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  • migration
  • A Travelling Fellowship from Journal of Cell Science allowed her to spend time in Prof Maddy Parson's lab at King's College London, learning new cell migration assays and analysing fibroblasts cultured from individuals with Parkinson's. (biologists.org)
  • Swap70 functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac and RhoA regulating F-actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and playing a crucial role in mammalian cell activation, migration, adhesion and invasion. (nottingham.ac.uk)
  • migrate
  • At certain times and places they need to bind strongly, whereas at other points they need to bind more weakly, and only when these processes are regulated appropriately can a cell migrate properly. (nanowerk.com)
  • The researchers used this fibroblast-created matrix to test how cells migrate through a three-dimensional structure. (eurekalert.org)
  • In 2012, however, Petrie and Yamada showed that when fibroblasts migrate they can switch to a different movement strategy when placed in a three-dimensional matrix, using blunt protrusions called lobopodia. (eurekalert.org)
  • Exo70 proteins that were mutated so they couldn't form oligomers were unable to effectively migrate, the researchers discovered, underscoring the importance of the molecule in helping cells make directed movements. (upenn.edu)
  • They modified the stiffness of the embryo tissues using actin and myosin - the same molecules used for muscle contraction - and found the hardness at which NC cells migrate. (london-nano.com)
  • In order to determine whether the neurons failure to migrate was due to factors within the cell or the extracellular environment, the researchers transplanted trilobite neurons in the brains of normal embryos and normal neurons in trilobite brains. (innovations-report.com)
  • From birth until death, our cells migrate: nerve cells make their vital connections, embryonic cells move to the proper places to form organs, immune cells zero in to destroy pathogenic organisms, and cancer cells metastasize, spreading deadly disease through the body. (innovations-report.com)
  • A pulldown-purification assay revealed that knockdown of TRPM7 prevents cells from activating Rac and Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) when stimulated to migrate into a cellular wound. (biochemj.org)
  • To form the streak, reptiles, birds and mammals arrange mesenchymal cells along the prospective midline, establishing the second embryonic axis, as well as the place where cells will ingress and migrate during the process of gastrulation and germ layer formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In response to fluidic shear stress, for example, cells have been shown to migrate in the direction of the fluid flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The observation that certain cell types seeded on a substrate rigidity gradient migrate up the gradient (i.e. in the direction of increasing substrate stiffness) was first reported by Lo et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells migrate easily and quickly in packs[citation needed], so when one cell moves the rest follow in response to the gradient and initial cell movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • Recent breakthroughs have uncovered how different cellular proteins are turned 'on' or 'off' at the molecular level, but much remains to be understood about how protein signaling influences cell behavior. (photonics.com)
  • A new technique developed by Dr. Klaus Hahn and his colleagues uses light to manipulate the activity of a protein at precise times and places within a living cell, providing a new tool for scientists who study the fundamentals of protein function. (photonics.com)
  • A photoactivatable protein enables control of cell movement in living cells. (photonics.com)
  • Hahn, who is the Thurman professor of Pharmacology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a member of UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, described the technique (published in Nature ), which uses light to control protein behavior in cells and animals simply by shining light on the cells where they want the protein to be active. (photonics.com)
  • The technology has exciting applications in basic research - in many cases the same protein can be either cancer-producing or beneficial, depending on where in a cell it is activated. (photonics.com)
  • Because we first tested this new technology on a protein that initiates cell movement, we can now use light to control where and how cells move. (photonics.com)
  • Further and larger studies are need to confirm the assay's ability to determine the behavior of these cells, he cautions, but the research is a significant step because cell migration rates -- and survival time -- cannot be predicted using available genetic- or protein-based tests designed to predict treatment response. (eurekalert.org)
  • As part of the research, the researchers compared nanoscale images of mouse fibroblasts with time-stamped light images of fluorescent Rac1-a protein that regulates cell movement, response to force or strain (mechanosensing), and pathogen invasion-using SBP's cryo-electron microscope (Titan Krios), artificial intelligence (AI), and custom-made computational and cell imaging techniques. (azonano.com)
  • The protein they examined, Exo70, induces a reshaping of the cell's plasma membrane, a necessary step in how a cell migrates from one location to another. (upenn.edu)
  • Writing in the August issue of the scientific journal Nature Cell Biology, the researchers report the discovery that a single protein facilitates the movements of cells within the developing embryo of the zebrafish, a small fish that has become an important animal model for studying the development of vertebrates, animals with backbones. (innovations-report.com)
