Loading...
  • Tissue Culture
  • In practice, the term "cell culture" now refers to the culturing of cells derived from multicellular eukaryotes, especially animal cells, in contrast with other types of culture that also grow cells, such as plant tissue culture, fungal culture, and microbiological culture (of microbes). (wikipedia.org)
  • The historical development and methods of cell culture are closely interrelated to those of tissue culture and organ culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1885, Wilhelm Roux removed a portion of the medullary plate of an embryonic chicken and maintained it in a warm saline solution for several days, establishing the principle of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ross Granville Harrison, working at Johns Hopkins Medical School and then at Yale University, published results of his experiments from 1907 to 1910, establishing the methodology of tissue culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, this couple's greatest impact on embryology and cell biology in the twentieth century was teaching later generations of biologists the basic factors involved in tissue culture based on what they had learned from their research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through the tissue culture techniques the Lewises had developed, these studies showed that infections and diseases were cellular phenomena in that infection was observed in an isolated system but the events occurred in a way that would be observed in an organism as a whole. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plowright received the 1999 World Food Prize for his development of tissue culture rinderpest vaccine (TCRV), the key element in the quest to eliminate rinderpest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike its predecessors, tissue culture rinderpest vaccine (TCRV) could be used safely in all types of cattle, it could be produced very economically and conferred lifelong immunity. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • The recent trend to standa- ization of conditions and the existence of commercial ent- prises with adequate funds and specializing in the needs of scientists were responsible for the tremendous proliferation of cell culture techniques in all fields of research in the last 20 years. (springer.com)
  • In addition to basic techniques, a wide range of specialised practical protocols covering the following areas are included: cell proliferation and death, in-vitro models for cell differentiation, in-vitro models for toxicology and pharmacology, industrial application of animal cell culture, genetic manipulation and analysis of human and animal cells in culture. (slugbooks.com)
  • Three days National workshop entitled 'Hands on Training on Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Proliferation assays and Gene expression analysis by RT-PCR, 14-16 July, 2016', sponsored by Department of Biotechnology, New Delhi and JSS University, Mysuru, organized by Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Department of Pharmacology, JSS College of Pharmacy, Ooty in collaboration with Qiagen India Pvt. (pharmdinfo.com)
  • In their combined efforts, the Lewises found that cell proliferation with their media selection and methods seemed only to occur in tissues common to all organs, such as connective tissue and blood vessel endothelium. (wikipedia.org)
  • This can be explained in part by their intrinsically low telomerase activity, eradicating the risk of tumorigenesis through unbridled cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Biophysical properties of the 3D cells regulate the cells growth, drug diffusion dynamics and gene expressions. (springer.com)
  • Combining gene editing and stem-cell induction improves efficiency of functional genetic analyses. (the-scientist.com)
  • An established or immortalized cell line has acquired the ability to proliferate indefinitely either through random mutation or deliberate modification, such as artificial expression of the telomerase gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • An expression vector, otherwise known as an expression construct, is usually a plasmid or virus designed for gene expression in cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The vector is used to introduce a specific gene into a target cell, and can commandeer the cell's mechanism for protein synthesis to produce the protein encoded by the gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chromosome 12 of Vero cells has a homozygous ~9-Mb deletion, causing the loss of the type I interferon gene cluster and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B in the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research strains transfected with viral genes: Vero F6 is a cell transfected with the gene encoding HHV-1 entry protein glycoprotein-H (gH). (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluripotent stem cells can be directly obtained from normal human mesenchymal tissues without using artificial manipulations such as gene introduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • These gene expression pattern and level may explain why Muse cells are pluripotent but without tumorigenic activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the method a suspension of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is introduced into a plant leaf by direct injection or by vacuum