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  • centrosomes
  • It aims to reproduce the results of the Nature Cell Biology Paper Subdiffraction imaging of centrosomes reveals higher-order organizational features of pericentriolar material from the same data set but with a different analysis method. (biii.eu)
  • CDC14A encodes a dual-specificity phosphatase implicated in cell cycle control and also interacts with interphase centrosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • germ cells
  • In 1873, August Weismann postulated the equivalence of the maternal and paternal germ cells for heredity. (wikipedia.org)
  • speculated that PSP1, which is highly concentrated in the testis, may regulate the germ cells' early mRNA processing and assist in chromatin remodeling and nuclear shaping during spermatogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • cleavage furrow
  • Animal cells form an actin-myosin contractile ring within the equatorial region of the cell membrane that constricts to form the cleavage furrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cleavage furrow in animal cells and the phragmoplast in plant cells are complex structures made up of microtubules and microfilaments that aide in the final separation of the cells into two identical daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cleavage furrow mechanism in animal cells is a complex network of actin and myosin filaments, Golgi vesicles and Calcium dependent channels enabling the cell to break apart, reseal and form new daughter cells with complete membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane
  • a structure known as a cell plate forms midway between the divided nuclei, which gradually develops into a separating membrane. (prezi.com)
  • A nuclear membrane, also known as the nuclear envelope, is the lipid bilayer membrane which surrounds the genetic material and nucleolus in eukaryotic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In eukaryotes, such as yeast, which undergo closed mitosis, the nuclear membrane stays intact during cell division. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adaptive function of the nuclear membrane may have been to serve as a barrier to protect the genome from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the cells' pre-mitochondria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular respiration - The metabolic reactions and processes that take place in a cell or across the cell membrane to convert biochemical energy from fuel molecules into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and then release the cell's waste products. (wikipedia.org)
  • The lipid bilayer is a critical component of the cell membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • checkpoint
  • In particular, the G2 checkpoint arrests cells in G2 in response to DNA damage through inhibitory regulation of CDK1. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology
  • The Journal of Cell Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nature Cell Biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell biology: thanks for the memory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell biology can be described as all of the following: Branch of science - A systematic enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the universe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell biology - (formerly cytology) The study of cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular differentiation - A concept in developmental biology whereby less specialized cells become a more specialized cell type in multicellular organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • eukaryotes
  • Non-proliferative (non-dividing) cells in multicellular eukaryotes generally enter the quiescent G0 state from G1 and may remain quiescent for long periods of time, possibly indefinitely (as is often the case for neurons). (wikipedia.org)
  • replication
  • Question: Since DNA replication is being done in the cell cycle immediately following formation of the cell, how could there be any degradation of DNA or RNA? (biology-online.org)
  • DNA replication immediately following formation of the cell is for cells that are only for reproducing themselves (such as stem cells and immune cells) when it is called for in the organism. (biology-online.org)
  • If the cell has any function in the organism, it will only proceed onto DNA replication when it is needed to be replicated. (biology-online.org)
  • The cell cycle or cell-division cycle is the series of events that take place in a cell leading to its division and duplication of its DNA (DNA replication) to produce two daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The B period extends from the end of cell division to the beginning of DNA replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • The D period refers to the stage between the end of DNA replication and the splitting of the bacterial cell into two daughter cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first members of the IAPs identified were from the baculovirus IAPs, Cp-IAP and Op-IAP, which bind to and inhibit caspases as a mechanism that contributes to its efficient infection and replication cycle in the host. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells then proceed to a second division without an intervening round of DNA replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer
  • These data suggest survivin might provide a new target for cancer therapy that would discriminate between transformed and normal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • apoptosis
  • it is often a biochemical alternative to the self-destruction of such a damaged cell by apoptosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In programmed cell death, interphase is followed or preempted by apoptosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • The survivin protein functions to inhibit caspase activation, thereby leading to negative regulation of apoptosis or programmed cell death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Apoptosis, the process of programmed cell death, involves complex signaling pathways and cascades of molecular events. (wikipedia.org)
  • In adult organisms, apoptosis is needed to maintain differentiated tissue by striking the balance between proliferation and cell death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian cells have two main pathways that lead to apoptosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • In female animals, three of the four meiotic products are typically eliminated by extrusion into polar bodies, and only one cell develops to produce an ovum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically tubular, multinucleated, and with a chitinous cell wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • nuclei
  • Then two nuclei form around the chromatids at the two ends of the cell. (goodrichscience.com)
  • Unlike mammalian red blood cells, those of other vertebrates still contain nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • Franz Meyen was a strong opponent of this view, having already described cells multiplying by division and believing that many cells would have no nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this study, a nuclear enriched non-coding RNA (termed CTNRNA) was identified that specifically localised to paraspeckles in the nuclei of several cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • It is known that intracellular proteases called caspases degrade the cellular contents of the cell by proteolysis upon activation of the death pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a cell switches state from one cell type to another, it undergoes cellular differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Interphase (also known as ' interkinesis ') is the period in which the cell is not dividing. (ivyroses.com)
  • In spite of extensive and detailed analyses in the steps and mechanisms regarding the syntheses and assembly of the ribosome, little is known as to the spatial and temporal dynamics of these processes in living cells. (rupress.org)
  • To ensure the proper division of the cell, there are control mechanisms known as cell cycle checkpoints. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell - The structural and functional unit of all known living organisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is the smallest unit of an organism that is classified as living, and also known as the building block of life.Etymology of "cell" - Comes from the Latin cellula, meaning, a small room. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • The cell-division cycle is a vital process by which a single-celled fertilized egg develops into a mature organism, as well as the process by which hair, skin, blood cells, and some internal organs are renewed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The duration of time spent in interphase and in each stage of interphase is variable and depends on both the type of cell and the species of organism it belongs to. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vital functions of an organism occur within cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissues - A collection of interconnected cells that perform a similar function within an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • membranes
  • Eukaryote - Organisms whose cells are organized into complex structures enclosed within membranes, including plants, animals, fungi, and protists. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Through infection, conversion, and assimilation of humans and other organisms, the cells eventually aggregate most of the biosphere of North America into a region seven thousand kilometers wide. (wikipedia.org)