  • The researchers report that this protein plays an essential role in directing the migration of cells within the spherical egg to the head-tail axis where the body is beginning to take shape. (innovations-report.com)
  • They also found that disruption of the same protein inhibits the normal migration of nerve cells within the developing zebrafish brain, a type of motion found in human brain development. (innovations-report.com)
  • The same protein has previously been identified in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, where it affects the orientation of cells that form the fly s wings and compound eyes. (innovations-report.com)
  • A Burnham Institute study has identified a fragment of a protein that senses chemicals that induce a cell to move into the right direction. (innovations-report.com)
  • Regulation of vascular endothelial cell polarization and migration by Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein. (labome.org)
  • As a kinase, the protein has been linked to the control of actomyosin contractility, whereas the channel has been found to regulate cell adhesion as well as cellular Mg 2+ homoeostasis. (biochemj.org)
  • Recently, septum site determining protein (Ssd) was discovered in this bacteria as a septum inhibitor, leading to elongated cells (not only in this species but also in Mycobacterium smegmatis). (wikipedia.org)
  • In this model, there is another protein Mre, which is not exactly involved in the maintenance of cell shape but in the cell cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • This mechanism allows for localized tagging of the protein and makes EosFP an appropriate tool for tracking protein movement within living cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • Nanowerk News ) Scientists at The University of Manchester have identified the method by which cells control the recycling of molecules, a process that is essential for them to move. (nanowerk.com)
  • These molecules are able to grab hold of the fibres surrounding the cell, like hands, allowing the cell to drag its self along. (nanowerk.com)
  • By manipulating the molecules in this way we found that we could either force the cells to move in a fast forward motion or stop altogether. (nanowerk.com)
  • His lab looked to exocytosis, or the organized process by which cells carry proteins to the membrane in vesicles and then release important molecules such as hormones and neurotransmitters to travel elsewhere in the body. (upenn.edu)
  • It is the first time that the mechanical properties of the environment surrounding embryonic cells has been shown to be crucial in cell movement and development, rather than genes or molecules. (london-nano.com)
  • PIP3 is a lipid that accumulates on the leading edge of a cell about to move, usually in response to a number of outside cellular attractants like chemokines, growth factors and other molecules. (innovations-report.com)
  • Along with it, DOCK180 brings a host of additional molecules to the leading edge, triggering a series of internal events that begin moving the cell forward. (innovations-report.com)
  • membrane
  • They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine, generating pressure that thrusts the cell's plasma membrane forward. (eurekalert.org)
  • Here enucleated recipient cells are treated with cytochalasin B. Cytochalasin B makes the cytoplasm of the oocytes more fluid and makes it possible to aspirate the nuclear genome of the oocyte within a small vesicle of plasma membrane into a micro-needle. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the prokaryotes, all the intracellular water-soluble components (proteins, DNA and metabolites) are located together in the cytoplasm enclosed by the cell membrane, rather than in separate cellular compartments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eukaryotes are organisms, including humans, whose cells have a well defined membrane-bound nucleus (containing chromosomal DNA) and organelles. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this point the zebrafish embryo contains three portions, an epithelial monolayer known as the enveloping layer (EVL), a yolk syncytial layer (YSL) which is a membrane-enclosed group of nuclei that lie on top of the yolk cell, and the deep cells (DEL) of the blastoderm which will eventually form the embryo's three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm). (wikipedia.org)
  • Janet Plowe was a biologist credited for helping to discover the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1931 she demonstrated that the cell membrane is physical, instead of an interface between two different liquids. (wikipedia.org)
  • She discovered the elasticity and composition of several large organelles, and the cell membrane itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytokinesis
  • Another group found that CB inhibits the ability of HeLa cells to undergo cytokinesis by decomposition of the contractile ring. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multinucleate cells, depending on the mechanism they are formed, can be divided into: Syncytia (formed by cell fusion) Coenocytes (formed by nuclear division not being followed by cytokinesis) Some biologists use the term "acellular" to refer to multinucleate cell forms (syncitia and plasmodia), such as to differentiate "acellular" slime molds from the purely "cellular" ones (which do not form such structures). (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, multinucleate cells are produced from specialized cell cycles in which nuclear division occurs without cytokinesis, thus leading to large coenocytes or plasmodia. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryos
