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  • genetics
  • Second, it covers current human genetics, clinical studies, and the syndromes of abnormal sex differentiation.With chapters by preeminent reproductive biologists, this is a capital work. (textbookx.com)
  • A new report by Human Genetics Alert (1) shows that the HFEA has ignored important epigenetic risks to children in its analysis of the safety issues raised by mitochondrial replacement' techniques (2). (hgalert.org)
  • Human Genetics Alert's report is attached. (hgalert.org)
  • 1. Human Genetics Alert is an independent secular watchdog group that supports abortions rights. (hgalert.org)
  • An on-line version derived and updated from these CDs is pending release through Twisted Ladder Media, and is entitled: 'The New Genetics: Medicine and the Human Genome. (stanford.edu)
  • oocytes
  • First, human granulosa cells were placed in enucleated bovine oocytes, electrostimulated, and shown to develop at least as often as occurs in parthenogenesis. (zavos.org)
  • WORCESTER, Mass., Feb. 2 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTC Pink Sheets: ACTC) and its collaborators reported today that human oocytes (or 'eggs') have the capacity to extensively reprogram adult human cells. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Hall VJ, Compton D, Stojkovic P, Nesbitt M, Herbert M, Murdoch A, Stojkovic M. Developmental competence of human in vitro aged oocytes as host cells for nuclear transfer . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Homer HA, McDougall A, Levasseur M, Murdoch AP, Herbert M. RNA interference in meiosis I human oocytes: Towards an understanding of human aneuploidy . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • But human eggs (oocytes) are in very short supply. (cbc-network.org)
  • implications
  • Facts about identical twins, parent-child resemblance, and what happens when parents seek to replace a dead child are fascinating in their own right, and provide useful analogies for the implications of human cloning. (waterstones.com)
  • biotechnology
  • The most practical use of biotechnology, which is still present today, is the cultivation of plants to produce food suitable to humans. (bionity.com)
  • donor
  • Due to the serious shortage of human donor eggs, cows, rabbits, and other animals have long been considered an attractive surrogate source of eggs. (bio-medicine.org)
  • abnormalities
  • Chronic reproductive abnormalities will be discussed in detail using the current literature, including hypothalamic amenorrhea, polycystic ovarian syndrome and premature menopause. (evms.edu)
  • species
  • Yet, how definitive for humans could be evidence derived from rhesus monkeys, a species differing from humans with respect to oocyte size, form of implantation, and perhaps also response to micromanipulation procedures such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)? (zavos.org)
  • researchers
  • Prominent researchers have been arguing that cloning animals and humans in particular is risky business. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • Using a special technique called DNA microarray analysis, in which large numbers of genes are examined on a gene chip, the researchers were able to measure the functioning of more than 10,000 genes in cells from cloned mice. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • social consequences
  • In this brilliant and intriguing book, Levick anticipates the psychological and social consequences of human reproductive cloning. (waterstones.com)
  • HGA argues that the main benefit of the Newcastle techniques, that the mother is genetically related to her child can never justify the safety risks to the child and the social consequences of modifying the human germ line. (hgalert.org)
  • regulation
  • We have demonstrated bcl-xl down-regulation in human mesothelioma cells at the protein and mRNA level by both antisense oligonucleotide and full-length adenoviral antisense constructs leads to apoptotic human cell death in vitro. (survivingmesothelioma.com)
  • Our goals are to understand the mechanism of transcriptional up-regulation of the bcl-xl gene in this tumor, and to find a more effective clinical treatment for malignant mesothelioma. (survivingmesothelioma.com)
  • Dysfunction
  • Homer HA, McDougall A, Levasseur M, Murdoch AP, Herbert M. Spindle assembly checkpoint dysfunction: A molecular correlate for human aneuploidy . (ncl.ac.uk)
  • dignity
  • Thus, the Holy See earnestly encourages investigations that are being carried out in the fields of medicine and biology, with the goal of curing diseases and of improving the quality of life of all, provided that they are respectful of the dignity of the human being. (vatican.va)
  • 13) From an anthropological standpoint, most people recognize that cloning is offensive to human dignity. (vatican.va)
  • Human lives, souls, and dignity are at stake! (apologeticspress.org)
  • Professor
  • In addition to her law school affiliation, Professor Daar is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCI School of Medicine. (uci.edu)
  • In 2013, Professor Daar was awarded the Suheil J. Muasher, M.D. Distinguished Service Award by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) for her service to this professional organization. (uci.edu)
  • As a leading voice in the reproductive medicine arena, Professor Daar has been quoted and interviewed widely by news outlets, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, and ABC News. (uci.edu)
  • and Associate Professor Pamela McCombe, a clinical neurologist. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • physiology
  • But when I was studying human physiology, I became very enamored of science and medicine," she says. (bu.edu)
  • Agriculture
  • Agriculture - Cloning is used for applications in agriculture.These include producing animals with desirable qualities such as disease resistance, longevity, or improved traits. (bio.org)
  • J. B. S. Haldane was the first to introduce the idea of human cloning, for which he used the terms "clone" and "cloning", which had been used in agriculture since the early 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Thus far, these human replacement cells appear to function normally in vitro, raising the possibility for their application in the treatment of devastating chronic diseases affecting these tissue types. (bio.org)
  • liver
  • Only a small percentage of cloned animals survive to birth, and those that do are usually subject to a host of health problems including obesity, frequent bouts of pneumonia, and liver failure. (genomenewsnetwork.org)
  • ethicists
  • At the same time, many religious ethicists -- most notably Roman Catholics and evangelical Christians -- remain firmly opposed to all forms of cloning. (beliefnet.com)
  • Fertility
  • In fact, the current (1990) Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act (HFE Act 1990) already allows the mixing of human and animal gametes (an ovum and a sperm) but this is after licensing for specific experiments and only for the purpose of testing the fertility or normality of sperm and requires that the result of the mixed gametes is destroyed no later than the two cell stage. (lynnejones.org.uk)
  • Human Fertility 2007, 10 (3), 183-187. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Human Fertility 2006, 9 (1), 47-51. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • eggs
  • These new results suggest that while bovine and rabbit eggs are capable of supporting limited cell division, specific reprogramming towards the normal human embryonic state does not occur. (bio-medicine.org)