• The bark and other parts of the cinchona tree contain quinine, cinchonine, and other alkaloids that have antimalarial, tonic, and antiseptic effects. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • chĭngkō`nə) , name for species of the genus Cinchona, evergreen trees of the madder madder, common name for the Rubiaceae, a family of chiefly tropical and subtropical trees, shrubs, and herbs, especially abundant in N South America. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Cinchona officinalis Linn.f. is commonly known as Crown bark in English belongs to family Rubiaceae. (semanticscholar.org)
  • In vitro germination and shoot proliferation of the threatened species Cinchona officinalis L (Rubiaceae). (semanticscholar.org)
  • Cinchona officinalis (Rubiaceae) is an endemic species of the Loja Valley in southern Ecuador with medicinal uses. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Using Cinchona calisaya as a model, we generated genetic profiles of leaf samples from four plastid (trnL-F, matK, rps16, and ndhF) and one nuclear (ITS) DNA regions from twenty-two C. calisaya stands sampled in the Yungas region of Bolivia. (frontiersin.org)
  • The Bolivian Cinchona calisaya Wedd. (frontiersin.org)
  • The dried bark of Cinchona Ledgeriana Moens, Cinchona Calisaya Weddell, and of hybrids of these with other species of Cinchona (Fam. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • The trees are now cultivated elsewhere for "Peruvian bark," the source of quinine quinine , white crystalline alkaloid with a bitter taste. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • For centuries, Cinchona alkaloids were the primary treatment of malaria. (frontiersin.org)
  • Part XI: The Cinchona alkaloids in the treatment of benign tertian malaria. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • Evaluating Cinchona bark and quinine for treating and preventing malaria. (jameslindlibrary.org)
  • Bis-(cinchona alkaloid) ligands (which are generally the better catalysts) catalyze the formation of diols of high enantiopurity from a very broad range of olefins. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • A significant phylogenetic signal was found for the content of two out of four major Cinchona alkaloids (quinine and cinchonidine) and their total content. (frontiersin.org)
  • Cinchonidine sulphate, (C 19 H 22 N 2 O) 2 ,H 2 SO 4 ,3H 2 O, is the salt of a base found in cinchona bark. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • When the bark of the Cinchona tree is peeled back or chipped off, a bitter red liquid seeps out. (medicinal-foods.com)
  • Synthetically modified cinchona alkaloids are typical chiral organocatalysts used in asymmetric PTC. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have proven to catalyze an astonishing array of enantioselective transformations, providing access to chiral products of high enantiopurity. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In connection with our ongoing project that deals with the catalytic potential of the cinchona-alkaloid-derived amides,[17-19] we became interested in examining the reaction of allenoates with imines in the presence of a chiral tertiary amine catalyst. (docme.ru)
  • The medicinal value of Cinchona bark was first discovered in Loxa (now Loja, Ecuador) in the seventeenth century by Jesuit monks, and soon exports of different varieties of Cinchona pubescens Vahl (red bark) from South America to Europe were reaching half a million kilograms bark per year ( Roersch van der Hoogte and Pieters, 2015 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • In an attempt to further improve catalyst enantioselectivities, Jew and Park linked two cinchona alkaloid moieties via spacer units. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In particular, the cinchona alkaloids catalyze many useful processes with high enantioselectivities. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The dried bark of Cinchona succirubra Pavon (Fam. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • U. S. "Red Cinchona Bark is the dried bark of the stem and branches of cultivated plants of Cinchona succirubra, Pav. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • Climatic and soil parameters were characterized and bark samples were analyzed for content of the four major alkaloids using HPLC-UV to explore the utility of evolutionary history (phylogeny) in determining variation within species of these compounds under natural conditions. (frontiersin.org)
  • At the present time (1917) thirty or forty more or less clearly defined species of Cinchona are recognized. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • Cinchona alkaloids can be used as bases to deprotonate substrates with relatively acidic protons forming a contact ion pair between the resulting anion and protonated amine. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Subsequently, these cinchona alkaloids were used for the osmium-catalyzed asymmetric aminohydroxylation of olefins. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • Cinchona is classified in the division Magnoliophyta Magnoliophyta , division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Despite a ban on export, Europeans sent cinchona seeds and seedlings to Java and India, where plantations were established. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Of all of these probably but four with their cultivated hybrids yield the Cinchona Bark of commerce. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • The literature of the cinchona hybrids is hopelessly confused by the same name being frequently used by different authorities for the different hybrids and the one hybrid having various names. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • Import could not meet demand, and a quest began for the most productive source of Cinchona trees to establish plantations by the British, Dutch, and French empires. (frontiersin.org)
  • A clade of high alkaloid producing trees was identified that spanned a narrow range of altitudes, from 1,100 to 1,350 m. (frontiersin.org)
  • The bark of the uprooted tree is beaten loose, peeled by hand, and dried quickly to prevent the loss of alkaloids. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • So successful were the Dutch and English in transplanting cinchona to Java and India that until World War II these countries, especially Java, grew practically the entire commercial supply. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Four years later, Linne proposed a new name, Cinchona , in honor of the Countess of Chinchon, who first made the bark known in Europe. (henriettes-herb.com)
  • As a result of selection, the alkaloid content in the bark was raised from 2-2.5 percent to 16 percent. (thefreedictionary.com)