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  • humans
  • The university stated that since dogs and humans share certain diseases, the clones "could be very valuable in finding technologies useful for curing human diseases. (findingdulcinea.com)
  • Now some of the researchers want to clone humans. (apologeticspress.org)
  • However, the determination of whether any particular conduct is good, bad or neutral is not dispositive in addressing the second issue: the familial status of an individual (re)produced through cloning in relationship to other humans generally, and other members of this person's "family" specifically. (jlaw.com)
  • Genomic imprinting is seen only in placental mammals (like humans) and is a result of the biological battle between the sexes. (readthehook.com)
  • The concept of mammalian clones, even humans, was not new at the time of Dolly's birth. (britannica.com)
  • Although there may be some positive affects to cloning humans, there are far too many opposing factors in this situation. (essaypride.com)
  • But even if humans could be cloned, they would not necessarily be identical, according to Grebe who noted that human twins may appear to be exactly alike, but have distinct personalities. (cnn.com)
  • Scroll down this page for introductory article to human cloning - at the bottom you will find more useful human cloning resources including video on how to clone humans and useful human cloning links. (globalchange.com)
  • And in January, an elderly Chicago physicist named Richard Seed triggered a national media furor simply by telling a radio reporter about his half-baked proposal to clone humans. (latimes.com)
  • This is, admittedly, a very good proof of concept for chimera organ cloning, though mice and rats have more genetic similarities than pigs and humans have. (change.org)
  • 1996
  • She was born on 5 July 1996 and died from a progressive lung disease five months before her seventh birthday (the disease was not considered related to her being a clone). (wikipedia.org)
  • experiments
  • Today there are no federal laws specifically regarding human cloning, but the Food and Drug Administration does have the authority to veto any experiments to explicitly create a cloned human baby. (inverse.com)
  • God intended for children to be brought into this world by their parents- not by cloning experiments, which would destroy many human lives! (apologeticspress.org)
  • Such experiments are not banned in the United States, although some American ethicists are calling for federal laws prohibiting the practice and an immediate international moratorium on human cloning. (cnn.com)
  • The news on human cloning experiments exposed the fact that most nations of the world had little or no legislation covering genetic engineering. (globalchange.com)
  • However, what he went on to say was that the proposed ban was only for 5 years, and that nuclear transfer experiments (basic human cloning technique) could continue, though not with government money. (globalchange.com)
  • mice
  • Those doubts were set aside two years later in 1998, when clones of mice were created using the same technique. (inverse.com)
  • Dolly's
  • The funding for Dolly's cloning was provided by PPL Therapeutics and the Ministry of Agriculture . (wikipedia.org)
  • Some in the press speculated that a contributing factor to Dolly's death was that she could have been born with a genetic age of six years, the same age as the sheep from which she was cloned. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clone: The Road to Dolly and the Path Ahead," by New York Times reporter Gina Kolata, lucidly separates science fact from fiction, reconstructs the history of scientific developments that led to Dolly's creation and offers a thoughtful overview of the potential pitfalls attending the discovery. (latimes.com)
  • 2002
  • In January 2002 she was found to have arthritis in her hind legs, a diagnosis that raised questions about genetic abnormalities that may have been caused in the cloning process. (history.com)
  • In 2002, a bizarre sect of spaceship-worshipping Raelians claimed that "Baby Eve," the clone, had already been born. (whyfiles.org)
  • embryonic
  • Moreover, clones had been generated previously in the laboratory, but only from embryonic cells that were either undifferentiated or only partially differentiated . (britannica.com)
  • However, the use of cloned embryonic stem cells entails a high risk of introducing cells from abnormal embryos into patients. (vatican.va)
  • The transfer of such cloned embryonic stem cells into a patient would be therefore extremely hazardous: these cells might provoke genetic disorders, or initiate leukemias or other cancers. (vatican.va)
  • Scottish
  • No single story from the annals of science claimed more public attention last year than the tale of the Scottish scientist who became the first in history to clone an adult mammal. (latimes.com)
  • implications
  • An analysis of the implications of cloning found in Jewish law really contains within it three distinctly different problems in need of resolution. (jlaw.com)
  • President Clinton launched an immediate 90 day report into the implications for human cloning as soon as the news of Dolly became public. (globalchange.com)
  • In a more welcome vein, the first in what promises to be a series of books examining the implications of cloning has been published. (latimes.com)
  • adult cell
  • Dolly was the first cloned mammal created from an adult cell. (inverse.com)
  • Whatever its ultimate scientific or commercial importance, the unsettling reality of cloning--the ability to cultivate an entire being from a single adult cell in an act of asexual reproduction--undercut a human faith in the uniqueness of individual identity, even though it is not possible to duplicate human personality or the life experience that produces it. (latimes.com)