infiltration, or brought into association with plant cells immobilised on a porous support (plant cell packs), whereafter the bacteria transfer the desired gene into the plant cells via transfer of T-DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once inside the leaf the Agrobacterium remains in the intercellular space and transfers the gene of interest as part of the Ti plasmid-derived T-DNA in high copy numbers into the plant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The gene is then transiently expressed through RNA synthesis from appropriate promoter sequences in all transfected cells (no selection for stable integration is performed). (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to defend itself against viruses and other pathogens that introduce foreign nucleic acids into their cells,plants have developed a system of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) where small interfering RNAs are produced from double-stranded RNA in order to create a sequence specific degradation pathway that efficiently silence non-native genes. (wikipedia.org)
  • viability
  • Note that cell viability should be in excess of 90% (on cell count) to achieve good recovery after freezing. (edu.au)
  • For the majority of isolated primary cells, they undergo the process of senescence and stop dividing after a certain number of population doublings while generally retaining their viability (described as the Hayflick limit). (wikipedia.org)
  • embryonic
  • Obermüller2017, author={Obermüller, Jakob}, title={Mimicking embryonic interactions with engineered cell-culturing techniques}, abstract={Compaction of the mouse embryo is triggered by the formation of filopodia by some of the blastomeres. (chalmers.se)
  • The National Institutes of Health (NIH) invites applications for grants to develop, conduct, evaluate, and disseminate short-term courses on laboratory research techniques for human embryonic stem cell lines. (bmj.com)
  • The courses should include hands-on experience to improve the knowledge and skills of biomedical researchers to maintain, characterize, and use human embryonic stem cells in basic research studies and be made available to investigators in research areas of interest to all of the institutes and centers of the NIH. (bmj.com)
  • However, she also made the distinction that the cells do not become more embryonic like Champy and others claimed, but instead lose their differentiated appearance as a tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Can be isolated as cells positive for SSEA-3, a well known human embryonic stem cell marker. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitro
  • Recent innovations in human cell culture exposure and test systems has allowed the development ofin vitro assay systems that are predictive, representative and suitable for toxicity screening of a diverse range of chemicals including airborne materials and nanomaterials (NMs). (edu.au)
  • Innovative in vitro exposure techniques that have been developed to provide direct exposure of human lung cells to inhaled materials and nanomaterials will be discussed. (edu.au)
  • Margaret Adaline Reed Lewis (1881-1970) was an American cell biologist and embryologist who made contributions to cancer research and cell culture techniques, and was likely the first person to successfully grow mammalian tissue in vitro. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem-cell
  • A muse cell (multi-lineage differentiating stress enduring cell) is a endogenous non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comprise ~0.03% of bone marrow transplantation and several % of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are also positive for general mesenchymal stem cell markers such as CD105, CD90 and CD29. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, Muse cells are double positive for pluripotent and mesenchymal stem cell markers. (wikipedia.org)
  • This indicates that Muse cells do not belong to previously investigated stem cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • contamination
  • Bacteria/Fungi - contamination of culture usually changes colour of medium + turbidity. (edu.au)
  • The issue of cell line misidentification and cross contamination has been recognized as a significant problem in recent years, and solutions are addressed here. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • One complication of these blood-derived ingredients is the potential for contamination of the culture with viruses or prions, particularly in medical biotechnology applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • vivo
  • Most cells will survive removal from the natural mic- environment of their in vivo tissue and placement into a sterile culture dish under optimal conditions. (springer.com)
  • Antoni D, Burckel H, Josset E, Noel G (2015) Three-dimensional cell culture: a breakthrough in vivo. (springer.com)
  • Muse cells do not undergo teratoma formation when transplanted into a host environment in vivo. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • The cells also hold valuable genetic information that could lead doctors to more informed treatment decisions and even tailor-made therapies for individual patients. (nanowerk.com)
  • populations
  • These populations were to be co-cultured to allow filopodial contact to be established between them, after which the contact-receiving cells were to be isolated. (chalmers.se)
