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  • ENCODE
  • Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE pilot project. (nih.gov)
  • 2003 ). The ChIP-chip approach has also been extensively used by the ENCODE consortium to map functional elements in the human genome ( http://www.genome.gov ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Architecture of the human regulatory network derived from ENCODE data. (gersteinlab.org)
  • It is confirmed that SON regulates the splicing process of transcripts (RNAm) that will encode the gens that are going to regulate the pluripotency of the embryonic human cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pair
  • For example, in the human genome, which has a 42% GC content, a pair of nucleotides consisting of cytosine followed by guanine would be expected to occur 0.21 * 0.21 = 4.41% of the time. (wikipedia.org)
  • microarray
  • 2003) Transcript profiling of human platelets using microarray and serial analysis of gene expression. (els.net)
  • silico
  • To elucidate the precise relationship between GC content and Giemsa banding patterns, we developed an " in silico chromosome staining" method for reconstructing Giemsa bands computationally from the whole human genome sequence. (pnas.org)
  • RNAs
  • Evidence for transcript networks composed of chimeric RNAs in human cells. (nih.gov)
  • 2012). The GENCODE v7 catalog of human long noncoding RNAs: analysis of their gene structure, evolution, and expression. (springer.com)
  • widespread
  • Lister R, Pelizzola M, Dowen RH et al (2009) Human DNA methylomes at base resolution show widespread epigenomic differences. (springer.com)
  • mammalian
  • In the beginning of the 21st century, when the first genomes were made available it was clear that isochores do not exist in the human genome nor in other mammalian genomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • We gathered genomic evidence for pseudogenic exons (ΨEs, i.e ., exons disabled by frameshifts and premature stop codons), to examine for significant trends in their distribution across four mammalian genomes (specifically human, cow, mouse and rat). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • differences
  • Understanding the similarities and differences in how macaques and humans respond, at the functional genomic level, to perturbations in their environments has significant relevance in biomedical research. (els.net)
  • regions
  • 8 ) were converted to the Human Genome Assembly version (HG18, March 2006), and the regions were uniformly resized to 800 bp symmetrically with respect to the center. (aacrjournals.org)
  • frequency
  • The frequency of CpG dinucleotides in human genomes is 1%-less than one-quarter of the expected frequency. (wikipedia.org)
  • The frequency of these splice variants differs greatly in human fetal brain. (deepdyve.com)
  • Disorders
  • Known human disorders include Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, which may be caused by duplication of the gene encoding peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) on chromosome 17. (wikipedia.org)