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  • cows
  • Cloning animals specifically livestock has greatly impacted the environment by producing more milk and dairy from cloned cows. (smore.com)
  • Also because cloned cows also provide more meat. (smore.com)
  • LOWELL -- When cloning pioneer Dr. James Robl first began traveling down the path of embryos and cell nuclei, he just wanted to make a few good cows. (uml.edu)
  • But the agricultural aspect of cloning -- the possibility of providing dairy farmers with more and better cows -- was always the primary goal. (uml.edu)
  • Robl cloned two cows from a bovine named Zita, who produced huge amounts of milk and was ranked as the top cow in the country. (uml.edu)
  • Robl has also done work that transforms cows into producers of human antibodies. (uml.edu)
  • By using cloning techniques, and replacing a cow's antibody genes with a human's, researchers can inject the cow with a vaccine, which forces the cows to produce antibodies to fight off the weakened virus. (uml.edu)
  • On the farm, cloning breeds more productive cows , faster horses, sheep with better wool. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • nucleus
  • This is defined as 'the practice of creating or attempting to create a human being by transferring the nucleus from a human cell into an egg cell from which the nucleus has been removed for the purpose of implanting the resulting product in a uterus to initiate a pregnancy. (freerepublic.com)
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • When an animal is cloned, the nucleus of a mature adult cell is removed and inserted into an egg whose nucleus has been removed. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • favor
  • So it's encouraging to see Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah - whose political and religious bent would suggest outright opposition to cloning research - come out in favor of cloning for medical purposes. (baltimoresun.com)
  • We will begin by formulating the best moral case for cloning-to-produce-children describing both the specific purposes it might serve and the philosophic and moral arguments made in its favor. (georgetown.edu)
  • Indeed, some of the arguments in favor of cloning-to-produce-children appeal to the deepest and most meaningful of our society's shared values. (georgetown.edu)
  • Zavos
  • Could the work of Zavos (2003) and others ever lead us to alter beliefs that clinical success in reproductive cloning is unlikely if not inconceivable? (zavos.org)
  • Siegel stated, "By sponsoring the World Court Initiative, HCPI seeks that the World Court strip away any vestige of legitimacy from potential human cloners, such as Zavos and Antinori. (innovations-report.com)
  • Dr. Zavos and his team are leaders in the field on human reproduction, all forms of ARTs and cloning. (zavos.org)
  • Professor Zavos would like to congratulate his friend, Sir John B. Gurdon on receiving the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize for his research in Stem Cells and Cloning. (zavos.org)
  • Human cloning advocate Dr. Panayiotis Zavos of the Andrology Institute of America testifies before the House Government Reform Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources on Capitol Hill Wednesday, May 15, 2002. (zavos.org)
  • Professor Zavos and his supporters of cloning feel that with the careful continuation of research, the technological benefits of cloning clearly outweigh the possible social consequences. (zavos.org)
  • Dr.Panayiotis Zavos is recognized worldwide as a leading researcher and a strong authority in the areas of male reproductive medicine, gamete physiology, male infertility, Andrology and other forms of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. (zavos.org)
  • organs
  • Organ cloning for transplants is an alternative to organ donation that is done by duplicating cells to regrow tissue and organs in humans who may need a organ donation in order to survive. (smore.com)
  • Clones organs for humans who are in need of it in order to live. (smore.com)
  • Organ cloning transplants can be very expensive after the whole process of finding the organs and the medical bills, from the surgeries and doctor appointments. (smore.com)
  • The unexpected plasticity of adult stem cells has made it possible to use this type of undifferentiated, self-renewing cell successfully for the healing of various human tissues and organs, (1) particularly in hearts damaged after myocardial infarction. (vatican.va)
  • Part 2 Is It Morally Acceptable to Buy and Sell Organs for Human Transplantation? (wiley.com)
  • moral
  • No individual scientist, corporation, business enterprise or nation has the moral or legal warrant to clone human beings. (innovations-report.com)
  • One moral objection often heard is that cloned children would be not ends in themselves, but would be means for their parents' self-aggrandizement (not to mention the means of aggrandizement for Raelian beliefs). (readthehook.com)
  • Reuters) - The Vatican on Friday spelled out Roman Catholic moral teaching on a wide variety of scientific and medical procedures dealing with human reproduction. (reuters.com)
  • The prospect of cloning-to-produce-children raises a host of moral questions, among them the following: Could the first attempts to clone a human child be made without violating accepted moral norms governing experimentation on human subjects? (georgetown.edu)
  • From there we will move to the moral case against cloning-to-produce-children. (georgetown.edu)
  • transplants
  • Organ cloning transplants will affect our future and have a great impact because it will make it easier for people who significantly need and organ to receive it quicker and more efficiently without being put on a waiting list for one. (smore.com)
  • monkeys
