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  • cows
  • Cloning animals specifically livestock has greatly impacted the environment by producing more milk and dairy from cloned cows. (smore.com)
  • Also because cloned cows also provide more meat. (smore.com)
  • LOWELL -- When cloning pioneer Dr. James Robl first began traveling down the path of embryos and cell nuclei, he just wanted to make a few good cows. (uml.edu)
  • But the agricultural aspect of cloning -- the possibility of providing dairy farmers with more and better cows -- was always the primary goal. (uml.edu)
  • Robl cloned two cows from a bovine named Zita, who produced huge amounts of milk and was ranked as the top cow in the country. (uml.edu)
  • Robl has also done work that transforms cows into producers of human antibodies. (uml.edu)
  • By using cloning techniques, and replacing a cow's antibody genes with a human's, researchers can inject the cow with a vaccine, which forces the cows to produce antibodies to fight off the weakened virus. (uml.edu)
  • On the farm, cloning breeds more productive cows , faster horses, sheep with better wool. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Dr. Jaenisch challenged claims from commercial agricultural cloning firms that cloned cows and other farm animals are normal. (toledoblade.com)
  • nucleus
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When an animal is cloned, the nucleus of a mature adult cell is removed and inserted into an egg whose nucleus has been removed. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Cloning animals involves manipulating the nucleus in a cell taken from an adult animal. (toledoblade.com)
  • somatic
  • In 2004 and 2005, Hwang Woo-suk , a professor at Seoul National University , published two separate articles in the journal Science claiming to have successfully harvested pluripotent, embryonic stem cells from a cloned human blastocyst using somatic-cell nuclear transfer techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • transplants
  • Organ cloning transplants will affect our future and have a great impact because it will make it easier for people who significantly need and organ to receive it quicker and more efficiently without being put on a waiting list for one. (smore.com)
  • placental
  • Genomic imprinting is seen only in placental mammals (like humans) and is a result of the biological battle between the sexes. (readthehook.com)
  • experiments
  • In fact, the current (1990) Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (HFE Act 1990) already allows the mixing of human and animal gametes (an ovum and a sperm) but this is after licensing for specific experiments and only for the purpose of testing the fertility or normality of sperm and requires that the result of the mixed gametes is destroyed no later than the two cell stage. (lynnejones.org.uk)
  • The unintended consequences of human knowledge and curiosity are easily recognized in technologies of atom splitting (bombs and waste), agriculture (land devastation), and unethical medical experiments. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • infertile
  • Once the public understands the limitations of cloning- e.g., one can't bring back the dead- human cloning will likely be used mostly by infertile couples who have no other choice for bearing biologically related children. (readthehook.com)
  • Clonaid
  • At one of the oddest press conferences ever, Brigitte Bosselier, a "bishop" in the Raelian UFO cult announced on December 27 that their cloning company, Clonaid, has succeeded in cloning a 7-pound baby girl named Eve. (readthehook.com)
  • However, Clonaid says that it has agreed to let an independent panel chosen by science journalist Michael Guillen determine whether Eve is in fact a clone of her mother. (readthehook.com)
  • And for $200,000 the company Clonaid promises to clone a human baby. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • An American firm called Clonaid has made repeated claims about a imminent human cloning. (toledoblade.com)
  • mammalian
  • Right now, only two to four percent of mammalian clones are long-term survivors. (readthehook.com)
  • To make a long story short, the problem with mammalian cloning may be that the genes from nuclei from mature cells may have lost their proper imprinting because of aging. (readthehook.com)
  • Robl is a pioneer in the cloning of mammalian embryos and produced the first cloned transgenic cow in 1998. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • In this type of cloning, a fragment of DNA is inserted into an element capable of self-replication such as a bacterial plasmid, which in turn is inserted into a host cell, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, in order to create multiple copies of the original gene. (smore.com)
  • biological
  • human reproductive cloning is not an ethical issue, it's simply a biological issue. (uml.edu)
  • From a biological standpoint, bringing cloned human embryos to birth would be dangerous for the human species. (vatican.va)
  • It states in part that the district "understands that the teaching of some scientific subjects such as biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming and human cloning , can cause controversy and that some teachers may be unsure of the district's expectations concerning how they should present information on such subjects. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • No, we are not respecting the rights of others through cloning as we shall be subjecting the others, especially the original biological humans, to a curtailment of their natural rights as these rights will be subdivided further. (slideserve.com)
  • identical
  • We should treat all clones like we would treat identical twins or triplets. (readthehook.com)
  • Some lower organisms, such as protozoans, plants exclusively produced by cell division in which two identical clones arise, even the verb cloning is not used here. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • The human body occasionally clones a fertilized egg resulting in the birth of "identical twins. (ethicsdaily.com)