  • We've known that cell movement is essential for many processes in the body including the formation of embryos and cancer spread, but until now, most effort has been put into understanding the molecular cues that drive movement, rather than the role the mechanical environment plays ," explained study lead author, Professor Roberto Mayor (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology). (london-nano.com)
  • Cell motions continue to be disordered and do not develop the same sense of direction and purpose in the mutant as they do in normal embryos. (innovations-report.com)
  • But Chandrasekhar and his Missouri team discovered that this movement does not take place in trilobite embryos. (innovations-report.com)
  • The sculpting of embryos during development involves coordinated movement of cells in large groups. (sciencemag.org)
  • Despite our understanding of actomyosin function in individual migrating cells, we know little about the mechanisms by which actomyosin drives collective cell movement in vertebrate embryos. (sciencemag.org)
  • Treating embryos with the microtubule depolymerizing agent nocodazole completely blocks epiboly of the YSL and partially blocks epiboly of the blastoderm, while treating with the microtubule stabilizing agent taxol blocks epiboly of all cell layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, zebrafish embryos that fail to make a fully differentiated EVL show defects in epibolic movements of the DEL, EVL, and YSL, suggesting a requirement for a normal EVL for the epiboly of all three cell layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryo
  • Biologists at Vanderbilt and the University of Missouri have uncovered what could be a major clue into the mysterious molecular processes that direct cells to the correct locations within a developing embryo. (innovations-report.com)
  • The collective movements of convergent extension drive both global reorganization of the early embryo and local remodeling during organogenesis. (sciencemag.org)
  • The marginal zone of a chick embryo contains cells that will contribute to the streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells overlaying Koller's Sickle in the posterior end of the chick embryo move towards the midline, meet and change direction towards the center of the epiblast. (wikipedia.org)
  • As these cells move and concentrate at the posterior end of the embryo, the streak undergoes a single- to multi-layered epithelial sheet transition that makes it a macroscopically visible structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is one of many movements in the early embryo that allow for dramatic physical restructuring (see morphogenesis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Epiboly in zebrafish is the first coordinated cell movement, and begins once the embryo has completed the blastula stage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blastoderm begins to thin as it spreads toward the vegetal pole of the embryo until it has completely engulfed the yolk cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Assay
  • H. Gruler, Cell Movement Analysis in a Necrotactic Assay, Blood Cells 10: 107 (1984). (springer.com)
  • The assay, so far tested on the cells of 14 glioblastoma patients, has the potential, they say, to predict how quickly and aggressively a given cancer might lethally spread. (eurekalert.org)
  • Quinones-Hinojosa says results of several experiments with the assay suggest that tumors with the fastest cells paralleled the quicker recurrence and other clinical outcomes of 14 glioblastoma patients at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. (eurekalert.org)
  • Chemotaxis
  • It is shown that chemotaxis, galvanotaxis, galvanotropism, contact guidance, etc., are functions of cells having a goal-seeking system which is an automatic controller having a closed-loop feedback system. (springer.com)
  • R. T. Tranquillo, D. A. Lauffenburger, and S. H. Zigmond, A Stochastic model for Leukocyte Random Mobility and Chemotaxis Based on Receptorbinding Fluctuations, J. Cell Biol. (springer.com)
  • E. L. Becker, H. J. Showell, P. H. Naccache, and R. Sha'afi, Enzymes in Granulocyte Movement: Preliminary Evidence for the Involvement of Na + , K + AT-Pase, in Leukocyte Chemotaxis, J. I. Gallin and P. G. Quie, eds. (springer.com)
  • tissues
  • In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. (eurekalert.org)
  • Cells that form facial features need surrounding embryonic tissues to stiffen so they can move and develop, according to new UCL-led research. (london-nano.com)
  • We've found a new link between two previously unconnected processes - the thickening and hardening of tissues and the movement of cells. (london-nano.com)
  • She confirmed that the limb tissues gave rise to undifferentiated blastema cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The blastema was the formed internal tissues, not the reserve cells or the epidermis, that gave rise to the regenerating limb. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • They found that it decodes the vast array of signals outside the cell and functions as a molecular switch to dictate whether the strong or weak binding integrins are recycled. (nanowerk.com)
  • Further, the researchers desire to extend the protocol to visualize an increased number of structures that are formed in response to other molecular signals and to further develop the technology to make other areas of the cell accessible. (azonano.com)
  • protrusion
  • Activation of Rac in the red circle led to localized cell protrusion and translocation of the kinase PAK to the cell edge (right hand image, Pak in red). (photonics.com)
