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  • inversions
  • Chromatid paints will provide scientists with an easy-to-read test, currently a missing piece to further research pinpointing certain diseases such as cancer, to better detect specific rearrangements within chromosomes like inversions," said Susan Bailey, CSU researcher and a KromaTiD founder. (innovationews.com)
  • segments
  • The colors in your Chromosome Painting tell you about your Ancestry Composition, but you can learn even more by looking at the number and length of the DNA segments assigned to each ancestry. (23andme.com)
  • ancestry
  • The Chromosome Painting feature is an in-depth way of looking at your Ancestry Composition results. (23andme.com)
  • The Y chromosome follows a special pattern of inheritance and isn't used to generate your Ancestry Composition report, so it is shown in gray. (23andme.com)
  • If you are male, you inherited all of the ancestry painted on your X chromosome from your mother. (23andme.com)
  • If you have the same ancestry painted in the same place on both copies of a chromosome, then you inherited the same ancestry from both of your parents in that region of your genome. (23andme.com)
  • Below you can see an example of someone who inherited British & Irish ancestry (dark blue) on both copies of chromosome 15. (23andme.com)
  • The confidence slider on the Chromosome Painting allows you to explore our estimates of your genetic ancestry at different probability cutoffs. (23andme.com)
  • For example, if a segment of your DNA has a 55 percent chance of being Japanese, then that segment will be painted as Japanese at the 50 percent confidence level, but it will be painted with a more broad ancestry (one of Broadly Japanese & Korean, Broadly East Asian & Native American, or Unassigned) at the 60 to 90 percent confidence levels. (23andme.com)
  • For a detailed technical explanation of how we calculate your ancestry and paint your chromosomes, check out the Ancestry Composition Guide . (23andme.com)
  • Populations sharing more ancestry share more chunks, and individual chunks give clues about the underlying ancestry along chromosomes. (medicalxpress.com)
  • we've painted them with your Ancestry Composition results. (23andme.com)
  • Lastly, we also look at ancestry on your X chromosome: two copies like the autosomes if you are female, and only one copy if you're male (that you got from mom). (23andme.com)
  • chromatin
  • Previous work has demonstrated a more decondensed large-scale chromatin structure and a more internal nuclear position for gene-rich versus gene-poor chromosome regions. (biologists.org)
  • Here, we show that large-scale chromatin opening and changes in intranuclear positioning of chromosome regions can be induced by normal levels of endogenous transcription factors acting on mammalian regulatory sequences. (biologists.org)
  • Our results indicate that both large-scale chromatin decondensation and changes in nuclear positioning as observed for large, complex gene-rich chromosome regions can be reproduced by endogenous regulatory sequences acting within simple repetitive transgene arrays. (biologists.org)
  • somatic
  • Benirschke K, Brownhill LE, Beath MM (1962) Somatic chromosomes of the horse, the donkey and their hybrids, the mule and the hinny. (springer.com)
  • Composition
  • Sex chromosomes in the genus Leporinus (Teleostei, Anostomidae) present some features that make this group very interesting for the study of sex determination mechanisms and sex chromosome structure, composition and evolution. (biomedcentral.com)
  • relatively
  • Although chromosome analysis is routinely used in diagnosing disease, predicting its prognosis and deciding the optimal treatment plan, the conventional chromosome banding analysis (karyotyping) has limitations due to its relatively lower resolution or poor contrast of the chromosome G- or Q-banging patterns. (spiedigitallibrary.org)