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  • populations
  • In a similar vein, other studies using the HUMARA technology had found that hematologic malignancies are clonal diseases even when there is no apparent chromosomal abnormality, and that there are pre-leukemic clonal populations which precede acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (wikipedia.org)
  • The combination of these two ideas, that clonal hematopoiesis might be common in the elderly population and that AML evolves from pre-leukemic populations, led to the hypothesis that malignancy-associated mutations could also contribute to asymptomatic clonal hematopoiesis in healthy individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long-term culture systems allow the continuous propagation of potentially heterogeneous populations of neural stem and progenitor cells in monolayers on substrate-coated plates ( 1 , 2 ) or as suspended, clonal aggregates of cells known as neurospheres ( 3 , 4 ). (pnas.org)
  • mutations
  • However, many of the clonal hypereosinophilias are distinguished from these other hematological malignancies by the genetic mutations which underlie their development and, more importantly, by their susceptibility to specific treatment regiments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based on their association with eosinophils, unique genetic mutations, and known or potential sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors or other specific drug therapies, they are now in the process of being classified together under the term clonal hypereosinophilia or clonal eosinophilia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The establishment of a clonal population may occur when a stem or progenitor cell acquires one or more somatic mutations that give it a competitive advantage in hematopoiesis over the stem/progenitor cells without these mutations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Importantly, these findings described an increase in this nonrandom skewing with increasing age, hinting that unobserved mutations acquired with age could be driving a clonal expansion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This view gained mechanistic support in 2012 when it was found a number of the women who showed evidence for clonal hematopoiesis through X-inactivation skew also had mutations in the hematologic-malignancy-associated gene TET2. (wikipedia.org)
  • The advent of next-generation DNA sequencing has allowed for the targeted identification of somatic mutations involved in clonal hematopoiesis at the population level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The other main common finding is that there are many different mutations involved in clonal hematopoiesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • How do such differ from other mutations/ Cheers and Happy Thanksgiving to all I hope your turkeys are tasty, and good eating and would there be clonal breakdown in such birds brought about by inbreeding? (pacificbulbsociety.org)
  • Examination of the sequence changes at MLST loci during clonal diversification shows that point mutations give rise to new alleles at least 15-fold more frequently than does recombination. (asm.org)
  • Finally, we note a striking excess of nonsynonymous substitutions in comparisons between isolates belonging to the same clonal complex compared to isolates belonging to different clonal complexes, suggesting that the removal of deleterious mutations by purifying selection may be relatively slow. (asm.org)
  • genetic
  • As the HUMARA assay is based on the epigenetic state of cells, the underlying genetic determinants of the clonal expansion remained to be uncovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clonal selection algorithms are most commonly applied to optimization and pattern recognition domains, some of which resemble parallel hill climbing and the genetic algorithm without the recombination operator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though a number of scientific papers devoted to the problem of genetic engineering have casually mentioned that clonal reproduction may someday be with us, the discussion to which I am party has been so vague and devoid of meaningful time estimates as to be virtually soporific. (theatlantic.com)
  • ARCH is defined as the gradual, clonal expansion of HSPCs carrying specific, disruptive, and recurrent genetic variants, in individuals without clear diagnosis of hematological malignancies. (bloodjournal.org)
  • arise
  • A fundamental characteristic of neoplasms is clonality, in that they arise from clonal replication of a single cell whereas reactive processes are derived from polyclonal proliferation. (nih.gov)
  • distinct
  • We can divide multicellularity into two distinct types, aggregative and clonal - which we will discuss in turn (1). (plos.org)
  • Three distinct clonal groups were identified: 2 of them carried the exfoliative toxin (ET) A gene (eta), and the other carried the ETB gene (etb). (mendeley.com)
  • In this study, we asked the question whether a subset of parental cells that are clonogenic in our in vitro system and give rise to neurons and glia could be retrospectively subdivided into distinct subsets of cells with different developmental commitment based on distinct molecular phenotypes of their clonal progeny. (pnas.org)
  • seeds
  • The base gene bank for the USDA National Germplasm System is the National Center for Germplasm Preservation at Ft. Collins, CO. This center holds seeds of agronomic crops, cryopreserved clonal plant materials, animal and bacterial germplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • Clinically, clonal eosinophilia resembles various types of chronic or acute leukemias, lymphomas, or myeloproliferative hematological malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Clonal hypereosinophilia, also termed Primary hypereosinophelia or clonal eosinophilia, is a grouping of hematological disorder characterized by the development and growth of a pre-malignant or malignant population of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the bone marrow, blood, and/or other tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clonal precursor of bone, cartilage, and hematopoietic niche stromal cells. (nih.gov)
  • recognize
  • However, it is not always easy to recognize a clonal colony especially if it spreads underground and is also sexually reproducing. (wikipedia.org)
  • expansion
  • The clonal expansion of those cells can lead to autoimmune diseases, wherein the body attacks itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two of three evaluable cases had a monoclonal pattern of inactivation, and the third case had a clonal expansion of cells with an altered microsatellite repeat sequence. (nih.gov)
  • specific
  • This specific clonal army then combats the pathogen until the body is free of the infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • The progeny generated in vitro from a parental clone-forming cell during neurosphere formation demonstrate intra-clonal heterogeneity in the expression of neural lineage-specific markers. (pnas.org)
  • known
  • The only known plant of King's Lomatia (Lomatia tasmanica) in Tasmania is a clonal colony estimated to be 43,600 years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Clonal seborrheic keratosis is a common benign cutaneous condition characterized by a skin lesion with a dull or lackluster surface, and with round, loosely packed nests of cells seen histologically. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • I do not know, but the term clonal breakdown was the term we used, other factors may well have played a part, but let us not blame virus for all such occurrences, especially after tests were made to see if virus was present. (pacificbulbsociety.org)
  • individuals
  • A clonal colony or genet is a group of genetically identical individuals, such as plants, fungi, or bacteria, that have grown in a given location, all originating vegetatively, not sexually, from a single ancestor. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • All the strains in the more dominant eta-positive clonal group and some of the strains in the etb-positive clonal group were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) showing borderline-to-moderate resistance to beta-lactams. (mendeley.com)
  • growth
  • Clonal growth strategies are abundant in alpine habitats. (uzh.ch)
  • The advantages of clonal growth include a high persistence in time and space, physiological integration and high tolerance to stress, spreading and foraging, as well as division of labour among parts of a clone. (uzh.ch)
  • An in vitro system has been developed that exploits serum and anchorage withdrawal, and a medium supplemented with methyl cellulose and pleiotropic growth factors [epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), and insulin] to generate clonal neurospheres from rodent and human brain ( 5-7 ). (pnas.org)