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  • Spinal Cord I
  • This was shown in human Muse cells infused into animal models with fulminant hepatitis, partial hepatectomy, muscle degeneration, skin injury, stroke and spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Injection of CD34+ hematopoietic Stem Cells has been clinically applied to treat various diseases including Spinal Cord Injury, Liver Cirrhosis and Peripheral Vascular disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research has shown that CD34+ cells are relatively more in men than in women in the reproductive age among Spinal Cord Injury victims. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clinical and animal studies have been conducted into the use of stem cells in cases of spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • self-renewal
  • Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity for self-renewal and under appropriate stimulation give rise to osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. (hindawi.com)
  • The laboratory is currently focused on understanding the cellular and molecular regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence, survival, self-renewal, and cell fate. (cancer.gov)
  • The laboratory is currently defining the physiological function of the inhibitor of DNA binding (Id) family of proteins in self-renewal, quiescence and cell fate determination. (cancer.gov)
  • Since transcriptional regulators are frequently deregulated or mutated in hematopoietic malignancies, our current focus is to understand how transcription factors and transcription factor networks regulate quiescence, self-renewal and cell specification using mouse models, normal stem cells, and stem cell line models. (cancer.gov)
  • Id1-/- HSCs show increased self-renewal in serial bone marrow transplantation (BMT) assays, which is correlated with decreased proliferation, decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, and decreased ROS production. (cancer.gov)
  • The classical definition of a stem cell requires that it possesses two properties: Self-renewal: the ability to go through numerous cycles of cell division while maintaining the undifferentiated state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unipotent cells can produce only one cell type, their own, but have the property of self-renewal, which distinguishes them from non-stem cells (e.g. progenitor cells, which cannot self-renew). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to mention that Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells (LT-HSCs) in mice and humans are the hematopoietic cells with the greatest self-renewal capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symmetric division gives rise to two identical daughter cells, both endowed with stem cell properties, whereas asymmetric division produces only one stem cell and a progenitor cell with limited self-renewal potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hematopoietic stem cells can of course undergo self-renewal, and are multipotent cells that give rise to erythrocytes (red blood cells), megakaryocytes/platelets, mast cells, T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, monocyte/macrophage, and granulocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapeutic
  • This is crucial to the use of hematopoietic components derived from human ES or other pluripotential cells for therapeutic purposes. (labome.org)
  • This project will provide important basic and practical data on conditions to drive human hematopoietic development along the myeloid lineage from ES cell lines and their outcome for therapeutic approaches. (labome.org)
  • WASHINGTON , Jan. 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Bone marrow is a leading source of adult stem cells, which are increasingly used for research and therapeutic interventions, but extracting the cells is an arduous and often painful process. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In this study, researchers hypothesized that the adipose tissue might be a valuable alternative source of HSPCs as an extramedullary tissue but questioned whether the tissue could provide a sufficient quantity of cells to be used for research and therapeutic purposes. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Owing to these efforts, immunomodulation is emerging as a potential therapeutic target to improve bone fracture healing. (springer.com)
  • A better understanding of osteoimmunity could result in the emergence of therapeutic targets for bone healing. (springer.com)
  • So far skeletal myoblasts, bone marrow-derived cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, and resident cardiac cells have been applied for therapeutic myocardial regeneration. (hindawi.com)
  • Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells derived from human term placentas (PMSCs) are novel therapeutic agents and more topical than ever. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Leung AY, Kwong YL (2010) Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: current concepts and novel therapeutic strategies. (springer.com)
  • Since transcription factors and epigenetic regulators are frequently deregulated in hematopoietic malignancies, it is anticipated that these studies will lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents. (cancer.gov)
  • To help discover the therapeutic uses of these stem cells they are grown in laboratories or by using medication to stimulate new cell growth within the human body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nevertheless, these cells are being investigated as the basis for a number of therapeutic applications, including possible treatments for diabetes and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes cells that naturally secrete the relevant therapeutic factors, or which undergo epigenetic changes or genetic engineering that causes the cells to release large quantities of a specific molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell plasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • Within this review we will discuss the functional role of immune cells as it pertains to bone fracture healing. (springer.com)
  • Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles. (harvard.edu)
  • showed that human dermal fibroblast-derived Muse cells were efficiently differentiated into melanin-producing functional melanocytes by a cocktail of cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • a donor's healthy bone marrow reintroduces functional stem cells to replace the cells lost in the host's body during treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Models of acute or chronic leukemia established using cancer cells collected from patients (A complete list of publications is available here) A highly sensitive platform for studying epithelial and cancer stem cells Establishing a functional, humanized immune system from engrafted human hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors Humanized models for studying human-specific infectious diseases like HIV, Epstein Barr virus, malaria, and Dengue fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells which could give rise to functional vasculature in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although bone marrow-derived cells do appear to localize to injured vessels and promote an angiogenic switch, other studies have suggested these cells do not contribute directly to the functional endothelium, instead acting via paracrine methods to provide support for the resident endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • myeloid