  • Interestingly, visualization of dInR -depleted BC clusters, using time-lapse imaging, revealed a delay in detachment of BC clusters from the surrounding anterior follicle cells and altered protrusion dynamics. (biologists.org)
  • We see a protrusion form first, in which the cell changes shape and extends towards the direction it is about to go, followed by movement of the rest of the cell," Vuori said. (innovations-report.com)
  • behavior
  • These data illuminate the interface between developmental signaling systems and the fundamental machinery of cell behavior and should provide insights into the etiology of human birth defects, such as spina bifida and congenital kidney cysts. (sciencemag.org)
  • Xenopus
  • She then completed her Ph.D. in zoology with John Scholes as her mentor at King's College London in 1982 Her first publication "Cell movements in Xenopus eye development" in Nature magazine in 1980 highlighted the movements of the cells during development based on the eye polarity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular
  • H. Gruler, Cell Movement and Symmetry of the Cellular Environment, Z. Naturforsch. (springer.com)
  • Several mechanisms, including oriented cell division, cell-cell intercalation and chemotactic cell movement, have been proposed to explain the nature of the cellular movements required to form the primitive streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • These variants have been successful in the tracking of cellular components without disturbing function in the host cell and maintain the same photophysical properties as wild-type Eos. (wikipedia.org)
  • morphogenesis
  • Our new special issue is packed with articles that use mathematical and physical approaches to gain insights into cell and tissue patterning, morphogenesis and dynamics, and that provide a physical framework to capture these processes operating across scales. (biologists.org)
  • Biology
  • R. Nuccitelli, Transcellular ion currents: Signals and effectors of cell polarity, Modern Cell Biology, 2: 451 (1983). (springer.com)
  • The researchers designed the cell racetracks, which they described earlier in a 2012 PLOS Biology study , by engineering a glass slide with tiny plastic, parallel ridges going down its length. (eurekalert.org)
  • The research, published in the journal Developmental Cell , was co-led by graduate students Yuting Zhao and Jianglan Liu, both members of senior author Wei Guo 's lab in the Department of Biology . (upenn.edu)
  • concluded study first author Dr Elias H Barriga (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology and the UCL London Centre for Nanotechnology). (london-nano.com)
  • The study, led by associate professor and Burnham Cancer Center Acting Director Kristiina Vuori, M.D., Ph.D., appears in the August issue of Nature Cell Biology. (innovations-report.com)
  • Betty finally retired from the Cell Biology department of Harvard Medical School in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • undergo
  • All groups undergo cell shape changes such as the characteristic flattening of cells to increase surface area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial morphological plasticity refers to changes in the shape and size that bacterial cells undergo when they encounter stressful environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the corneal stroma, keratocytes within the wounded area undergo apoptosis, leaving the stroma devoid of cells that must be replaced. (wikipedia.org)
  • extracellular
  • Our work elucidated a highly intriguing question: how cells move when they are in the complex and physiologically relevant environment of a 3-D extracellular matrix," said Hyun (Michel) Koo, a professor in the Department of Orthodontics at Penn's School of Dental Medicine. (eurekalert.org)
  • They found that the pressure was significantly higher in cells moving in a three-dimensional extracellular matrix compared to cells moving along a two-dimensional surface or in a three-dimensional matrix that wasn't cross linked like the fibroblast-derived matrix. (eurekalert.org)
  • bacterial
  • Genetic exchange and recombination still occur, but this is a form of horizontal gene transfer and is not a replicative process, simply involving the transference of DNA between two cells, as in bacterial conjugation. (wikipedia.org)
  • This type of movement has been observed in phylogenetically diverse bacteria such as cyanobacteria, myxobacteria, cytophaga, flavobacteria, and mycoplasmas, and may play an important role in biofilm formation, bacterial virulence, and chemosensing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacterial morphology changes help to optimize interactions with cells and the surfaces to which they attach. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • These classic tissue culture tools, however, only permit two-dimensional movement, very different from the three-dimensional movements that cells make in a human body. (eurekalert.org)
  • We were surprised to see how important tissue hardness is for movement - it's the difference between walking on a hard pavement relative to soft sand. (london-nano.com)
  • They found that during development, the tissue holding the NC cells stiffens and becomes denser with cells which triggers the cells' orchestrated movement. (london-nano.com)
  • The mesoderm gives rise to many cell types such as muscle, bone, and connective tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gruler
  • H. Gruler and K. Franke, Automatic Control and Directed Cell Movement, Z. Naturforsch. (springer.com)
  • H. Gruler and R. Nuccitelli, New insights into galvanotaxis and other directed cell movements an analysis of the translocation distribution function, in: Ionic Currents in Development, R. Nuccitelli, ed. (springer.com)
