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  • world's
  • In May 2008, the world's first cloned dog became a father in a breeding programme led by Lee Byung-chun. (brighthub.com)
  • She's a mixed breed," explains Jae Woong Wang, a canine-reproduction researcher who works for Hwang here at the Sooam Biotech Research Foundation, the world's first company dedicated to cloning dogs. (vanityfair.com)
  • mice
  • In their studies, the researchers compared the efficiency for cloning mice using a fully differentiated blood cell called a granulocyte with its ancestor cells at different stages: hematopoietic stem cells, which are found in bone marrow and give rise to all red and white blood cells, and progenitor cells. (medgadget.com)
  • iPS in mice was described in 2006, and in humans in 2007, so it's been already 10 or 11 years. (nautil.us)
  • successfully
  • Standing in front of the crowd, with television screens on either side imitating his every move, Robl took his audience through the history of cloning, from the first days in the 1980s, when researchers successfully began transplanting cell nuclei into eggs, to the suddenly real possibility of human cloning. (uml.edu)
  • cells
  • Inside host cells such as viruses or bacteria, these cloning vectors can reproduce the desired genetic sequence and the proteins associated with it. (customtermpapers.org)
  • All attempts to clone mouse cells from adults have failed. (probe.org)
  • Human and mouse cells employ the nuclear DNA after the second cell division. (probe.org)
  • Human and mouse cells may not be capable of being cloned because of this difference. (probe.org)
  • This second paper to produce so-called nuclear transfer hESC (NT-hESC) made the important advance to show that it could be done using adult and even old human somatic cells. (ipscell.com)
  • If NT-hESC are only about the same as these other human pluripotent stem cells in terms of most key attributes then given the difficulty of making NT-hESC (even factoring in some anticipated improvements in technology) there would be little reason to make NT-hESC from a clinical perspective. (ipscell.com)
  • The head start of other human pluripotent stem cells. (ipscell.com)
  • Human iPS cells were first reported in 2007 and thus have a 7-year head start on NT-hESC. (ipscell.com)
  • The first clinical trial using cells derived from human iPS cells began enrolling patients in Japan in August 2013. (ipscell.com)
  • Some have said this is no big deal since the efficiency of making iPS cells is also inefficient. (ipscell.com)
  • When making iPS cells we start with proliferative somatic cells and can essentially use as many as we want (e.g. tens of millions), while in contrast when making NT-hESC each line must be derived using a separate human egg. (ipscell.com)
  • Above is a picture from my book, Stem Cells: An Insider's Guide explaining the differences between reproductive and therapeutic human cloning. (ipscell.com)
  • Diagram of the ways to reprogram cells along with the development of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic cloning would involve cloning cells from a human for use in medicine and transplants, and is an active area of research, but is not in medical practice anywhere in the world, as of May 2019 [update] . (wikipedia.org)
  • Reproductive cloning would involve making an entire cloned human, instead of just specific cells or tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therapeutic cloning is clones with the intention to produce cells of the body that can contribute to the healing of certain diseases. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • Great news from investigators at the University of Connecticut and the University of Pittsburgh, who were able to produce clones from granulocytes (a type of blood cell that does not itself divide) and to show that differentiated cells are more efficient than stem cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. (medgadget.com)
  • Many have attributed cloning's limited success to a theory that clones must be derived from adult stem cells, which reside in a specific area of each tissue and remain quiescent until they are activated by the presence of disease or tissue injury. (medgadget.com)
  • Because these cells can grow into any body cell, therapeutic cloning might lead to genetically matched spare parts that do not trigger an immune response. (whyfiles.org)
  • It did away with a major step of meiosis - the part of the reproductive process where chromosomes reshuffle before splitting into two cells. (kclu.org)
  • Tissue culture - separation and subsequent growth of meristematic cells from tissue in vitro using nutritent mediums (used to clone plants that don't readily produce, that are endangered or rare, and to grow whole plants from genetically engineered plants). (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Microprogation - form of large scale tissue culture, where cells are taken from developing cloned plants or subcultures plants with a fresh culture medium (e.g. used to produce fields full of crops that are pest resistant. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • The puppies, she said, were cloned from cells taken from "Sammie's" mouth and stomach by ViaGen Pets, a pet-cloning company based in Texas that charges $50,000 for the service. (vanityfair.com)
  • There are several different stages of stem cells, each with different reproductive capabilities. (essaypride.com)
  • It mainly generated by mesenchymal-derived adherent cell, such as bone marrow stromal cells, matrix fibroblasts, human embryonic lung fibroblasts and trophoblast cells. (green-blog.org)
  • biology
  • In his hourlong seminar yesterday, Robl opened wide the minds of biology students who were present, many of whom are interested in pursuing cloning research. (uml.edu)
