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  • remission
  • From 1994 to 2000, 154 adults with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph + ) and/or BCR-ABL + acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated according to a prospective trial (median follow-up, 4.5 years) with the aim to study the prognostic value of early response to therapy and the role of stem cell transplantation (SCT) in first complete remission (CR). (bloodjournal.org)
  • Infection
  • 2001. Association of human parvovirus B19 infection with acute meningoencephalitis. (asmscience.org)
  • Following the acute phase of the infection, the primary VZV infection is resolved, and the virus begins a dormant phase in the sensory nerve ganglia of the individual. (nap.edu)
  • survivors
  • According to a study from 1994, Japanese survivors of the atomic bomb in World War II had an increased risk of acute leukemia six to eight years after exposure. (healthline.com)
  • patients
  • RATIONALE: Supportive care, such as healing touch, may improve quality of life in patients receiving chemotherapy for acute leukemia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Within 1 week of admission to the hospital, patients are interviewed by a research assistant about previous use of complementary or alternative medicine therapies, knowledge of healing touch (HT), previous experience with HT, willingness to participate in a study of HT for acute leukemia patients, and willingness to be randomized in a HT study. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients with a history of CNS leukemia undergo craniospinal irradiation before transplantation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Since 1978 more than 3000 adult patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) have been treated according to the protocols of the German Multicenter Study Group for Adult. (naver.com)
  • Symptoms
  • Symptoms of acute pancreatitis include: (pain in the upper abdomen that worsens with eating, swollen and tender abdomen, nausea, vomiting, fever, and rapid pulse). (chemocare.com)
  • risk
  • A 2013 follow-up study reinforced the connection between atomic bomb exposure and the risk of developing leukemia. (healthline.com)