the column, so that the top is as little as 83% of the bottom diameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hydrostatic pressure can be analyzed by the height of a water column, which effectively yields the pressure at a given depth of the column. (wikipedia.org)
  • ancient
  • Some of the most elaborate columns in the ancient world were those of the Persians, especially the massive stone columns erected in Persepolis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of the ancient Persian columns are standing, some being more than 30 metres tall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the writers who allude to the Column in the ancient literature are Herodotus, Thucydides, pseudo-Demosthenes, Diodorus Siculus, Pausanias the traveller, Cornelius Nepos and Plutarch. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • A flying column is a small, independent, military land unit capable of rapid mobility and usually composed of all arms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brief descriptions of the units may be lettered to the right of the column, as in the figure, or the column may be accompanied by an explanation consisting of a small box for each lithologic symbol and for the other symbols alongside the column. (wikipedia.org)
  • During their advance the California Column engaged the Confederates in two small skirmishes. (wikipedia.org)
  • built
  • The Hall of Hundred Columns at Persepolis, measuring 70 × 70 metres, was built by the Achaemenid king Darius I (524-486 BC). (wikipedia.org)
  • Designed by John Foulston as part of the development of the town of Devonport, Plymouth, England, Devonport Column was built in 1824. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Foulston's Town Hall, Column and Library in Devonport in 2008 John Foulston's Town Hall, Column and Library in Devonport Devonport Column and tower block Devonport Column, built 1824 Grade I listed buildings in Plymouth Historic England. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to tradition, these columns came from the "Temple of Solomon", even though Solomon's temple was the First Temple, built in the 10th century BCE and destroyed in 586 BCE, not the Second Temple, destroyed in 70 CE. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1838, a column was built in honour of the dead Governor on St. Andrew's Bastion, overlooking Marsamxett Harbour. (wikipedia.org)
  • unit
  • Ocular dominance column Cortical minicolumn Radial unit hypothesis Buxhoeveden, D. P. (2002-05-01). (wikipedia.org)
  • A plate column (or tray column) is a chemical equipment used to carry out unit operations where it is necessary to transfer mass between a liquid phase and a gas phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • tall
  • The 125-foot (38 m)-tall column has a 164-step spiral staircase ascending to an observation deck at the top and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on May 2, 1974. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 125-foot (38 m)-tall column stands atop 600-foot (180 m)-tall Coxcomb Hill and includes an interior spiral staircase that leads to an observation deck at the top. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentration
  • For example, when studying the metabolism of benthic organisms, it is the specific bottom layer concentration of available chemicals in the water column that is meaningful, rather than the average value of those chemicals throughout the water column. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • All significant Iron Age civilizations of the Near East and Mediterranean made some use of columns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Being made of wood these early columns have not survived, but their stone bases have and through these we may see their use and arrangement in these palace buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • classical
  • In many classical sites, sectioned columns were carved with a centre hole or depression so that they could be pegged together, using stone or metal pins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The columns can include igneous and metamorphic rocks, however, sedimentary rocks are important geologically because of Classical Laws of Geology and how they relate to the accumulation of sediments and the formation of sedimentary environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Structure
  • Some of these columns remained on the altar until the old structure of St. Peter's was torn down in the 16th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • While removed from the altar, eight of these columns remain part of the structure of St. Peter's. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Eruption columns over 10-15 km (6.2-9.3 mi) high break through the tropopause and inject ash and aerosols into the stratosphere . (wikipedia.org)
  • The serpent heads of the 8-metre (26 ft) high column remained intact until the end of the 17th century (one is on display at the nearby Istanbul Archaeology Museums). (wikipedia.org)
  • shows
  • A typical stratigraphic column shows a sequence of sedimentary rocks, with the oldest rocks on the bottom and the youngest on top. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Donation of Constantine, a painting from Raphael's workshop, shows these columns in their original location. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • In areas that are more geologically complex, such as those that contain intrusive rocks, faults, and/or metamorphism, stratigraphic columns can still indicate the relative locations of these units with respect to one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another column can now be observed up close in the St. Peter's Treasury Museum. (wikipedia.org)
  • sometimes
  • In architecture, an engaged column is a column embedded in a wall and partly projecting from the surface of the wall, sometimes defined as semi or three-quarter detached. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cortical column, also called hypercolumn, macrocolumn, functional column or sometimes cortical module, is a group of neurons in the cortex of the brain that can be successively penetrated by a probe inserted perpendicularly to the cortical surface, and which have nearly identical receptive fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The soldiers of the California Column, both infantry and cavalry, often traveled by foot wearing woolen uniforms in the desert heat. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • The Minoans employed columns to create large open-plan spaces, light-wells and as a focal point for religious rituals. (wikipedia.org)
  • elements
  • In Romanesque architecture some columns also featured spiraling elements twisted round each other like hawser. (wikipedia.org)
  • When elements of the California Column reached the Rio Grande, the Confederates had already retreated to Texas. (wikipedia.org)
  • side
  • The importance of columns and their reference to palaces and therefore authority is evidenced in their use in heraldic motifs such as the famous lion-gate of Mycenae where two lions stand each side of a column. (wikipedia.org)
  • The columns are also referred to as the "whispering columns of Jerash", purportedly for their ability to transmit a whisper from one side of the temple to the other. (wikipedia.org)
  • sections
  • Other stone columns are created out of multiple sections of stone, mortared or dry-fit together. (wikipedia.org)
  • The columns have distinct sections that alternate from ridged to smooth with sculpted grape leaves. (wikipedia.org)
  • These columns have sections of twist-fluting alternating with wide bands of foliated reliefs. (wikipedia.org)
  • material
  • This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Column Rock" (content from the Geographic Names Information System). (wikipedia.org)
  • front
  • There are ligaments extending the length of the column at the front and the back, and in between the vertebrae joining the spinous processes , the transverse processes and the vertebral laminae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some miles to the rear were the Divisional Ammunition Columns, which on the one hand replenish the empty wagons of the Columns in front, and on the other draw fresh supplies from the depots on the line of communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • tower
  • The Astoria Column is a tower in the northwest United States, overlooking the mouth of the Columbia River on Coxcomb Hill in Astoria, Oregon. (wikipedia.org)
  • force
  • The California Column was a force of Union volunteers sent to Arizona and New Mexico during the American Civil War. (wikipedia.org)