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  • travelers
  • Travelers , public health and medical professional s and outbreak responders should be aware of areas with high rates of cholera, know how the disease spreads, and what to do to prevent it. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk of cholera to U.S. travelers is so low that vaccination is of questionable benefit. (world66.com)
  • Travelers to cholera-affected areas should be advised to avoid eating high-risk foods, especially fish and shellfish. (world66.com)
  • Hygiene
  • In addition, efforts are being made to strengthen community mobilization, health and hygiene education, and to de-stigmatize cholera among potentially-affected populations. (who.int)
  • India
  • Though cholera has been around for many centuries, the disease came to prominence in the 19th century, when a lethal outbreak occurred in India. (history.com)
  • One of the first detailed accounts of a cholera epidemic comes from Gaspar Correa-Portuguese historian and author of Legendary India-who described an outbreak in the spring of 1543 of a disease in the Ganges Delta, which is located in the south Asia area of Bangladesh and India. (history.com)
  • Numerous reports of cholera manifestations along the West coast of India by Portuguese, Dutch, French and British observers followed throughout the next few centuries. (history.com)
  • In 1821, British troops traveling from India to Oman brought cholera to the Persian Gulf. (history.com)
  • The Southeast Asia Region, which includes Bangladesh and India, has the largest populations at risk for cholera 1 . (cdc.gov)
  • populations
  • However, the case-fatality rate reaches 9% in remote areas, indicating that rural populations affected by cholera do not have access to treatment rapidly enough to save lives. (who.int)
  • Vaccinations
  • Red Cross volunteers receive cholera vaccinations before heading up to Banda Aceh, Indonesia, to take part in tsunami relief efforts in January 2005. (cbc.ca)
  • treatment
  • Severe cholera, without treatment, kills about half of affected individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 kits are designed for the treatment of cholera patients within existing structures at the central, peripheral and community levels. (who.int)
  • The main treatment for cholera is fluid and electrolyte replacement, both oral and IV. (medicinenet.com)
  • Rapid treatment with fluid and electrolytes result in better outcomes while people with other health problems beside cholera or those who are not rapidly replenished with fluid treatments tend to have a poorer prognosis. (medicinenet.com)
  • In addition, modern-day sewage and water treatment systems have largely eliminated cholera from developed countries. (cbc.ca)
  • Partners are already there and are establishing a cholera treatment centre. (smh.com.au)
  • John Snow
  • Quarantine measures based on the findings of John Snow kept cholera out of Britain and the United States. (cbc.ca)
  • health
  • In order to improve laboratory investigations, cholera rapid diagnostic tests are being distributed to selected facilities and health care staff trained on their use. (who.int)
  • The Department of Health has reported a cholera outbreak in the Mpumalanga region. (who.int)
  • MSF believes cholera may be just the beginning of a nightmare health crisis in the southern African country. (cnn.com)
  • Health workers offer food to a father and son suffering from cholera symptoms at a local hospital in Harare on Tuesday. (smh.com.au)
  • A health worker attends to a child suffering from cholera symptoms in Harare. (smh.com.au)
  • incidence
  • The correlation between socioeconomic and demographic indices and cholera incidence in Latin America. (cdc.gov)
  • water
  • Cholera is mainly transmitted through contaminated water and food and is closely linked to inadequate environmental management. (who.int)
  • The reasons for the (cholera) outbreak are clear: lack of access to clean water, burst and blocked sewage systems, and uncollected refuse overflowing in the streets, all clear symptoms of the breakdown in infrastructure resulting from Zimbabwe's political and economic meltdown,' the MSF report said. (cnn.com)
  • The latest cholera outbreak happened after burst sewers in Budiriro and Glenview suburbs contaminated water in boreholes and open wells, which are used by residents, said Moyo. (smh.com.au)