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  • Genetic
  • Human genetic chimerism, which can not only cause a wide range of illnesses but also lead to the same person having more than one profile in genetic fingerprinting, has served as a plot device in many works of fiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most known examples are subsequent to the 2004 book Free Culture, where author Lawrence Lessig digresses briefly to describe chimerism and suggest that it could, and had yet to, be well used as a television plot device (particularly for police procedurals involving genetic fingerprinting). (wikipedia.org)
  • Chapters in this section focus on the effects of chimerism on testing in relationship determination and forensics, prenatal genetic testing and screening, and blood and HLA typing. (springer.com)
  • Paul Bradbury Kamloops, BC, Canada Kemlo Rogerson wrote: >I have a student that wants to follow a NVQ (National Vocational >Qualification) and has chosen Chimerism (Genetic Mosaicism) about which >I know nowt. (histosearch.com)
  • A genetic chimerism or chimera (also spelled chimaera) is a single organism composed of cells with distinct genotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • 46,XX/46,XY chimerism can be identified during pregnancy by prenatal screening or in early childhood through genetic testing and direct observation. (wikipedia.org)
  • An increase in the amount of genetic information, such as Chimerism or Heterochromia. (wikipedia.org)
  • twins
  • The basis for this approach was the observation that red cell chimerism in the majority of dizygotic freemartin cattle twins that shared a common placenta [ 2 ] persisted into adulthood. (omicsonline.org)
  • In nonidentical twins, chimerism occurs by means of blood-vessel anastomoses. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may result from intrauterine exchange of erythrocyte precursors between twins (twin chimerism) or two fertilized eggs fuse into one individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • The chimerism arises in utero from the combination of an XX zygote and an XY zygote (which otherwise would have developed into twins) into a single embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • recipients
  • BOSTON, Jan. 23 -- Six organ-transplant recipients have remained healthy for up to five years without anti-rejection drugs, said researchers in the U.S. and Australia whose strategy was chimerism. (medpagetoday.com)
  • whereby
  • In humans (and perhaps in all placentals), the most common form is fetomaternal microchimerism (also known as fetal cell microchimerism or fetal chimerism) whereby cells from a fetus pass through the placenta and establish cell lineages within the mother. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3) Weak expression of the A or B blood group antigen 4) In some diseases, for example leukaemia A true chimerism is a rare sporadic phenomenon whereby an individual has a dual cell population derived from more than one zygote. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • The second part of the volume outlines clinical identification and consequences of chimerism. (springer.com)
  • Written by experts in the field, Chimerism: A Clinical Guide is a valuable resource for clinicians and researchers that will help guide patient management and stimulate investigative efforts. (springer.com)
  • individuals
  • Since chimerism changes the degrees of relatedness between individuals, it also changes the adaptive value of certain behaviors, like cooperatively raising young. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • This chimerism is the result of cell lines exchanged between siblings in utero. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chimerism may be due to either co-ligation of multiple genomic segments into a single YAC, or recombination of two or more YACs transformed in the same host Yeast cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • complexity
  • Tandem Chimerism as a means to increase protein complexity in the human genome Parra et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number of alleles in the profile established by the STR panel at the time of the pre-transplant chimerism analysis will determine the complexity of the post-transplant chimerism analysis. (uhhospitals.org)
  • patients
  • In an accompanying editorial, Thomas Starzl, M.D., the University of Pittsburgh liver transplant pioneer, questioned the disappearance of chimerism in these patients. (medpagetoday.com)