Loading...
  • traumatic spinal cord i
  • The development of an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) inevitably leads to a complex cascade of ischemia and inflammation that results in significant scar tissue formation. (thejns.org)
  • Raised intrathecal pressure (ITP) following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a critically important aspect of injury development that may result in significantly greater tissue damage and worsened functional outcome. (biomedsearch.com)
  • disorders
  • More information can be found in Small Animal Spinal Disorders , 2nd edition, by NJH Sharp & SJ Wheeler, Elsevier, London. (vin.com)
  • lesion
  • The radiofrequency rhizotomy, also known as RF lesion is usually done under local anesthesia whereas the balloon compression is done under general anesthesia. (docplayer.net)
  • flexion
  • At initial examination cervical range of motion was limited (flexion, extension, left and right rotation), and he reported pain specifically at the end of extension. (thelessinstitute.com)
  • The slump test "was performed with the patient sitting and was assessed through a combination of sitting thoracolumbar flexion, cervical flexion, ankle dorsiflexion, and knee extension. (wordpress.com)
  • The femoral stretch test was "performed with the patient side-lying on the nonaffected side, assesses the presence/absence of neural mechanosensitivity (L2-4) using a combination of thoracolumbar flexion, cervical flexion, knee flexion, and hip extension. (wordpress.com)
  • syndrome
  • A postoperative MRI demonstrated a large area of high signal changes on T2-weighted MRI intrinsic to the cord "white cord syndrome" but no residual compression. (hindawi.com)
  • We describe this occurrence as a "white cord syndrome" because of the postoperative appearance of a large area of cord edema behind the massive herniated disc seen on sagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (thelessinstitute.com)
  • Large breed dogs also suffer from cervical disc disease, usually as part of the syndrome of caudal cervical spondylomyelopath. (vin.com)
  • The focus of physical therapy in central cord syndrome (CCS) is the preservation of range of motion (ROM) and the enhancement of mobility skills. (medscape.com)
  • Given the predominance of upper extremity weakness that occurs in central cord syndrome, the restoration of the basic activities of daily living (ADLs), upper extremity strength, and ROM are the main goals of occupational therapy. (medscape.com)