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  • womb
  • Cloning human embryos for transfer into a human womb is illegal in most of the world. (digitaljournal.com)
  • The DNA is used to form a new cell and then the embryo is placed in the womb to continue the reproductive process. (adobe.com)
  • Again here there is the notion that embryos, life in the womb, life before birth, are now going to be used by researchers just as another commodity. (openparliament.ca)
  • So that would mean creating cloned embryos, implanting them and destroying (presumably) those that look imperfect as they grow in the womb. (globalchange.com)
  • While it is true that a clone created for therapeutic uses would be just the same as one created for reproductive use, there could easily be stiff penalties imposed for implanting a cloned embryo into a woman's womb or otherwise trying to allow its development into a child. (cnn.com)
  • Cloning can also be achieved using a technique called embryo splitting, which is the way twins or triplets occur naturally inside a mother's womb. (singularityhub.com)
  • The egg is then stimulated by a pulse of electricity, causing the cells to divide and grow into an embryo, which is implanted into the womb of the woman. (zavos.org)
  • Behind every clone that makes it out of a womb alive, there are hundreds of failures. (discovermagazine.com)
  • A cloned human being, a near-replica of another person, may be gestating in a womb somewhere or may even have been born. (discovermagazine.com)
  • nucleus
  • Cloning animals involves manipulating the nucleus in a cell taken from an adult animal. (toledoblade.com)
  • This involves transferring the nucleus of a cell of an adult (such as the patient requiring transplant) to an unfertilised egg that has had its nucleus removed, which is then stimulated to develop into an embryo. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Cloning requires the precise reprogramming of the nucleus inserted into an enucleated egg," said Schöler, professor of animal biology and director of Penn's Center for Animal Transgenesis and Germ Cell Research. (scienceagogo.com)
  • A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. (kwit.org)
  • Proposals to use nucleus transfer techniques in human stem cell research raise a set of concerns beyond the moral status of any created embryo. (bootstrike.com)
  • Technically, it is not a vast leap to transfer a human nucleus. (dhushara.com)
  • The resulting embryo is then implanted into a surrogate, and that surrogate gives birth to a clone of whatever donated the nucleus. (singularityhub.com)
  • Since the nucleus of virtually every animal cell contains the entire genome of the animal, it might seem easy enough to clone an animal by placing the nucleus in an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this technique, nuclei from cells of an early embryo are extracted using a very fine glass pipette and placed in egg cells that have been shed by a female amphibian such as a frog (after removing the unfertilized egg cell nucleus). (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • identical
  • Illmensee also worked with human embryos, investigating how embryos split to form identical twins. (asu.edu)
  • Human cloning does not refer to the natural conception and delivery of identical twins. (adobe.com)
  • We should treat all clones like we would treat identical twins or triplets. (readthehook.com)
  • It is a human experiment doomed to failure because the child will NOT be identical in every way, despite the hopes of the parents. (globalchange.com)
  • It is rather crude to create a complete embryonic identical twin embryo just to get hold of stem cells to make - say - nervous tissue. (globalchange.com)
  • This policy would make illegal not only the kind of cloning conjured up by Frankensteinian futurists who predict the creation of troops of identical humans to perform dangerous or evil tasks, or in which rich and narcissistic people use cloning to create identical copies of themselves born 30, 40, or even 50 years after the original. (cnn.com)
  • Some groups have claimed in the past to have implanted these human clone embryos, in order to make a baby which is the identical twin of an existing adult, but so far there has been no proof that a human clone has ever been born. (globalchange.com)
  • The Japanese research raises questions about whether extinct animals could be cloned from bodies preserved in permafrost, or indeed if a dead person could be "recovered", cloned as a time-warp identical baby twin made from tissue frozen at or before death. (globalchange.com)
  • And while identical twins of the same age catch the eye, would anyone notice that a middle-aged person's baby was really a clone? (dhushara.com)
  • stem cell res
  • Questions such as these about cloning and stem-cell research-both for disease treatment and prevention and for reproduction-will be the focus of a series of events this spring on the theme, The Political Embryo: Reconceiving Human Reproduction , presented by Mount Holyoke College's Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Center for Leadership. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • Any stem cell research that requires the destruction of human life is unethical. (marymeetsdolly.com)
  • What does such a ban mean for reproductive medicine and stem cell research and its eventual therapeutic applications? (cnn.com)
  • Whatever answer comes from the courts, the ease with which the ban passed through the House and the early rhetoric coming from the Senate indicate that banning cloning may be one way to ease political tensions over stem cell research. (cnn.com)
