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  • ethanol
  • Propylene glycol is similar to ethanol when used as a bacteriostatic agent, and its efficacy to inhibit mold is similar to glycerin and is slightly lower than that of ethanol. (chemicalbook.com)
  • Propylene glycol is also used in cosmetics and in the food industry as a carrier for emulsifiers and as a vehicle for flavors in preference to ethanol, since its lack of volatility provides a more uniform flavor. (chemicalbook.com)
  • Mono
  • It is prepared commercially by oxidation of ethylene at high temperature in the presence of silver oxide catalyst, followed by hydration of ethylene oxide to yield mono-, with di-, tri-, and tetraethylene glycols as co-products. (chemicalland21.com)
  • This ring is then hydrolyzed with a base catalyst in a second step to produce mono-ethylene glycol in 98% selectivity. (wikipedia.org)
  • solubility
  • Propylene glycol has good solubility and less toxicity and irritation, and is widely used as solvents, extraction solvents and preservatives for injections (eg. (chemicalbook.com)
  • Glycol: any of a class of organic chemicals characterized by having separate two hydroxyl (-OH) groups, contribute to high water solubility, hygroscopicity and reactivity with many organic compounds, on usually linear and aliphatic carbon chain. (chemicalland21.com)
  • irritation
  • There have been some reports of contact dermatitis associated with propylene glycol.Some local irritation is produced upon application to mucous membranes or when it is used under occlusive conditions.Parenteral administration may cause pain or irritation when propylene glycol is used in high concentration. (chemicalbook.com)
  • amounts
  • Eating or drinking very large amounts of ethylene glycol can cause death, coma, or unconsciousness. (nih.gov)
  • Eating or drinking large amounts of ethylene glycol may cause adult respiratory distress syndrome, affect or damage the kidneys and brain, and cause convulsions and heart problems. (nih.gov)