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  • Wilmut
  • Scottish embryologist Ian Wilmut and his colleagues had taken a mammary gland cell from a six-year-old Scottish Finn Dorset ewe and, via a process known as "nuclear transfer," succeeded in placing the genetic material from that cell into a hollowed-out egg cell from a Scottish Blackface sheep. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov
  • The approach is unlikely be able to create human clones, says lead author Dr Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the Oregon National Primate Research Centre . (abc.net.au)
  • We still believe that the stem cells that we create don't actually have the potential to become embryos and [be] used for reproductive cloning," Oregon team member Dr Shoukhrat Mitalipov told ABC News Breakfast. (abc.net.au)
  • Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the University of Oregon was the first to succeed in making a human stem cell line for research into therapy development. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Reproductive biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University, who developed the technique the CHA team adapted, was more positive. (stabroeknews.com)
  • Reproductive biologist Shoukhrat Mitalipov of Oregon Health and Science University , who developed the technique last year said: "The advance here is showing that (nuclear transfer) looks like it will work with people of all ages. (stem-cells-news.com)
  • living human embryos
  • Technical problems aside, the need to extract these cells from living human embryos raises ethical questions of the highest order. (vatican.va)
  • The use of living human embryos (through 8 weeks post-inception) and fetuses in destructive research is hardly new. (lifeissues.net)
  • This moral condemnation "also regards procedures that exploit living human embryos and fetuses - sometimes specifically 'produced' for this purpose by in vitro fertilization" either to be used as biological material or to provide organs or tissue for transplants in the treatment of diseases. (lifeissues.net)
  • organs
  • Could we clone our organs to be used in a transplant? (howstuffworks.com)
  • Xenotransplantation , or transplanting animal organs into humans, has also been examined as a potential source for organ transplants. (howstuffworks.com)
  • But if our bodies sometimes reject transplanted organs from other humans, how would they react to animal organs? (howstuffworks.com)
  • Future stem cell development for growing replacement organs may not even require cloning. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The tragic state of human trafficking in the world should be an indication that, if cloning ever becomes economically viable, then there is a large demand in the black market for organs and slaves. (roninpen.com)
  • Besides that many of the offspring produced through cloning suffer abnormalities such as missing or deformed organs. (theroar.in)
  • Dignity
  • Human life must be treated with dignity, not as mere raw material for experimentation, Fischbach said. (lifenews.com)
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • 13) From an anthropological standpoint, most people recognize that cloning is offensive to human dignity. (vatican.va)
  • Human lives, souls, and dignity are at stake! (apologeticspress.org)
  • Issues of human genetics and bioethics in Europe have been widely accepted as human rights issues concerning human dignity and fundamental freedoms of the citizens," according to Emilia Ianeva, director of the Center for Human Rights at California State University, Hayward. (publicintegrity.org)
  • In a democratic, pluralistic system, the first guarantee of each individual's freedom is established by unconditionally respecting human dignity at every phase of life, regardless of the intellectual or physical abilities one possesses or lacks. (lifeissues.net)
  • assisted reproductive techniques
  • Although assisted reproductive techniques are commonly applied in humans and animals, they are frequently associated with major developmental deficits and reduced viability. (jove.com)
  • Results: A speedy advancement in the development of different assisted reproductive techniques makes infertility problem more treatable than it ever had been. (jri.ir)
  • create
  • The very suggestion of such human experimentation strikes fear in the hearts of all who remember the atrocities of the Nazi regime's "scientific experimentation" on human subjects and desire to create the Aryan super race. (inciid.org)
  • Cloned cells could be used to create replacement tissue for diseased hearts, pancreatic cells for diabetics, treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, nerve cells for victims of spinal cord injuries, and skin cells for burn victims. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Why clone when you could create it yourself? (writework.com)
  • By manipulating the genetic structure of human embryos, they could weed out undesired traits, create the blonde haired-blue eyed ideal race that Hitler once dreamed of, or even use the technology to rewind one's biological clock indefinitely. (lifeissues.net)
  • Because cloning is still an inexact technology, Schöler questions both the value and the morality of using it to create humans: "You can do reproductive cloning only if you are willing to do cloning by statistics: cloning 100 organisms to get one that is OK-or might be OK-and you forget the other 99. (discovermagazine.com)
  • They say that cloning could create serious and unforeseen consequences. (majortests.com)
  • Why create a human clone to get embryonic stem cells when you can more easily obtain such cells from thousands of available frozen embryos? (lifeissues.org)
  • Genetic engineering might also be used to create a clone designed to be "like me but better" in some predetermined way. (hubpages.com)
  • NABC recommended a federal law to ban any attempt to create a human by cloning, with stiff penalties to enforce it. (hubpages.com)
  • Transgenic clones can create medical products for humans. (abpischools.org.uk)
  • ethical issues
  • This was a huge scientific and technological breakthrough but it also derived many medical and ethical issues and concerns associated with the possibilities of actually creating a replica of a human being. (majortests.com)
  • The dangers, inefficiencies, and ethical issues surrounding cloning are many and lack technical expertise. (theroar.in)
  • biological
  • But the success of an in vitro procedure is far from guaranteed, especially when the mother is in her mid-thirties or older, so cloning one of the parents may be their final hope for having a child with a biological tie. (discovermagazine.com)
  • In this brilliant study of cloned wild life, Carrie Friese adds a whole new dimension to the study of reproduction, illustrating vividly and persuasively how social and biological reproduction are inextricably bound together, and why this matters. (worldcat.org)
  • eggs
  • However, it was not until 1959 that Min Chueh Chang, a young Chinese reproductive investigator, obtained indubitable evidence of in vitro fertilization by achieving live births for the first time from a white rabbit by using eggs and sperm from black ones. (jri.ir)
  • Only one successful clone, however, was produced for every 17 eggs that were cloned. (lifeissues.org)
  • genetics
  • For some time now, we have all been listening to a din of voices on cloning, each offering a different opinion on the genetics and medical aspects, ethics and religious implications. (waterstones.com)
  • Interestingly, none of these players hold Ph.D.'s in human embryology or human molecular genetics -- thus rendering them probably ignorant of even the basics. (lifeissues.net)
  • The Center for Genetics and Society in Oakland, California, says the government should put regulations in place to protect human subjects before any of these methods are allowed. (wired.com)
  • While people are in constant pursuit of ways to improve and advance the quality of human life, some activities in the field of genetics face analysis from many support groups because they are seen as violating fundamental and ethical principles. (majortests.com)