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  • lysosomal
  • The present study, employing cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells and murine macrophage-like cells, explores the protective effects by iron binding agents upon H 2 0 2 and gamma radiation-induced lysosomal damage and cell death. (diva-portal.org)
  • On a molar basis α-lipoic acid-plus was 4,000 to 5,000 times more effective than desferrioxamine to prevent lysosomal rupture and cell death induced by H 2 0 2 or gamma radiation. (diva-portal.org)
  • cardiac
  • Somatic death is characterized by the discontinuance of cardiac activity and respiration, and eventually leads to the death of all body cells from lack of oxygen, although for approximately six minutes after somatic death-a period referred to as clinical death-a person whose vital organs have not been damaged may be revived. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • cause of de
  • The units of study were person-years, each linked to the subject's age, sex, and cause of death (if any) for the specific year. (springer.com)
  • Data were obtained from the Swedish Medical Birth Register, the Swedish Birth Defects Register, and the National Cause of Death Register. (diva-portal.org)
  • The main cause of death was pneumonia. (diva-portal.org)
  • Dementia was not reported in any subjects with DS before 40 years of age, but was a main or contributing cause of death in 30% of the older subjects. (diva-portal.org)
  • Except for childhood leukemia, cancer as a cause of death was rare in all age groups. (diva-portal.org)
  • cancer
  • Death from cancer is rare in DS, but death from dementia is common. (diva-portal.org)
  • A trial organized in Britain and reported in a recent edition of the Lancet tried to answer the question of whether annual screening of women between the ages of 50 and 70 by one of two different methods (blood test and ultrasound) would result in a reduced death rate from ovarian cancer. (pjmedia.com)
  • Sensitizing cancer cells to TRAIL-induced death by micellar delivery of mitoxantrone. (semanticscholar.org)
  • The risk of breast cancer death after a primary ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is less than 2 % after 10 years. (diva-portal.org)
  • Here patient and tumour related risk factors for breast cancer death in women with a pure primary DCIS were studied. (diva-portal.org)
  • Multifocality and tumour size over 25mm (OR 2.6 (1.6 to 4.2)), positive or uncertain margin status (OR 2.8 (1.6 to 4.9)) and detection outside screening (OR 2.1 (1.2 to 3.9)) increased the risk of breast cancer death in univariate analysis, when adjusted for age and year of diagnosis. (diva-portal.org)
  • In the present study, large tumours and positive or uncertain margin status were significant risk factors for later breast cancer death after a primary DCIS. (diva-portal.org)
  • rates
  • A paper in a recent edition of the British Medical Journal compares the death rates of primary care patients who were prescribed diazepam-like medicines and hypnotics with those who never were prescribed them more than once (they excluded patients who had been prescribed them only once because it was possible that they had never taken them, which was unlikely if they were prescribed them twice). (pjmedia.com)
  • patients
  • In 56 patients death was preceded by an invasive ipsilateral recurrence and in 3 patients by a recurrent ipsilateral DCIS. (diva-portal.org)
  • often
  • However, it has long been known that diazepam and other similar drugs cause falls in the elderly, and such falls are often the precursor of death. (pjmedia.com)
  • body
  • The body relaxes after death and feces comes out as well as urine. (allnurses.com)
  • These include rigor mortis rigor mortis , rigidity of the body that occurs after death. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The onset may vary from about 10 min to several hours or more after death, depending on the condition of the body at death and on factors in the atmosphere, particularly temperature. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • livor mortis (discoloration of the body due to settling of blood), algor mortis (cooling of the body), autolysis (breakdown of tissue by enzymes liberated by that tissue after death), and putrefaction (invasion of the body by organisms from the gastrointestinal tract). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The current definition is that of a 1981 U.S. presidential commission, which recommended that death be defined as "irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem," the brain stem being that part of the brain that controls breathing and other basic body functions. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • past
  • During the past few decades age at death for individuals with Down syndrome (DS) has increased dramatically. (diva-portal.org)
  • legal
  • Brain death, which is now a legal condition in most states for declared death, requires that the following be absent for at least 12 hours: behavioral or reflex motor functions above the neck, including pupillary reflexes to testing jaw reflex, gag reflex, response to noxious stimuli, and any spontaneous respiratory movement. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • whites
  • For example, African Americans/Blacks, Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and underserved Whites are more likely than the general population to have higher incidence and death statistics for certain types of cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • Although cancer deaths have declined for both Whites and African Americans/Blacks living in the United States, African Americans/Blacks continue to suffer the greatest burden for each of the most common types of cancer. (cancer.gov)
  • The paper goes on to report that since the Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, nationwide eight whites have been executed for killing blacks while 123 blacks have been put to death for killing whites. (slate.com)