  • T. Matthes and H. Gruler, Analysis of cell locomotion. (springer.com)
  • chemotactic
  • S. H. Zigmond, Ability of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes to orient in Gradients of Chemotactic Factors, J. Cell Biol. (springer.com)
  • occurs
  • DNA transfer between prokaryotic cells occurs in bacteria and archaea, although it has been mainly studied in bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Generally, the process occurs whereby the cell, or organism, moves along a surface in the general direction of its long axis. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have developed an experimental laboratory test that accurately clocks the "speed" of human brain tumor cell movement along a small glass "track. (eurekalert.org)
  • Penn and NIH researchers have demonstrated a never-before characterized type of cell movement. (eurekalert.org)
  • For decades, researchers have used petri dishes to study cell movement. (eurekalert.org)
  • Because this only happened to cells moving in the three-dimensional cell-created matrix and not cells moving in other substrates, the researchers note that the cells must be sensing their physical environment to determine what type of movement to use. (eurekalert.org)
  • With further study, the researchers determined that the neurons method of movement was similar to that of an amoeba: they extend their bodies in the direction they want to move and retract them from the opposite side. (innovations-report.com)
  • Biol
  • S. E. Malawista and A. de Boisfleury-Chevance, The cytokineplast: purified, stable and functional motile machinery from human blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes, J. Cell Biol. (springer.com)
  • J. Cell Biol. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signals
  • Dr Morgan explains: "When we changed the way Syndecan-4 senses the environment outside the cell, we were able to alter the way that it transmits signals into the cell and control integrin recycling. (nanowerk.com)
  • All cells in the epiblast can respond to signals from the marginal zone, but once a given region is induced by these signals and undergoes streak formation, the remaining cells in the epiblast are no longer responsive to these inductive signals and prevent the formation of another streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • adhesion
  • Another suggests the presence of energized nano-machinery or large macromolecular assemblies located on the bacterium's cell body, while yet another utilize "focal adhesion complexes" and "treadmilling" of surface adhesins distributed along the cell body. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • In mice, this structure is known as the Anterior Visceral Endoderm (AVE). The formation of the primitive streak in the blastocyst involves the coordinated movement and re-arrangement of cells in the epiblast. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists
  • To see if their speed test had the potential to predict which brain tumors were the most aggressive, the scientists grew cells from 14 patient glioblastomas in PDGF, then placed them on the racetracks. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scientists studying these migrations didn t know how cells determined where to go. (innovations-report.com)
  • mitosis
  • In the 1970s, research on the mitosis of polynucleated cells was done. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mitosis in multinucleate cells can occur either in a coordinated, synchronous manner where all nuclei divide simultaneously or asynchronously where individual nuclei divide independently in time and space. (wikipedia.org)
  • developmental
  • Their findings have been published in the journal Developmental Cell ( 'Syndecan-4 Phosphorylation Is a Control Point for Integrin Recycling' ). (nanowerk.com)
  • Elizabeth Dexter "Betty" Hay (April 2, 1927 - August 20, 2007) was an American cell and developmental biologist. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through this research, Betty came to the final conclusion that the differentiated somatic cells of the amphibian limb preserved enough developmental strength to fully regenerate a perfect limb. (wikipedia.org)
  • Developmental Cell, 27(6), 672-680. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myosin
  • Lastly, based on genetic interactions between dInR , the polarity determinant, dPAR-1 and a regulatory subunit of Drosophila Myosin , ( Spaghetti squash ) we propose that Insulin signalling likely influences dPAR-1 activity to engineer border cell detachment and subsequent movement via Drosophila Myosin. (biologists.org)
  • intercalation
  • Comparisons of epiboly in amniotes, teleosts and X. laevis show that the key movement of epiboly in the fish and frog is radial intercalation while in amniotes it would appear to be cell division in the plane of the epithelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • membranes
  • In addition, the presence of Exo70 in cells led to the creation of protrusions on the membranes. (upenn.edu)
  • metastasis
  • For instance, when cancer cells acquire the ability to move all around the body (metastasis), tumors become the most dangerous. (azonano.com)
  • Our findings highlight an important role of miR-124 in the regulation of invasion and metastasis by breast cancer cells and suggest a potential application for miR-124 in breast cancer treatment. (labome.org)
  • In conclusion, silencing Oct4 promotes invasion and metastasis in breast cancer cells by inducing EMT. (labome.org)
  • formation
  • The Polonaise Movement is key for the formation of the primitive streak. (wikipedia.org)
