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  • world's
  • From eGenesis's tiny headquarters in Kendall Square, she intends to use CRISPR to accomplish what the world's largest drug companies failed to despite investing billions of dollars: create "designer pigs" whose organs can be transplanted into people. (scientificamerican.com)
  • BBC News and Scientific American called Dolly "the world's most famous sheep," The cloning method Campbell and Wilmut used to create Dolly constituted a breakthrough in scientific discovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • On November 2015, a Chinese biotech company Boyalife Group announced that it will partner with Hwang's laboratory, Sooam Biotech, to open the world's largest animal cloning factory in Tianjin as early as 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • April 24, 2005-May 2015) was an Afghan hound, credited with being the world's first cloned dog. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • Hwang's next claim came only two months later in April 1999, when he announced the cloning of a Korean cow, Jin-i, also without providing any scientifically verifiable data. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Holstein heifer named Daisy was cloned by Dr. Xiangzhong (Jerry) Yang using ear skin cells from a high-merit cow named Aspen at the University of Connecticut in 1999, followed by three additional clones, Amy, Betty, and Cathy in 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • From November 1999, Campbell held the post of Professor of Animal Development, Division of Animal Physiology, School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham where he continued to study embryo growth and differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genome
  • In order to determine the performance of some of the existing microarrays, Affymetrix Porcine, Affymetrix Human U133+2.0, and the U.S. Pig Genome Coordination Program spotted glass oligonucleotide microarrays were compared for their reproducibility, coverage, platform independent and dependent sensitivity using fibroblast cell lines derived from control and parthenogenic porcine embryos. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Evolutionary biologist Beth Shapiro points out that "cloning" is a specific technique which cannot be accomplished without a living cell, none of which are available for mammoths, but suggests genome editing might be feasible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Development will ensue normally and after many mitotic divisions, this single cell forms a blastocyst (an early stage embryo with about 100 cells) with an identical genome to the original organism (i.e. a clone). (wikipedia.org)
  • surrogate mother
  • That zygote-which then contained the full complement of 54 chromosomes (as if it had been fertilized by a sperm cell)-was placed into the uterus of a second Scottish Blackface sheep that served as a surrogate mother. (apologeticspress.org)
  • The "highlight of the month," biologist Marc Guell tells Yang, is that surrogate mother pigs didn't reinfect fetuses with "PERVs. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The hybrid cell is then stimulated to divide by an electric shock, and when it develops into a blastocyst it is implanted in a surrogate mother. (wikipedia.org)
  • oocytes
  • Development and viability of pig oocytes matured in a protein-free medium containing epidermal growth factor. (publish.csiro.au)
  • 2001
  • When the editors of Time screamed on the cover of their February 19, 2001 issue, "Human Cloning is Closer than You Think! (apologeticspress.org)
  • A purebred Hereford calf clone named Chloe was born in 2001 at Kansas State University's purebred research unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001, Brazil cloned their first heifer, Vitória. (wikipedia.org)
  • maturation
  • This review summarises recent achievements both in the background technologies (maturation, activation, embryo culture) and the actual performance of the nuclear replacement. (publish.csiro.au)
  • canines
  • Snuppy has since been used in the first known successful breeding between cloned canines, after his sperm was used to artificially inseminate two cloned females, which resulted in the birth of 10 puppies in 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theriogenology
  • He was a professor of theriogenology and biotechnology at Seoul National University (dismissed on March 20, 2006) who became infamous for fabricating a series of experiments, which appeared in high-profile journals, in the field of stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Department of theriogenology and biotechnology at Seoul National University for cloning Snuppy was led by Woo Suk Hwang. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem-cell res
  • EDITOR'S NOTE: Two of the most hotly debated and currently controversial topics-in the fields of science, religion, ethics, and politics-are human cloning and stem-cell research. (apologeticspress.org)
  • On May 12, 2006, Hwang was charged with embezzlement and bioethics law violations after it emerged much of his stem cell research had been faked. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Korea Times reported on June 10, 2007, that Seoul National University fired him, and the South Korean government canceled his financial support and barred him from engaging in stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • In February 2011, Hwang visited Libya as part of a $133 million project in the North African country to build a stem cell research center and transfer relevant technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hwang's
  • Until Hwang's claim, it was generally agreed that creating a human stem cell by cloning was next to impossible due to the complexity of primates. (wikipedia.org)
  • The investigation found that, despite his fabrications in previous projects, Hwang's research related to Snuppy was accurate and Snuppy was a clone of the adult Afghan hound. (wikipedia.org)
  • transgenic
  • This process was mainly generated by the rapidly increasing need for transgenic pigs for biomedical research purposes, both for future xenotransplantation to replace damaged human organs or tissues, and for creating authentic animal models for human diseases to study aetiology, pathogenesis and possible therapy. (publish.csiro.au)