  • In a horse trade of sorts, legislators seem willing to give up even therapeutic uses of cloning in order to inoculate themselves against charges that funding stem cell research will lead to unacceptable uses of human embryos. (cnn.com)
  • Some opponents of stem cell research, including actor Mel Gibson, say they shouldn´t help pay for cloning human embryos. (mymotherlode.com)
  • The subject was brought to the fore once again when the British government loosened the restrictions governing human cloning in July and granted its first license for cloning for stem cell research on Aug. 11 this year. (dw.com)
  • abnormalities
  • Another aspect is that cloned animals have led to early deaths and abnormalities. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Many attempts at animal cloning produced disfigured monsters with severe abnormalities. (globalchange.com)
  • Besides that many of the offspring produced through cloning suffer abnormalities such as missing or deformed organs. (theroar.in)
  • The success rate for cloning animals is a horrifying 3 to 5 percent - with most clones dying in utero or being born with severe, life-threatening abnormalities. (zavos.org)
  • primates
  • I understand there's already a bit of a race among cutting-edge IVF clinics to get into this technology,' says Don Wolf of the Oregon Regional Primate Center in Beaverton, who works on the cloning of primates. (dhushara.com)
  • In non-human primates this was indeed the conclusion of Simerly et al. (zavos.org)
  • develop into an embryo
  • Then, after a long search, they finally found the best way to stimulate each egg so that it would develop into an embryo without the need to be fertilized with sperm. (kwit.org)
  • infertile couples
  • Although some say that creating a cloned child should be allowed for infertile couples, the number of couples for whom cloning would be the only means to have a child is very small, and once cloning was perfected and permitted for one group it would be all but impossible to contain. (csmonitor.com)
  • Once the public understands the limitations of cloning- e.g., one can't bring back the dead- human cloning will likely be used mostly by infertile couples who have no other choice for bearing biologically related children. (readthehook.com)
  • According to Severino Antinori and Panos Zavos, the purpose of the cloning is to help infertile couples have a child, specifically to counter male sterility. (zavos.org)
  • genetics
  • We now believe that the potential to make a normal human baby with cloning is almost zero," said Dr. Rudolf Jaenisch, professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, at a genetics conference at Maine's Jackson Laboratory. (toledoblade.com)
  • The recommendation to go ahead with therapeutic cloning will clash with the government's stated policies,' said Stuart Newman, a member of the Council for Responsible Genetics . (wired.com)
  • It has led to the destruction of half a million human embryos, to proposals for Dutch-style euthanasia laws, and it has led to human embryo cloning, and genetics. (davidalton.net)
  • 6) One year later, he mass-produced prize cattle embryos for Grenada Genetics in order to raise a perfect stock. (fountainmagazine.com)
  • create
  • However, legislators would be forced to create laws forbidding women from implanting these embryos and carrying them to term. (wired.com)
  • In both cases, the egg is allowed to develop into a hollow ball with inner cell mass , the future embryo, which is harvested and destroyed to create hES cell lines. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Together, those pronuclei combine to create the whole genome required for the embryo to develop. (asu.edu)
  • This is a case in which one is deliberately setting out to create a human being for the sole purpose of destroying that human being," says Dr. Daniel Sulmasy , a professor of medicine and a bioethicist at the University of Chicago. (kwit.org)
  • reproductive cloning, which uses cloning technology to create a human embryo that will produce an entire human, and therapeutic, which adopt cloning into field of medical practices to find a cure for many diseases (Kass). (bartleby.com)
  • Why clone when you could create it yourself? (writework.com)
  • Because cloning is still an inexact technology, Schöler questions both the value and the morality of using it to create humans: "You can do reproductive cloning only if you are willing to do cloning by statistics: cloning 100 organisms to get one that is OK-or might be OK-and you forget the other 99. (discovermagazine.com)
  • babies
  • Even if a few cloned babies are born apparently normal we will have to wait up to 20 years to be sure they are not going to have problems later -for example growing old too fast. (globalchange.com)
  • One organization, Clonaid, has even claimed that they have cloned the first human babies. (writework.com)
  • Zavos
  • The criteria is that they have to consider human reproductive cloning as the only option available to them after they have exhausted everything else," Dr Zavos said. (digitaljournal.com)
  • Could the work of Zavos (2003) and others ever lead us to alter beliefs that clinical success in reproductive cloning is unlikely if not inconceivable? (zavos.org)
  • The trail blazing Antinori and Zavos say they have an answer to this potential dilemma: They say they'll devise a yet-to-be-announced 'perfect' screening method to eliminate the problematic embryos which are doomed to fail. (zavos.org)
  • A reproductive specialist from Kentucky, Zavos made the prediction this past May in a hearing before a congressional subcommittee investigating the issue of cloning humans. (discovermagazine.com)
  • Zavos himself is openly trying to produce a human clone, and he is not alone. (discovermagazine.com)