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  • mammary gland
  • Scottish embryologist Ian Wilmut and his colleagues had taken a mammary gland cell from a six-year-old Scottish Finn Dorset ewe and, via a process known as "nuclear transfer," succeeded in placing the genetic material from that cell into a hollowed-out egg cell from a Scottish Blackface sheep. (apologeticspress.org)
  • These cells express the genes appropriate for mammary gland function, not the genes which are important for embryonic development. (hstalks.com)
  • sheep
  • It seems it is much harder to clone a human being than it is to clone a sheep, a frog or a mouse. (bioethics.net)
  • Eighteen years ago, scientists in Scotland took the nuclear DNA from the cell of an adult sheep and put it into another sheep's egg cell that had been emptied of its own nucleus. (wunc.org)
  • It also means that finally getting the sheep technology to work with cells from adult humans may not turn out to be a turning point for this technology, after all. (wunc.org)
  • That zygote-which then contained the full complement of 54 chromosomes (as if it had been fertilized by a sperm cell)-was placed into the uterus of a second Scottish Blackface sheep that served as a surrogate mother. (apologeticspress.org)
  • identical
  • In the past, creating identical cells in this manner has been a major challenge. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • CEO, Xu Xiaochun, educated at Canadian and American universities, plans to produce cloned beef using genetically identical super-cattle to cater to the hugely successful Chinese middle class who enjoy the taste of Kobe beef. (hubpages.com)
  • With cloning, all meat will be identical. (hubpages.com)
  • Phillip had Melvin cloned about two years ago, and he now has two identical dogs - Ken Gordon, named after his uncle, and Henry Fontenot, named after his friend - with the same traits and characteristics as Melvin. (hubpages.com)
  • controversy
  • DARNOVSKY: What we saw the last time cloning was in the headlines was that the discussion really got mired in the abortion controversy. (npr.org)
  • It uses material from the Wikipedia article 'Stem Cell Controversy' . (bootstrike.com)
  • Robert Lanza
  • Jerry was one of the greatest scientists and cloning pioneers of our time," Dr. Robert Lanza, chief science officer at Advanced Cell Technology of Worcester, a biotech company which has pursued creating stem cells through cloning, told The Hartford Courant. (fisheaters.com)
  • Our intent is to use this technology to generate stem cells to treat serious and life-threatening diseases, not to create a child," says Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology (ACT) in an article in "Scientific American" (January 2002). (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Robert Lanza, chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology , says that was an important step, but not ideal for medical purposes. (wunc.org)
  • genetic
  • The resulting stem cells could then possibly be used to repair damaged tissue, or even treat genetic conditions. (www.nhs.uk)
  • They would need some genetic marker that would let them tell the cloned cells apart from the native cells of the cow. (futurepundit.com)
  • CloneRâ„¢ enables the robust generation of clonal cell lines without single-cell adaptation, thus minimizing the risk of acquiring genetic abnormalities. (stemcell.com)
  • They repeated the process - this time starting with the genetic material extracted from the skin cells of a much older man. (wunc.org)
  • hematopoietic
  • Expressed during embryogenesis to help blood cell development, ADAR1 subsequently turns off and is triggered by viral infections where it protects normal hematopoietic stem cells from attack. (labspaces.net)
  • A new study by Gerald de Haan, Leonid Bystrykh, and colleagues suggests that the skeletal distribution of transplanted hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) clones is surprisingly nonuniform. (rupress.org)
  • unethical
  • For instance, in an opinion paper the student might write a thesis such as "cloning is unethical. (essaytown.com)
  • At this point, these groups have their work cut out for them as cloning people may well be determined to be unethical. (hubpages.com)
  • genomic
  • In other words, the egg needs to erase all tissue-specific memories from the skin cell and revert it into a genomic blank slate. (eurekalert.org)
  • So the problem of nuclear cloning is genomic reprogramming. (hstalks.com)
  • eggs
  • Then they cloned them by putting their nucleuses into unfertilized eggs (from the same or different cows? (futurepundit.com)
  • Writing in the journal Cell Stem Cell , they say they started with nuclear DNA extracted from the skin cells of a middle-age man and injected it into human eggs donated by four women. (wunc.org)
  • Yang's team isolated the cells' nuclei and injected them into mouse eggs whose own nuclei had been removed. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • genes