  • The authors conclude that although in this early phase of research no direct evidence can be provided about the practical use of transgenic pigs produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer as organ donors or disease models, the future chances even in medium term are good, and at least proportional with the efforts and sums that are invested into this research area worldwide. (publish.csiro.au)
  • Nuclear remodeling and reprogramming in transgenic pig production. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Production of a transgenic pig expressing human albumin and enhanced green fluorescent protein. (semanticscholar.org)
  • parthenogenetic
  • Comparisons between control and parthenogenetic mouse embryos have been previously used to identify imprinted genes [ 7 , 8 ] and extensive information exists regarding expected differences in gene expression between these two cell populations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • donors
  • In 2015, she and colleagues in Church's lab used CRISPR to eliminate from pig cells 62 genes so potentially dangerous their very existence nixed previous efforts to turn pigs into organ donors. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Keith Campbell
  • Dolly was cloned by Keith Campbell, Ian Wilmut and colleagues at the Roslin Institute, part of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, and the biotechnology company PPL Therapeutics, based near Edinburgh. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • There's the challenge of CRISPR'ing an unprecedented number of genes without compromising the viability of the designer pigs and without introducing aberrant edits. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In most cases, isolated genes or cells are duplicated for scientific study, and no new animal results. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • Cloning is commonly used to amplify DNA fragments containing whole genes, but it can also be used to amplify any DNA sequence such as promoters, non-coding sequences and randomly fragmented DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • A potential use of stem cells genetically matched to a patient would be to create cell lines that have genes linked to a patient's particular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In January 2016 the scientist at the Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes in Hisar, India announced that they had cloned a buffalo offspring "Cirb Gaurav" using cells of the ventral side of the tail of superior buffalo. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • For example, in May and June 1997, I authored a series on "Cloning-Scientific and Biblical Ramifications. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Gene, the first cloned calf in the world was born in 1997 at the American Breeders Service facilities in Deforest, Wisconsin, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • organisms
  • In biology, cloning is the process of producing similar populations of genetically identical individuals that occurs in nature when organisms such as bacteria, insects, plants or animals reproduce asexually. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in the case of cell cultures from multi-cellular organisms, cell cloning is an arduous task as these cells will not readily grow in standard media. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene
  • In 1997, Ritchie and Campbell in collaboration with PPL (Pharmaceutical Proteins Limited) created another sheep named "Polly", created from genetically altered skin cells containing a human gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gene, the first cloned calf in the world was born in 1997 at the American Breeders Service facilities in Deforest, Wisconsin, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem cell
  • The disease specific stem cell lines could then be studied in order to better understand the condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Campbell believed all potential stem cell populations should be used for both basic and applied research which may provide basic scientific knowledge and lead to the development of cell therapies. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • This study confirmed that suckling young pig is a laboratory animal susceptible to EHFV strains R22 and HB55 isolated from wild rodents and patients with EHF. (virosin.org)
  • University
  • From November 1999, Campbell held the post of Professor of Animal Development, Division of Animal Physiology, School of Biosciences at the University of Nottingham where he continued to study embryo growth and differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Holstein heifer named Daisy was cloned by Dr. Xiangzhong (Jerry) Yang using ear skin cells from a high-merit cow named Aspen at the University of Connecticut in 1999, followed by three additional clones, Amy, Betty, and Cathy in 1999. (wikipedia.org)
  • Millie and Emma were two female Jersey cows cloned at the University of Tennessee in 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • In 2015 the Chinese company BoyaLife announced that in partnership with the Korean company Sooam Biotech, they were planning to build a factory in Tianjin, China to produce 100,000 cloned cattle per year, starting in 2016 to supply China's growing market for quality beef. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • A purebred Hereford calf clone named Chloe was born in 2001 at Kansas State University's purebred research unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Boran cattle bull was cloned at the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi. (wikipedia.org)
  • In January 2016 the scientist at the Central Institute for Research on Buffaloes in Hisar, India announced that they had cloned a buffalo offspring "Cirb Gaurav" using cells of the ventral side of the tail of superior buffalo. (wikipedia.org)
  • days
  • Injaz, a cloned female dromedary camel, was born in 2009 at the Camel Reproduction Center in Dubai, United Arab Emirates after an "uncomplicated" gestation of 378 days. (wikipedia.org)
  • lines
  • There have not been formally reports of Bombyx mori densonucleosis virus infccting insect cell lines. (virosin.org)
  • body
  • The assembly processes of the Leucoma selicis NPV are observed by electron microscopy of sections of infected larval fat body cells. (virosin.org)