  • We propose to selectively direct the development of human ES cells to hematopoiesis towards myeloid development, focusing on conditions to generate osteoclasts. (labome.org)
  • Second, osteoclasts are derived from a myeloid progenitor which has not been fully described in humans and that we have been studying in murine systems for the past six years. (labome.org)
  • Generation of hematopoietic myeloid progenitors and mature osteoclasts from human ES cell lines. (labome.org)
  • We will test the conditions to insert specific genes in hES cells with restricted expression in the myeloid system, including mature osteoclasts. (labome.org)
  • While some other authors have contested these, and maintained that they are true EPCs, many investigators have begun to term these cells colony forming unit-Hill cells (CFU-Hill) or circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) instead (depending on the method of isolation), highlighting their role as hematopoietic myeloid cells involved in promoting new vessel growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy
  • In this issue, eight articles address different aspects of manufacturing cells for cell therapy. (hindawi.com)
  • The second group deals with application and optimizing of cell therapy and consists of three papers (those of N. E. Rekittke et al. (hindawi.com)
  • Geração de Murino Marcapasso Cardíaco Agregados célula com base na ES-Cell-Programação em combinação com Myh6-Promotor-Seleção Christian Rimmbach 1 , Julia J. Jung 1 , Robert David 1 1 Reference and Translation Center for Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy, University of Rostock Este protocolo descreve como produzir tecido nodal sinusal funcional a partir de células-tronco pluripotentes murino (PSC). (jove.com)
  • Generazione di Murine Cardiac pacemaker aggregati di cellule Sulla base ES-Cell-programmazione in combinazione con MYH6-Promoter-Selection Christian Rimmbach 1 , Julia J. Jung 1 , Robert David 1 1 Reference and Translation Center for Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy, University of Rostock Questo protocollo descrive come produrre funzionale del seno tessuto nodale da cellule murine staminali pluripotenti (PSC). (jove.com)
  • They hence may serve as a novel source of hepatocyte-like cells suitable for cell therapy of acute liver diseases. (mdpi.com)
  • Cell therapy originated in the nineteenth century when scientists experimented by injecting animal material in an attempt to prevent and treat illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today two distinct categories of cell therapy are recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy can be defined as therapy in which cellular material is injected into a patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • The origins of cell therapy can perhaps be traced to the nineteenth century, when Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard (1817-1894) injected animal testicle extracts in an attempt to stop the effects of aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1931 Paul Niehans (1882-1971) - who has been called the inventor of cell therapy - attempted to cure a patient by injecting material from calf embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow transplants have been found to be effective, along with some other kinds of human cell therapy - for example in treating damaged knee cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent times, cell therapy using human material has been recognized as an important field in the treatment of human disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The experimental field of Stem cell therapy has shown promise for new types of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In allogeneic cell therapy the donor is a different person to the recipient of the cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy is targeted at many clinical indications in multiple organs and by several modes of cell delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem-cell therapy is the use of stem cells to treat or prevent a disease or condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • this is the only form of stem-cell therapy that is widely practiced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another stem-cell therapy called Prochymal, was conditionally approved in Canada in 2012 for the management of acute graft-vs-host disease in children who are unresponsive to steroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recognition of his research accomplishments and leadership in moving basic science discoveries in stem cell biology into the clinic, he was elected President of the International Society of Cellular Therapy (1995-1997), Treasurer of the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (1995-2002) and President of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (1999-2000). (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • Although such attempts produced no positive benefit, further research found in the mid twentieth century that human cells could be used to help prevent the human body rejecting transplanted organs, leading in time to successful bone marrow transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even more studies followed Dr. Joseph Murray's first successful kidney transplantation in 1954 and scientists, facing the ethical questions of organ donation for the first time, accelerated their effort in looking for alternatives to human organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • This technique has also been proposed as an alternative source of human organs for future transplantation into human patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Washed off cells reach other organs or die, which can be an issue at the time of prepare ICH module 8. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • He then went to Dalhousie University, completing his MSc in cell physiology under Dr. Gordon Kaplan on A Radiological Investigation of Two Cellular Enzyme Systems of Yeast (1964). (wikipedia.org)
  • From a cellular perspective, available techniques are monolayer cell construct onto temperature-sensitive polymer, where their detachment is driven by behavior of the mechanical properties of the synthetic support without the need of any enzymatic digestion such as trypsin. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was also shown that the two SC compartments acted in accord to maintain a constant cell population and a steady cellular turnover. (wikipedia.org)
  • The further specialized a cell is, the more differentiated it is and as a result it is considered to be more committed to a certain cellular lineage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neural cells, for example, express growth-associated proteins, such as GAP-43, tubulin, actin, an array of novel neuropeptides, and cytokines that induce a cellular physiological response to regenerate from the damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • The team shows that many of the factors which bind to the same gene regions ('hotspots') and their work provide a working model of the transcriptional networks at play within the cells, and how these intracellular networks are linked to events that can be influenced by external stimuli. (medindia.net)
  • According to the research team, the combinational wiring of transcription factors may be helpful in deciphering the code behind gene expression program in ES cells. (medindia.net)
  • The NOD/ShiLtJ background also contributes an allele of the Sirpa gene that renders the bone marrow niche very permissive to colonization by human hematopoietic stem cells. (wikipedia.org)