  • For a viable fetus to develop, the egg needs to reprogram the genome of the skin cell, shutting off genes specific for skin tissue and turning on genes needed for embryonic development, genes that are normally dormant in tissue-specific cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • With a series of microarray chips, Brambrink measured which genes were active and which were silent in both kinds of cells. (eurekalert.org)
  • He'd like to see a library of cells created with those carefully chosen genes. (wunc.org)
  • A potential use of genetically-customized stem cells would be to create cell lines that have genes linked to the particular disease. (bootstrike.com)
  • Only few clones manage to activate these genes, and those which do manage to activate these genes are often not normal. (hstalks.com)
  • make
  • The Wright brothers took off and this has actually managed to make embryonic stem cells. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is a lot easier to find indications that one has created a differentiated cell type because differentiated cell types have unique proteins that are well known and used for doing what they do and they make various chemicals that can be tested for. (futurepundit.com)
  • If verified, it would be only the second confirmed time someone's been able to use cloning methods to make human embryonic stem cells, considered the body's master cells. (bioethics.net)
  • The few clones that make it into adulthood are often plagued by bizarre health complications. (eurekalert.org)
  • The British government is set to make a decision on 5Sept07 about whether scientists can engage in human and animal cloning that fuses the two together. (physiciansforlife.org)
  • To examine how a cell's maturity affects its usefulness for cloning, Xiangzhong (Jerry) Yang of the University of Connecticut in Storrs and his colleagues worked with three types of blood cells from a mouse: stem cells that produce all types of blood cells, more-mature cells that can make only a few blood cell types, and fully mature white blood cells called granulocytes that can no longer divide. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • This could lead to diabetic patients being able to produce their own cells that make insulin to replace their non-functioning cells. (empr.com)
  • neurons
  • Renowned stem cell expert, Swedish researcher Olle Lindvall, in an article at NewScientist.com (November 7, 2003), says he expects to be able to transform stem cells into the dopamine-producing neurons Parkinson's patients so badly need. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • Stem cells could potentially be used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease -- but it's a very difficult problem to generate large numbers of dopamine-producing neurons, which are the cells we need," Lindvall says. (thenakedscientists.com)
  • They are making new skin cells, blood cells, neurons, and assorted other cell types. (futurepundit.com)
  • Ethics
  • For an ethics paper, the student might write a thesis statement such as "the potential for mishandling cloning technology is high. (essaytown.com)
  • harvest
  • It specifies how to harvest native chromatin from a variety of cell types, fractionate the chromatin into manageable fragments, and then use an antibody to tag and isolate the proteins that possess specific epigenetic marks. (cshlpress.com)
  • create
  • The technique could potentially be used to take skin cells from a patient to create "personalised" stem cells. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Though the way to create life using the cloning method is different (than the natural way), we do believe a being created technically possess a consciousness ("soul") from the first cells division. (dharmaling.org)
  • So ideally scientists would like to be able to extract DNA from the cells of older people - not just cells from infants - to create therapies for adult diseases. (wunc.org)
  • They injected it into 77 human egg cells, and from all those attempts, managed to create two viable cells that contained DNA from one or the other man. (wunc.org)
  • extract
  • Physicians could also extract DNA from the person who is going to receive the cellular transplant - creating a patient-specific treatment - though that would end up being far more expensive than drawing from a library of ready-made cells. (wunc.org)
  • They want to extract embryonic stem (ES) cells after creating huma. (bio-medicine.org)
  • produce
  • Undifferentiated stem cells could produce tumors and multiply unchecked within a patient, causing more problems than providing appropriate therapy. (godandscience.org)
  • In principle, scientists could produce a series of cell lines that would allow a close match for the majority of would-be cell recipients - just as transplant surgeons currently seek a close match for organ donors. (wunc.org)
  • In this cloning process, known as nuclear transfer, a donated ovum with all DNA removed had the woman's adult cells inserted and reprogrammed to produce insulin cells. (empr.com)
  • replication
  • The giant clone replication factory in Tianjin, a harbour town in the north of China, will be ready to go into production within seven months - June 2016. (hubpages.com)