Loading...
  • Tianjin
  • On November 2015, a Chinese biotech company Boyalife Group announced that it will partner with Hwang's laboratory, Sooam Biotech, to open the world's largest animal cloning factory in Tianjin as early as 2016. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2015 the Chinese company BoyaLife announced that in partnership with the Korean company Sooam Biotech, they were planning to build a factory in Tianjin, China to produce 100,000 cloned cattle per year, starting in 2016 to supply China's growing market for quality beef. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • It should be noted that no babies were born as a result of this research, and the researchers had no intention of producing a live cloned human being. (www.nhs.uk)
  • When these stem cells were tested, researchers found that the cells were able to develop into other types of cells in a manner similar to that seen in stem cells derived directly from embryos. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers report that previous attempts to produce embryonic stem cells using this technique have failed, as the cells stopped dividing before they reached an advanced enough stage. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This study will no doubt be very exciting for researchers working with stem cells, but we're still a long way from the findings of this study being translated into new treatments for conditions such as Parkinson's disease or heart disease . (www.nhs.uk)
  • Researchers then optimised methods to prompt the egg cell to start and continue to divide using electricity and chemical compounds, including caffeine. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers showed that the resulting embryos could develop to a stage where they could produce healthy stem cells containing the genes from the skin cells. (kwit.org)
  • The news that South Korean researchers have become the first to produce human embryos and stem cells through cloning has revived a complex debate about whether such research should be permitted in the United States. (nytimes.com)
  • But since the human cells used in the study appeared even more fragile, researchers said it was unlikely that clones could be made. (abc.net.au)
  • Researchers say other stem cell sources may be easier and less controversial. (abc.net.au)
  • Based on meticulous mammalian study review, the researchers concluded that the rigorous procedures developed for mammalian reproduction held promise for practical application in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line production. (wikipedia.org)
  • manipulation
  • We are now faced with the possibility of mastering the art of this manipulation to the point of being able to clone in research laboratories the cells that, in other circumstances, lead to fully developed human beings. (questia.com)
  • tissue
  • The resulting stem cells could then possibly be used to repair damaged tissue, or even treat genetic conditions. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The only region in which chick nuclei appeared at significantly greater frequency than in control tissue was the dorsal thigh muscle, the region into which the cloned chick cells were placed originally. (biologists.org)
  • Our new special issue is packed with articles that use mathematical and physical approaches to gain insights into cell and tissue patterning, morphogenesis and dynamics, and that provide a physical framework to capture these processes operating across scales. (biologists.org)
  • The resulting embryos were then used as a source of stem cells, which can be used to create specialised tissue cells for transplant operations. (abc.net.au)
  • Chromosomal instability of murine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in long-term culture and development of cloned embryos. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Adipose tissue stem cells: the great WAT hope. (semanticscholar.org)
  • Because of their plasticity and potentially unlimited capacity for self-renewal, embryonic stem cell therapies have been proposed for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • divide
  • The resultant cell is then induced to divide, usually by applying an electric shock, to form an embryo which is a genetic copy (ie a "clone") of the original body cell. (abc.net.au)
  • Tong demonstrated that in hairy sea squirts, during the third division of cells in an embryo, cells divide unequally. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic material
  • Actually the nice thing about this is that if you had some genetic disease(like cystic fibrosis) you could take the genetic material out of one of your skin cells, correct it, and then use that with this process to make an embryo. (slashdot.org)
  • Next, they removed most of the DNA from each egg and replaced the genetic material with DNA from other peoples' skin cells. (kwit.org)
  • The offspring having all of the mother's genetic material are called full clones and those having only half are called half clones. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • The nucleus of a body cell is removed and inserted into an egg cell which has had its nucleus removed. (abc.net.au)
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • raises
  • This raises serious problems because it is the first actual human cloning," Sulmasy says. (kwit.org)