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  • serum
  • Today, consumers meet abundant supply of functional foods with plant stanol increments for serum cholesterol lowering purposes. (chiro.org)
  • Serum lipids, lipoprotein lipids, and non-cholesterol sterols were determined at baseline, during intervention, and 4 weeks afterwards. (chiro.org)
  • Cholesterol precursor sterol lathosterol reflected cholesterol synthesis, and serum plant sterols and cholestanol mirrored cholesterol absorption. (chiro.org)
  • When compared with controls, 8.8 g/day of plant stanols reduced serum and LDL cholesterol by 12 and 17% (P (chiro.org)
  • Changes in serum cholesterol, non-cholesterol sterols, and plant stanols were normalized during post-treatment weeks. (chiro.org)
  • Serum plant stanol levels remained at comparable low levels as in studies with daily intake of 2-3 g, and were normalized in 4 weeks suggesting that daily intake of 8.8 g of plant stanols might not increase systemic availability of plant stanols, but reduces effectively serum cholesterol and plant sterol levels. (chiro.org)
  • steroids
  • Bile acids are C24 steroids that are derived in the liver from cholesterol and secreted into the intestinal lumen to aid in emulsification of dietary lipids and lipid-soluble vitamins. (wku.edu)
  • 3. Cholesteryl 3beta-acetate is hydrolysed by bovine adrenal-cortex mitochondria in vitro to free cholesterol, which is subsequently oxidized to more polar steroids and isocaproic acid. (biochemj.org)
  • A number of other Delta(5)-3beta-hydroxy steroids inhibit cholesterol oxidation and evidence was obtained that the 3beta-hydroxyl group was necessary for inhibitory activity. (biochemj.org)
  • lipoprotein
  • Soy is also suggested to have an effect on plasma cholesterol, via increased plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and soy may also protect low density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Remnant cholesterol, also known as remnant lipoprotein, is a very atherogenic lipoprotein composed primarily of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL). (wikipedia.org)
  • Usually the enzyme produced is responsible for cholesterol ester formation and high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, but in fish-eye disease the enzyme cannot esterify, or make the acid into an alkyl, cholesterol in HDL particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • High-density lipoprotein is commonly called the "good" part of cholesterol. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxidation
  • This domain is positioned over the isoalloxazine ring system of the FAD cofactor bound by the FAD-binding domain and forms the roof of the active site cavity, allowing for catalysis of oxidation and isomerisation of cholesterol to cholest-4-en-3-one. (wikipedia.org)
  • The conversion of cholestanol to cholesterol was already demonstrated by oxidation of the ketone, bromination to the bromoketone and elimination to the enone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore
  • Furthermore, cholesterol embolism may develop after the commencement of anticoagulants or thrombolytic medication that decrease blood clotting or dissolve blood clots, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, all CDCs contain a highly conserved undecapeptide, which is thought to be critical for cholesterol-mediated membrane recognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • Even if the habit of eating frequently, or exercising regularly, or abstaining from smoking, or living a non-stressed life may lower the cholesterol concentration, there is no evidence either that this effect may influence the risk of cardiovascular disease by itself. (bmj.com)
  • Health professionals can share these social media messages, graphics, and resources to educate their audiences about cholesterol and cardiovascular disease prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • Current strategies for controlling cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, are not widely used as standard practice. (cdc.gov)
  • CDC Vital Signs for February focuses on cardiovascular disease, specifically control of hypertension and cholesterol. (cdc.gov)
  • metabolism
  • The International conference enlightens the recent advancements related to Diabetes, cholesterol metabolism and aims on sharing the knowledge of the expertise in this field where the new generation scholars and researchers can increase their knowledge related to diabetes and metabolic diseases. (conferenceseries.com)
  • ME Conferences welcome the delegates across the globe to enlighten the young and fresh minds of the scholars, researchers, student communities and industrial delegates to attend the "International Conference on Diabetes and Cholesterol Metabolism'' as it is open to research methodologies which explores the new dimensions regarding this field. (conferenceseries.com)
  • bloodstream
  • Cholesterol embolism (often cholesterol crystal embolism or atheroembolism, sometimes blue toe or purple toe syndrome or trash foot or warfarin blue toe syndrome) occurs when cholesterol is released, usually from an atherosclerotic plaque, and travels as an embolus in the bloodstream to lodge (as an embolism) causing an obstruction in blood vessels further away. (wikipedia.org)
  • problems with other organs may arise, depending on the site at which the cholesterol crystals enter the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood vessels
  • The main problem is the distinction between cholesterol embolism and vasculitis (inflammation of the small blood vessels), which may cause very similar symptoms - especially the skin findings and the kidney dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • An immunoglobulin protein, anti-cholesterol may be found both in circulation as well as in the digestive tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-1), the major protein component of HDL, acts as an acceptor, and the phospholipid component of HDL acts as a sink for the mobilised cholesterol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The enzymatic structure of the human cholesterol-24 hydroxylase was determined via crystallography at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, and was shown to be a 57kDa (500 residues) monomeric heme-containing protein bound to the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons. (wikipedia.org)