  • 1995
  • A cohort of 1981 women not accompanied by dependent children who used homeless shelters in Toronto in 1995 was observed for death over a mean of 2.6 years. (cmaj.ca)
  • Sudden
  • In addition, the nicotine in smokeless tobacco may increase the risk for sudden death from a condition where the heart does not beat properly (ventricular arrhythmias). (cdc.gov)
  • Efforts
  • Efforts to reduce deaths of homeless women should focus on those under age 45. (cmaj.ca)
  • We are working together on a special study to better understand the context of opioid-related deaths, as well as initiatives to advance harm reduction approaches and support prevention efforts through linkages with local public health, municipal and public safety officials. (canada.ca)
  • The provinces, territories and federal government are committed to working together through the Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses to advance efforts to reduce opioid-related deaths and harms. (canada.ca)
  • Cardiopulmonary criteria for death are met when a physician determines that efforts to restart a stopped heart during cardiac arrest are futile, or that no attempt should be made to restart a stopped heart, such as when there is a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • Provisional data for 2017 from the CDC show no signs of the epidemic abating, with an estimate of more than 66,000 overdose deaths for the year. (cnn.com)
  • The number of deaths for both the first and second quarters of 2017 is expected to increase as additional data become available. (canada.ca)
  • Exposure
  • Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer. (wiktionary.org)
  • data
  • OMNS, January 19, 2010) There was not even one death caused by a dietary supplement in 2008, according to the most recent information collected by the U.S. National Poison Data System. (orthomolecular.org)
  • While epidemiological data are crucial to understanding and addressing the opioid crisis, we must not forget the cherished human life behind each death in today's release. (canada.ca)
  • We are acutely aware of the urgent need to work collaboratively to reduce opioid-related deaths and prevent future tragedies like those represented in the data released today. (canada.ca)
  • heart
  • One in 9 deaths in 2009 included heart failure as contributing cause. (cdc.gov)
  • Brain death is determined by there being no signs of brain function during neurological examination of a person with a beating heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike cardiopulmonary death which sometimes involves a decision not to resuscitate the heart, brain death is a determination that the brain biologically cannot be resuscitated. (wikipedia.org)
  • report
  • Upon issuance of a local (foreign) death certificate, the nearest embassy or consulate may prepare a Consular Report of the Death of an American Abroad. (state.gov)
  • For more information on the Consular Report of the Death of an American Abroad, and other services that a consular officer can help you with when a loved one passes away overseas, see the links below. (state.gov)
  • cause
  • Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • risk
  • In studies from a total of 7 cities, the risk of death among homeless women was greater than that among women in the general population by a factor of 4.6 to 31.2 in the younger age group and 1.0 to 2.0 in the older age group. (cmaj.ca)
  • Categories
  • In the United States , each state has laws for determining these two categories of death that are modeled after the Uniform Determination of Death Act . (wikipedia.org)
  • crime
  • Death ,'" quoted Warwick, with whose mood the undertaker's remarks were in tune, "'is the penalty that all must pay for the crime of living. (wiktionary.org)
  • family
  • Most of those deaths involved opioids, a family of painkillers including illicit heroin and fentanyl as well as legally prescribed medications such as oxycodone and hydrocodone. (cnn.com)
  • The death of my grandmother saddened the whole family. (wiktionary.org)
  • In addition, this issue also includes several reviews on tangential topics, such as viral hijacking of host caspases, metacaspase functions, non-lethal functions of BCL-2 family proteins, and alternative, caspase-independent developmental cell death pathways. (nature.com)
  • certificate
  • When a death has been registered in a civil registry , a death certificate may be issued. (wikipedia.org)
  • Such death certificate may be required in a number of legal situations, such as applying for probate , claiming some benefits or making an insurance claim, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • focus
  • Access the latest web focus which highlights some of the latest research from China covered by the three journals in the Cell Death portfolio. (nature.com)
  • half
  • About half of these deaths could be prevented, and half the injuries reduced or eliminated, through simple changes in care that doctors, hospitals and medical experts have known about for years. (usatoday.com)
  • country
  • A U.S. consular officer overseas has statutory responsibility for the personal estate of a U.S. citizen who dies abroad if the deceased has no legal representative or next-of-kin in the country where the death occurred, subject to local law. (state.gov)
  • years
  • For the next twenty years his friends met on the anniversary of his death to visit his grave and talk about him fondly. (angelfire.com)
  • cases
  • In most cases, a doctor's declaration of death (variously called) or the identification of a corpse is a legal requirement for such recognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain death determinations are made in cases where breathing is supported by machines . (wikipedia.org)
  • In some cases, a legal declaration of death is fraudulent. (wikipedia.org)