  • Yet, how definitive for humans could be evidence derived from rhesus monkeys, a species differing from humans with respect to oocyte size, form of implantation, and perhaps also response to micromanipulation procedures such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)? (zavos.org)
  • The researchers believe this is why - despite initial success in cloning monkeys - other laboratories have been unable to repeat the effort. (abc.net.au)
  • Schatten said his team was experimenting with ways to circumvent these cloning hurdles in monkeys. (abc.net.au)
  • The next stage is using the same process in monkeys and after than, humans. (lifeissues.net)
  • theoretically
  • The following background paper highlights BIO's perspective on the difference between using cloning technology to theoretically clone a human being and the beneficial uses of cloning technology in medicine and agriculture. (bio.org)
  • technology to clone
  • But using cloning technology to clone human cells does not create a new human being. (bio.org)
  • Socially, cloning could be an issue because the availability of technology to clone an individual would not be a great thing for society because it would be costly and it would be unsure as to who should have access to the type of technology that is being used to clone organisms. (smore.com)
  • sperm
  • In fact, the current (1990) Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (HFE Act 1990) already allows the mixing of human and animal gametes (an ovum and a sperm) but this is after licensing for specific experiments and only for the purpose of testing the fertility or normality of sperm and requires that the result of the mixed gametes is destroyed no later than the two cell stage. (lynnejones.org.uk)
  • For example, if a man could not produce sperm, cloning would allow him to have a child who is "biologically related" to him. (georgetown.edu)
  • tissue
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • No person shall knowingly purchase, sell, transfer or otherwise obtain human embryonic, gametic or cadaveric tissue for the purpose of human reproductive cloning. (malegislature.gov)
  • Cloned cells could be used to create replacement tissue for diseased hearts, pancreatic cells for diabetics, treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, nerve cells for victims of spinal cord injuries, and skin cells for burn victims. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Clonaid
  • At one of the oddest press conferences ever, Brigitte Bosselier, a "bishop" in the Raelian UFO cult announced on December 27 that their cloning company, Clonaid, has succeeded in cloning a 7-pound baby girl named Eve. (readthehook.com)
  • However, Clonaid says that it has agreed to let an independent panel chosen by science journalist Michael Guillen determine whether Eve is in fact a clone of her mother. (readthehook.com)
  • And for $200,000 the company Clonaid promises to clone a human baby. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • biology
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • The consequences for humanity when reproductive biology and genetics are combined. (springer.com)
  • clinical
  • The use of normal, cloned human liver cells to test new drugs under development for certain toxic metabolites, for example, would reduce the danger of human clinical trials by eliminating such compounds before human testing. (bio.org)
  • researchers
  • Standing in front of the crowd, with television screens on either side imitating his every move, Robl took his audience through the history of cloning, from the first days in the 1980s, when researchers successfully began transplanting cell nuclei into eggs, to the suddenly real possibility of human cloning. (uml.edu)
  • Prominent researchers have been arguing that cloning animals and humans in particular is risky business. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Researchers have already identified a handful of genes whose activity was not normal in the cloned embryos, affecting their development. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • liver
  • Organ cloning is currently being used by many people who may suffer from any type of organ failure such as heart, kidney, liver, etc. (smore.com)
  • Only a small percentage of cloned animals survive to birth, and those that do are usually subject to a host of health problems including obesity, frequent bouts of pneumonia, and liver failure. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • emotional
  • On the other hand, the considerable emotional and financial investment that the parents of cloned children will be making indicates that these children will be very much wanted and treasured by their families. (readthehook.com)
  • Debate
  • The issue of cloning is back in the news and a subject for debate in Congress. (bio.org)
  • A video presentation on the "to clone/not to clone" debate showed only one reason under the "to clone" column -- treatment for fertility cases. (uml.edu)
  • donor
  • If, for example when using a cell donor animal of 10 years the clone at birth will be as developed as a "normal" young animal that has just been born. (beautyobservatory.gq)
  • genes
  • Well, he or she would be a complete human being who happens to share the same set of genes with another person. (readthehook.com)
  • Clones would be born with certain expectations, goes the argument, because people with their exact set of genes would have lived before them. (readthehook.com)
  • The result was clear differences in how genes functioned in the cloned cells. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • questions
  • But if the House bill passes, many important scientific questions about cloning will be left unanswered - and humanity will likely be the worse for it. (baltimoresun.com)
  • Arguments in defense of cloning-to-produce-children often address questions of reproduction, but they tend to focus on only a relatively narrow sliver of the goods and principles involved. (georgetown.edu)