  • Facts about identical twins, parent-child resemblance, and what happens when parents seek to replace a dead child are fascinating in their own right, and provide useful analogies for the implications of human cloning. (waterstones.com)
  • dignity
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • 13) From an anthropological standpoint, most people recognize that cloning is offensive to human dignity. (vatican.va)
  • We believe in the inherent equality and human dignity of all people. (geneticsandsociety.org)
  • embryonic stem
  • Many in the international scientific community believe that the promise of stem cell-based studies or therapies will be realized only if we can derive new human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines. (jci.org)
  • theoretically
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • favor
  • We will begin by formulating the best moral case for cloning-to-produce-children describing both the specific purposes it might serve and the philosophic and moral arguments made in its favor. (georgetown.edu)
  • Indeed, some of the arguments in favor of cloning-to-produce-children appeal to the deepest and most meaningful of our society's shared values. (georgetown.edu)
  • abnormalities
  • Imaging of DNA and basic cell structure revealed chromosomal abnormalities inside the cells, despite the apparent normal division of the cloned cells. (abc.net.au)
  • Another aspect is that cloned animals have led to early deaths and abnormalities. (digitaljournal.com)
  • moral
  • But it is hard to see why this age difference might present an ethical problem- or give clones a different moral status. (readthehook.com)
  • One moral objection often heard is that cloned children would be not ends in themselves, but would be means for their parents' self-aggrandizement (not to mention the means of aggrandizement for Raelian beliefs). (readthehook.com)
  • From there we will move to the moral case against cloning-to-produce-children. (georgetown.edu)
  • technology to clone
  • But using cloning technology to clone human cells does not create a new human being. (bio.org)
  • Socially, cloning could be an issue because the availability of technology to clone an individual would not be a great thing for society because it would be costly and it would be unsure as to who should have access to the type of technology that is being used to clone organisms. (smore.com)
  • possibility of human
  • Standing in front of the crowd, with television screens on either side imitating his every move, Robl took his audience through the history of cloning, from the first days in the 1980s, when researchers successfully began transplanting cell nuclei into eggs, to the suddenly real possibility of human cloning. (uml.edu)
  • Yet Robl says the ethical dilemma presented by the possibility of human clones isn't even an issue yet. (uml.edu)
  • sperm
  • Yet, how definitive for humans could be evidence derived from rhesus monkeys, a species differing from humans with respect to oocyte size, form of implantation, and perhaps also response to micromanipulation procedures such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)? (zavos.org)
  • For example, if a man could not produce sperm, cloning would allow him to have a child who is "biologically related" to him. (georgetown.edu)
  • extinct
  • Animals are cloned for many reasons, such as to revive an endangered or extinct species, cloning livestock for food, reproducing a deceased pet, etc. (smore.com)
  • uterus
  • These are not cells or products that could ever develop into a human being, even if implanted in a uterus. (bio.org)
  • clinical
  • The use of normal, cloned human liver cells to test new drugs under development for certain toxic metabolites, for example, would reduce the danger of human clinical trials by eliminating such compounds before human testing. (bio.org)
  • The clinical and scientifically grounded insights of this book should help inform the reader's ethical judgments and attitudes about cloning people. (waterstones.com)
  • Containing a wealth of information drawn from the author's clinical experience and the psychiatric literature, this book is a welcome antidote to the hype and armchair speculation prompted by the prospect of cloning. (waterstones.com)
  • Animals
  • Agriculture - Cloning is used for applications in agriculture.These include producing animals with desirable qualities such as disease resistance, longevity, or improved traits. (bio.org)
  • Animals can also be cloned to produce proteins for human therapeutic use such as human antibodies, allowing for large-scale production of human vaccines. (bio.org)
  • It is perfectly conceivable that someone, at some point, will clone a human being, since the technology to do this in other animals is becoming more commonplace. (sciencemediacentre.org)
  • Prominent researchers have been arguing that cloning animals and humans in particular is risky business. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Only a small percentage of cloned animals survive to birth, and those that do are usually subject to a host of health problems including obesity, frequent bouts of pneumonia, and liver failure. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Many of the cloned animals did not appear to be healthy. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • Meanwhile, starting in the US to get the first products from cloned animals on the market, including meat or meat from cloned animals is called. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • vitro
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • In this message, I would like to discuss the wide-ranging impact that in vitro fertilization, the main method of assisted reproductive medicine, is having on regenerative medicine. (childresearch.net)
  • However, considering the case of the natural clones called twins helps us think clearly about what clones produced in vitro would be like. (readthehook.com)