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  • ototoxicity
  • Other drugs (such as the aminoglycoside antibiotic class) may also cause ototoxicity, and the administration of this class of antibiotics in patients receiving cisplatin is generally avoided. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ototoxicity of both the aminoglycosides and cisplatin may be related to their ability to bind to melanin in the stria vascularis of the inner ear or the generation of reactive oxygen species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nausea
  • Nausea and vomiting: cisplatin is one of the most emetogenic chemotherapy agents, but this symptom is managed with prophylactic antiemetics (ondansetron, granisetron, etc.) in combination with corticosteroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • apoptosis
  • While triggering apoptosis through interfering with DNA replication remains the primary mechanism of cisplatin, this has not been found to contribute to neurological side effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • interstrand
  • The planar compound links to nucleobases through water displacement of one or both of its chloride groups, allowing cisplatin to form monoadducts to DNA or RNA, intrastrand DNA crosslinks, interstrand DNA crosslinks, and DNA-protein crosslinks. (wikipedia.org)
  • When cisplatin forms interstrand crosslinks (5'-GC), there is a severe distortion to the DNA helix due to a shortened distance between guanines on opposite strands and a cytosine that is flipped out of the helix as a consequence of the GG interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • drug
  • This page contains brief information about cisplatin and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials. (cancer.gov)
  • By targeting mitochondria with the anticancer drug cisplatin, chemists have developed a new way to kill cancer cells that have shown resistance to cisplatin. (scitechdaily.com)
  • TPMT is now listed as a pharmacogenomic biomarker for adverse drug reactions to cisplatin by the FDA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cisplatin is a Chemotheraputic drug that is commonly used to treat solid malignancies such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and lymphomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • interferes
  • Cisplatin is a cancer medication that interferes with the growth of cancer cells and slows their growth and spread in the body. (cigna.com)
  • Cisplatin interferes with DNA replication, which kills the fastest proliferating cells, which in theory are carcinogenic. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Cisplatin is also being studied in the treatment of other types of cancer . (cancer.gov)
  • While you are being treated with cisplatin, and after you stop treatment with it, do not have any immunizations (vaccinations) without your doctor's approval. (mayoclinic.org)
  • An ethanolic extract of T. camphoratus treatment further enhanced the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and doxorubicin. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • resistance
  • Cisplatin may lower your body's resistance and there is a chance you might get the infection the immunization is meant to prevent. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Baicalein reversed the resistance of human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells to cisplatin. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • TMEM205 has been shown to be involved in Cisplatin resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cleft lip and palate transmembrane protein 1-like protein (CLPTM1-like protein), also known as cisplatin resistance-related protein 9 (CRR9p), is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CLPTM1L gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • LUC7 like 3 pre-mRNA splicing factor (LUC7L3), also known as Cisplatin resistance-associated overexpressed protein, or CROP, is a human gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • This gene encodes a cisplatin resistance-associated overexpressed protein (CROP). (wikipedia.org)
  • kidneys
  • Cisplatin can harm your kidneys , and this effect is increased when you also use certain other medicines harmful to the kidneys. (cigna.com)
  • Patients
  • Find Clinical Trials for Cisplatin - Check for trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials now accepting patients. (cancer.gov)
  • Not all cisplatin side effects are listed above, some that are rare (occurring in less than 10% of patients) are not listed here. (chemocare.com)
  • lung
  • Cisplatin was tested by intraperitoneal administration in mice, increasing the incidence of lung tumours. (inchem.org)
  • mechanism
  • The former is more accepted owing to the similarity of the leaving groups with its predecessor cisplatin, while the latter hypothesis envisages a biological activation mechanism to release the active Pt2+ species. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • The amount of cisplatin that you receive depends on many factors, including your height and weight, your general health or other health problems, and the type of cancer that you have. (chemocare.com)
  • cells
  • Cisplatin can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections and help your blood to clot. (cigna.com)
  • Cisplatin can temporarily lower the number of white blood cells in your blood, increasing the chance of getting an infection. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Cisplatin is a mutagen in bacterial and cultured mammalian cells. (inchem.org)
  • It has been shown to be located at the plasma membrane in humans tissues and translocates to the nuclear envelope when cells become resistant to Cisplatin. (wikipedia.org)