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  • sperm
  • The egg is then artificially coaxed to divide and behave in a way similar to a standard embryo fertilised by a sperm. (newscientist.com)
  • In a similar experiment, however, we succeeded in prompting human eggson their own, with no sperm to fertilize themto develop parthenogenetically into blastocysts. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Then, after a long search, they finally found the best way to stimulate each egg so that it would develop into an embryo without the need to be fertilized with sperm. (kwit.org)
  • The proposed definition starts at the point of the first cell division after fertilisation of a human egg by a human sperm. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • blastomere separation (sometimes called "twinning" after the naturally occurring process that creates identical twins), i.e., splitting a developing embryo soon after fertilisation of the egg by a sperm (sexual reproduction) to give rise to two or more embryos. (lifeissues.net)
  • mitochondrial
  • A new report by Human Genetics Alert (1) shows that the HFEA has ignored important epigenetic risks to children in its analysis of the safety issues raised by mitochondrial replacement' techniques (2). (hgalert.org)
  • So it is vital that any embryos produced by the mitochondrial replacement techniques (MST/PNT) are checked to make sure that they are normal in this respect. (hgalert.org)
  • nucleus
  • This involves removing the nucleus of a human egg cell and replacing it with the nucleus from a body cell. (newscientist.com)
  • A scientist removes the nucleus from a human egg using a pipette. (kwit.org)
  • There are two ways in which embryos produced by MST/PNT might be effected (i) epigenetic effects caused by the manipulation of embryos, and (ii) epigenetic effects of abnormal mitochondria on the nucleus of oocytes. (hgalert.org)
  • Scientist
  • Even with ESCs from fertilised embryos, it takes a year to get a fully characterised stem cell line," he told New Scientist . (newscientist.com)
  • A top scientist in animal cloning, Chen Dayuan, praised the experiment, saying the generation of human blastulas would hopefully heal patients by replacing cells and organs under pathological change with ones their bodies had developed by healthy means. (trend.az)
  • micromanipulation
  • This will be difficult because it is well known that embryonic development is compromised when in vitro matured oocytes are used, and in cloning technology the oocytes undergo intensive micromanipulation, which makes it even harder to develop good quality blastocysts. (innovations-report.com)
  • gene expression
  • In contrast to the human-animal hybrids, the gene expression pattern of the human clones was highly similar to normal human embryos. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This reassurance hangs on the 1% difference in gene expression between the cloned ES cells and ES cells from IVF embryos. (hgalert.org)
  • Medical value of cloned ES cells: it is clear that the ES cells analysed in the paper, although they seem similar to normal ES cells, are abnormal, with clear differences in gene expression to normal cells. (hgalert.org)
  • the critical period of development to ensure success in separating human blastomeres should be at the time of embryonic gene expression, which is reported in humans to be between the four- and eight-cell stages [twinning by "blastomere splitting" ]. (lifeissues.net)
  • Wilmut
  • But instead of growing healthy human replacement tissue, Dr Wilmut proposes to deliberately clone embryos from patients who have MND in order to "study how the disease progresses in very close detail. (rediff.com)
  • technique
  • The technique dates back to the 1960s, when John Gurdon at Oxford University cloned a frog using just one cell from a tadpole's gut. (publicradioeast.org)
  • And what this group was able to do, by fine-tuning the technology and using detailed knowledge of human reproduction, was to make this technique workable in man. (abc.net.au)
  • infertility
  • Because early embryonic cells are totipotent , the possibility of splitting or separating the blastomeres of early preimplantation embryos to increase the number of embryos that are available for IVF treatment of infertility is being discussed Because embryo splitting could lead to two or more embryos with the same genome, the term "cloning" has been used to describe this practice . (lifeissues.net)
  • deliberately
  • This is a case in which one is deliberately setting out to create a human being for the sole purpose of destroying that human being," says Dr. Daniel Sulmasy , a professor of medicine and a bioethicist at the University of Chicago. (kwit.org)
  • risks
  • The highly invasive embryo manipulations are likely to cause further epigenetic risks. (hgalert.org)
  • HGA argues that the main benefit of the Newcastle techniques, that the mother is genetically related to her child can never justify the safety risks to the child and the social consequences of modifying the human germ line. (hgalert.org)
  • Considerations
  • On Thursday March 6, at 7:30 p.m., a panel discussion, "In Utero: Imaging and Imagining" will address artistic, scientific, and political considerations in visual depictions of human embryos and fetuses. (mtholyoke.edu)
  • tissues
  • We intended to isolate human stem cells from the blastocysts to serve as the starter stock for growing replacement nerve, muscle and other tissues that might one day be used to treat patients with a variety of diseases. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The cloning of DNA, cells, tissues, organs and whole individuals is also achievable with artificial technologies. (lifeissues.net)
  • nuclear transfer
  • Mr Heindryckx said: "To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the development of cloned human embryos using in vitro matured oocytes and non-autologous transfer via a conventional method of nuclear transfer. (innovations-report.com)
  • There is also abundant evidence that invasive assisted reproductive technologies such as the nuclear transfer involved in MST/PNT can cause epigenetic perturbations in embryos and offspring produced by them. (hgalert.org)