  • It blocks adenosine-induced apoptotic body formation without affecting activation of endogenous ADP-ribosylation in leukemia HL-60 cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also affects the appearance of young glands in cells and new gland formation in other cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • jail cell
  • we took our stand outside the country music rules, its set ways, locking the door on its own jail cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Little was born into humble circumstances in Seattle, the son of truck driver Sterling Little, who died in August 1947 after hanging himself in a jail cell in the King County Courthouse where he was being held on a burglary charge. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood vessels
  • The PDL contains nerve fibers (receptors) blood vessels and mesenchymal cells that are undifferentiated, or partly differentiated, cells that act as adult stem cells, and can produce osteoblasts, osteoclasts and fibroblasts. (blogspot.com)
  • Individuals with sickle cell anemia, compressed blood vessels, ventricular tachycardia, plaque buildup in the arteries, blood clots, extremely low blood pressure as a result of heart attack, and congenital heart defects have a higher predisposition to brain ischemia in comparison their healthy counterparts. (wikipedia.org)
  • components
  • Components and strategies Cell lifestyle MCF-7 cells had been grown up in DMEM moderate filled with 10% fetal leg serum and 1% penicillin/streptomycin serum as defined (9). (cancercurehere.com)
  • Metabolism is usually divided into two categories: catabolism, the breaking down of organic matter for example, the breaking down of glucose to pyruvate, by cellular respiration, and anabolism, the building up of components of cells such as proteins and nucleic acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • However, the difference is not obvious because proximal ballismic movements may exist along with distal chorea, symptoms may be intermittent in more severe cases, and in many patients a change of ballismus to chorea can be seen readily or in response to treatment. (healthgala.info)
  • The main symptoms involve impairments in vision, body movement, and speaking. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • It has a positive effect on the bowel movement, which may be utilised in treatments of many diseases that lead to disruption of intestinal wall, and thus increase the risk of developing a more serious disease . (penoxal.com)
  • different
  • Outcomes had been gathered from 3 different batches of MCF-7 cells. (cancercurehere.com)
  • Ultimately, I think the outlaw movement or publicity or gimmick or whatever you want to call it did a great thing for country music as a whole, because it opened the way for different styles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The word metabolism can also refer to the sum of all chemical reactions that occur in living organisms, including digestion and the transport of substances into and between different cells, in which case the set of reactions within the cells is called intermediary metabolism or intermediate metabolism. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • Hemibalism is a form of chorea characterized by rigorous and frequent movements of the limbs on one side of the body. (healthgala.info)
  • MSA is characterized by a combination of the following, which can be present in any combination: autonomic dysfunction parkinsonism (muscle rigidity +/ tremor and slow movement) ataxia (Poor coordination / unsteady walking) A variant with combined features of MSA and Lewy body dementia may also exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA), also known as Shy-Drager syndrome, is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by tremors, slow movement, muscle rigidity, and postural instability (collectively known as parkinsonism) due to dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system, and ataxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • surface
  • Ultralight signals (less than 1 sec and less than 1 kg) are detected by mechanoreceptors on the surface of the periodontal and periosteal cells. (blogspot.com)
  • system
  • The mastoid air cell system is in functional and anatomic continuity with the middle ear, and inflammation of the middle ear is often associated with mastoid fluid or mucosal inflammation. (neurologyadvisor.com)
  • Ca2+ entrance via turned on TRPC was improved when PUFA had been absent, recommending a double-gating system for Danshensu TRPC which may be involved with MCF breasts cancer tumor cell proliferation and invasion. (cancercurehere.com)
  • energy
  • Amino acids also contribute to cellular energy metabolism by providing a carbon source for entry into the citric acid cycle (tricarboxylic acid cycle), especially when a primary source of energy, such as glucose, is scarce, or when cells undergo metabolic stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • light
  • Photoelectric cells in a spectrophotometer device worn on the forehead measure the amount of each wavelength of light reflected by cerebral blood flow in the activated cortical tissue and send the data to a computer, which then calculates the ratio of red to infrared light and translates it into a visual signal of corresponding to oxygenation level on a graphical interface the patient can see. (wikipedia.org)
  • focus
  • Additionally, our outcomes also claim that TRPC3 shows up as a fresh mediator of breasts cancer tumor cell migration/invasion and represents a potential focus on for a fresh course of anticancer agent. (cancercurehere.com)
  • diverse
  • BMP (Bone morphogenetic protein) cell signaling plays a key role in diverse aspects of cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. (wikipedia.org)