  • Cloning requires the precise reprogramming of the nucleus inserted into an enucleated egg," said Schöler, professor of animal biology and director of Penn's Center for Animal Transgenesis and Germ Cell Research. (scienceagogo.com)
  • While they succeeded in obtaining cloned macaques, the numbers are too low to make many conclusions, except that it remains a very inefficient and hazardous procedure," said Robin Lovell-Badge, an embryologist and head of the Division of Stem Cell Biology and Developmental Genetics at the Francis Crick Institute. (columbustelegram.com)
  • DNA cloning is used to produce large quantities of a specific genetic sequence and is common practice in molecular biology labs. (customtermpapers.org)
  • hurdles
  • On the other hand, one might say that the regulatory and scientific hurdles cleared by both hESC-based products and human iPS cell products might pave the way for NT-hESC and speed their translation to the clinic. (ipscell.com)
  • worse
  • Cloning only makes the problem worse. (probe.org)
  • If in vitro fertilization is expensive, cloning will be worse. (probe.org)
  • Most popular discussions about cloning a human assume the worse possible motives in parents, but why on earth make such assumptions Without evidence If someone assumes that every person he meets is a secret racist or anti-Semite, we say he is paranoid, or a misanthrope, or warped. (essaypride.com)
  • eggs
  • Therefore, the efficiency of making NT-hESC must either be boosted at least say 5-10-fold or a substitute for human eggs must be found. (ipscell.com)
  • bacteria
  • Pubmed ID: 12007421 Circadian clocks are autoregulatory, endogenous mechanisms that allow organisms, from bacteria to humans, to advantageously time a wide range of activities within 24-hr environmental cycles. (jove.com)
  • species
  • And so began D. pachys and its cousins - basically, clone armies of sexless worm species. (kclu.org)
  • Viewing this scenario through the eyes of a baboon, the advertisement would seem to indicate that baboons are a somewhat "superior" species when compared to humans. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Organs
  • Besides that many of the offspring produced through cloning suffer abnormalities such as missing or deformed organs. (theroar.in)
  • gene
  • DNA cloning, often referred to as recombinant DNA technology or gene cloning, is the process by which many copies of a specific genetic sequence are produced. (customtermpapers.org)
  • Instead of trusting the somewhat unpredictable and time-consuming methods of normal animal husbandry to reproduce this genetic hybrid, cloning it assures that the engineered gene product will not be lost. (probe.org)
  • A combination of genetic engineering and cloning makes it possible to very precisely to turn off a gene or adding, enabling fast transgenic animals can be made. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • It locates next to the Zfp127 imprinted gene in the mouse 7C region, which has syntenic homology to the human Prader-Willi syndrome region on chromosome 15q11-q13, indicating that this imprinted region extends to the telomeric side in the mouse. (jove.com)
  • produce
  • Though there are many advantages of reproductive cloning like individuals having fertility problems would be then able to produce biologically related children. (theroar.in)
  • To clone is simply to produce an identical copy of something. (customtermpapers.org)
  • Will humans be cloned to produce children for otherwise childless couples? (probe.org)
  • Only the granulocytes were able to produce two live cloned pups, although both died within a few hours of birth. (medgadget.com)
  • announced plans to produce the first human clone before disappearing from the headlines. (whyfiles.org)
  • Ten years AD, cloning discoveries continue to produce surprising scientific results that raise ethical, political and scientific questions. (whyfiles.org)
  • Taking plant cuttings to produce natural clones. (getrevising.co.uk)
  • Lastly, science refers to the effort of furthering human understanding of this world and the laws that govern it so as to produce useful models of reality by which we can conceive of the nature of the world we live in. (essaypride.com)
  • banning the practice
  • Yesterday, a week after President George W. Bush spoke out against all forms of human cloning, urging the Senate to support far-reaching legislation banning the practice, the cloning expert spoke to a packed room at UMass Lowell, discussing the history, mechanics and possibilities of one of the most controversial aspects of modern research. (uml.edu)
  • 1) I understand the dangers of cloning, which in themselves are enough to warrant banning the practice. (probe.org)
  • fertility
  • A video presentation on the "to clone/not to clone" debate showed only one reason under the "to clone" column -- treatment for fertility cases. (uml.edu)
  • animals
  • While mental features in cloned animals may or may not be significant, but they are vital to the development of a healthy human offspring. (theroar.in)
  • Many of the cloned animals did not appear to be healthy. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • To date, the most important practical application of the cloning of animals the multiplication of animals which are hereby at the same time by means of genetic engineering are genetically modified. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • The pervasive presence of the male and female sexes (whether in plants, animals, or humans), and the ubiquitous nature of sexual reproduction based on differences in gender, deftly defy any naturalistic explanation. (apologeticspress.org)
  • reproduce
  • The team claim that their work will be useful for creating cloned sniffer dogs or guide dogs, that lose their ability to reproduce after being sterilised for training. (brighthub.com)