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  • offensive
  • The eminent University of Chicago ethicist Leon Kass has argued that human cloning would be offensive in part because the clone would 'not be fully a surprise to the world. (wired.com)
  • 13) From an anthropological standpoint, most people recognize that cloning is offensive to human dignity. (vatican.va)
  • Scientist
  • In a series of appearances in Washington this week, soft-spoken Scottish scientist Ian Wilmut, of the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, is arguing that cloning technology can and should be controlled. (cnn.com)
  • A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. (kwit.org)
  • A American scientist is conducting tests for cloning of a young girl who died in a road traffic accident. (abovetopsecret.com)
  • There are attempts by scientist currently to clone from a deceased persons D.N.A. Will this in effect bring back the individual that they previously knew (assuming that thought is "tattoo'd" into D.N.A.) or are the scientist giving false hopes to individuals in order to secure human embryo's? (abovetopsecret.com)
  • create
  • NBAC further urged a ban on federal funding of any attempt to create a child by cloning and urged compliance with a voluntary moratorium by private and non-federally funded sectors. (bio.org)
  • This is a case in which one is deliberately setting out to create a human being for the sole purpose of destroying that human being," says Dr. Daniel Sulmasy , a professor of medicine and a bioethicist at the University of Chicago. (kwit.org)
  • blastocysts
  • So, first we have to understand how to get cloned blastocysts of good quality from in vitro matured oocytes. (innovations-report.com)
  • This will be difficult because it is well known that embryonic development is compromised when in vitro matured oocytes are used, and in cloning technology the oocytes undergo intensive micromanipulation, which makes it even harder to develop good quality blastocysts. (innovations-report.com)
  • In a similar experiment, however, we succeeded in prompting human eggson their own, with no sperm to fertilize themto develop parthenogenetically into blastocysts. (scientificamerican.com)
  • unsafe
  • We supported the moratorium because the specific technology involved in cloning a human being was unsafe and because the prospect of cloning humans raises profound moral, religious and bioethical concerns. (bio.org)
  • risks
  • A new report by Human Genetics Alert (1) shows that the HFEA has ignored important epigenetic risks to children in its analysis of the safety issues raised by mitochondrial replacement' techniques (2). (hgalert.org)
  • HGA argues that the main benefit of the Newcastle techniques, that the mother is genetically related to her child can never justify the safety risks to the child and the social consequences of modifying the human germ line. (hgalert.org)
  • The potential risks to unborn human life cannot be justified. (bpnews.net)
  • Cell
  • It conclusively proves that the stem cell line in question was not cloned as claimed, but rather was generated through parthenogenesis. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The result follows on the heels of an announcement last month by another California stem cell company, International Stem Cell Corporation (ISC) in Oceanside, that it had successfully achieved human parthenogenesis for the first time. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The technique dates back to the 1960s, when John Gurdon at Oxford University cloned a frog using just one cell from a tadpole's gut. (publicradioeast.org)
  • And in this week's issue of the journal Cell , Mitalipov's team reports they finally did it in humans. (kwit.org)
  • Human cloning is the creation of a human being, human cell , or human tissue taken from another human. (wikipedia.org)
  • infertile
  • Cloning could be a blessing for the infertile, who otherwise could not experience biological parenthood. (wired.com)
  • However
  • However, that assertion comes with a giant asterisk because the nuances and ethics related to human cloning make the issue significantly more complicated. (healthline.com)
  • However, pro-life groups condemned the move as trivialising human life. (newscientist.com)
  • However, human cloning isn't likely to happen tomorrow. (redorbit.com)
  • The factory, however, will not be cloning people but cattle for the Chinese food market. (hubpages.com)
  • He does point out, however, that things change, that gay marriage is now accepted, and that attitudes towards cloning a child may well be very different in a few years. (hubpages.com)
  • Such assurances will not, however, impress those who are determined to see all human cloning, for whatever purpose, banned - even if their UN victory appears to be purely symbolic. (theregister.co.uk)
  • technology
  • Do we jump on the bandwagon of scientific progress and stay at the cutting edge of technology , or do we allow ourselves to see all the negative implications and results of human cloning? (everything2.com)
  • People throughout the earth are going to always try to clone humans, but it is the responsibility of the United States to keep an eye to monitor the progress of this technology. (everything2.com)
  • organs
  • Aaron Levine, a bioethicist at Georgia Tech, said that the biggest impact of cloning on human health is likely to come from animals raised to produce organs, tissue or biological drugs that will not be rejected by the human immune system. (medindia.net)
  • make
  • Although movies and books sometimes make it seem like human cloning would only lead to an army of clones taking over the world and destroying mankind, there must be a scientific reason that this topic is being researched. (easybib.com)
  • This method is used to make an exact copy of a human. (wikipedia.org)
  • Harvard
  • Harvard University President Lawrence Summers said the potential benefits of the program outweighed the concerns of those who felt it challenged the sanctity of human life. (hindustantimes.com)
  • dignity
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • genes
  • This asexual form of reproduction would bypass the usual 'shuffling' of genes that makes every individual unique in his/her genome and would arbitrarily fix the genotype in one particular configuration, (12) with predictable negative genetic consequences for the human genepool. (vatican.va)