  • Using Painter's technique they studied the polytene chromosomes and discovered that the wild populations were polymorphic for chromosomal inversions. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Belgium, Gent: University of Gent, 2000, 362 Practical Cell future opinions are in all years of theoretical bacteria. (freelanceadcopy.com)
  • This can result in nearly all of the cells in any given leaf being in contact with the bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • examine
  • They also envision larger studies that test more treatments on cultured cells and examine the correlation between the ability to grow cancer cells from individual patients and those patients long-term outcomes. (nanowerk.com)
  • 2000
  • Texas A&M University cloned a Black Angus bull named 86 Squared in 2000, after cells from his donor, Bull 86, had been frozen for 15 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fungi
  • The other collections are the National Collection of Type Cultures (NCTC), the National Collection of Pathogenic Viruses (NCPV) and the National Collection of Pathogenic Fungi (NCPF). (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • structures
  • Cell growth, structural organization, morphology and surface structures for 3D microtissues cultured using both techniques appeared to be different and might be suitable for different applications. (springer.com)
  • Since the Lewises main interest was microscopic cell structures, their objective was to create optically clear media, which led to the creation of the Locke-Lewis solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • substrate
  • Discher D, Janmey P, Y-l Wang (2005) Tissue cells feel and respond to the stiffness of their substrate. (springer.com)
  • Collectively, these results show that the underlying mechanisms behind filopodia-formation may vary, depending on cell-type and environmental parameters such as substrate composition. (chalmers.se)
  • Human
  • Researchers are looking at actin polymerization and calcium uptake in human cells to study mitochondrial division. (the-scientist.com)
  • Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death. (the-scientist.com)
  • Muse cells are identified as cells positive for SSEA-3+, a well-known marker for undifferentiated human ES cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • showed that human dermal fibroblast-derived Muse cells were efficiently differentiated into melanin-producing functional melanocytes by a cocktail of cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • This was shown in human Muse cells infused into animal models with fulminant hepatitis, partial hepatectomy, muscle degeneration, skin injury, stroke and spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology
  • Its applications are wide-ranging including microelectronics, surface chemistry and cell biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • Nanowerk News ) In a development that could lead to a deeper understanding of cancer and better early-stage treatment of the disease, University of Michigan researchers have devised a reliable way to grow a certain type of cancer cells from patients outside the body for study. (nanowerk.com)
  • The next step for the researchers is to fine-tune the design of the chip device, optimizing its ability to both capture cells and grow new ones. (nanowerk.com)
  • In 2001 researchers at Advanced Cell Technology in Worcester, Massachusetts, United States, reported that 24 successfully cloned Holsteins had been monitored from birth to the age of four. (wikipedia.org)
  • Growth
  • After the cancer cells were captured on the chip, the team pumped in a mixture of collagen and Matrigel growth medium. (nanowerk.com)
  • In both techniques, cells remodeled into microtissues via different growth phases and showed good integrity of cells in field-emission scanning microscopy (FE-SEM). (springer.com)
  • Personnel are required to optimise equipment set-up, media and growth techniques. (edu.au)
  • however, only the white cells are capable of growth in culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alternatively, pieces of tissue can be placed in growth media, and the cells that grow out are available for culture. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aside from temperature and gas mixture, the most commonly varied factor in culture systems is the cell growth medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loeb became interested in blood coagulation and the growth properties of malignant cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Javier Orozco proposed using these techniques leading to cell growth in textile matrices which will provide the necessary mechanical strength. (wikipedia.org)
  • genome
  • From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year's best new products shine on many levels. (the-scientist.com)
  • The whole genome sequence of a Vero cell line was determined by Japanese investigators in 2014. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genome analysis indicated that the Vero cell lineage is derived from a female Chlorocebus sabaeus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurons
  • We have developed a reliable protocol for the serum-free dissociation and culture of spiral ganglion neurons from adult mice, an important animal model for patients with post-lingual hearing loss. (illinois.edu)