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  • Get ready for a food fight over milk and meat from cloned animals and their offspring.After more than six years of wrestling with the question of whether meat and milk from them are safe to eat, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to declare as early as next week that they are. (commondreams.org)
  • livestock
  • The FDA had asked producers of cloned livestock not to sell food products from such animals pending its ruling on their safety. (commondreams.org)
  • ViaGen and Trans Ova Genetics, another of the three livestock-cloning companies in the U.S., recently announced a voluntary tracking system that will help food makers, slaughterhouses and marketers to prove, if they choose, that they aren't selling such foods. (commondreams.org)
  • But Tyson Foods Inc., also a member of the institute and one of the nation's largest producers of beef, says the company "currently has no plans to purchase cloned livestock, especially since it will likely be a long time before such animals" are available for market. (commondreams.org)
  • products
  • While many consumer groups still oppose it, the FDA declaration that cloned animal products are safe would be a milestone for a small cadre of biotech companies that want to make a business out of producing copies of prize dairy cows and other farm animals -- effectively taking the selective breeding practiced on farms for centuries to the cutting edge. (commondreams.org)
  • Consumer wariness toward cloned food may lead to a backlash from opponents in Congress and other markets, such as the European Union, who are concerned that not enough data are available for a viable study on the safety of the products. (commondreams.org)
  • Some big food companies say they're not interested in trying to market products from cloned animals or their offspring. (commondreams.org)
  • Dean and others in the food industry are also worried that there is no mandatory tracking system in place for products from clones or their progeny. (commondreams.org)
  • Whole Foods Market is committed to providing consumers with clone-free products," says Margaret Wittenberg, global vice president of quality standards and public affairs for grocer Whole Foods Market Inc. "The lack of effective governmental oversight and tracking could mean consumers will lose the ability to choose clone-free products. (commondreams.org)
  • The meat industry is more bullish on cloned products than the dairy industry. (commondreams.org)
  • cattle
  • Because of the price tag -- cloned cattle cost $15,000 to $20,000 per copy -- most of the cloned animals will be used for breeding, and it will be three to five years before consumers see milk and meat from their offspring. (commondreams.org)
  • The agency has called cloning merely "a more advanced form of" breeding technologies already widely used in the cattle industry, such as artificial insemination, embryo transfer and in vitro fertilization. (commondreams.org)
  • milk
  • Most consumers do not find this appealing," says Marguerite Copel, vice president of corporate communications at Dean Foods Co., one of the nation's largest milk producers, which says it won't sell any milk from cloned animals. (commondreams.org)
  • animals
  • Some animal breeders in the U.S. have already been experimenting with cloning animals. (commondreams.org)
  • ViaGen Inc., the largest animal-cloning company in the nation, has cloned animals, such as a cow named Peggy Sue. (commondreams.org)
  • The Food Marketing Institute, which represents food retailers and wholesalers, says its members tend to "strongly believe" that they must be notified if any of their suppliers intend to introduce cloned animals into the food supply. (commondreams.org)