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  • calves
  • In cattle, the infection causes spontaneous abortions, calf deaths, calves with low birth weights and reduced milk production. (chicagotribune.com)
  • In a study among Holstein calves published in the scientific journal BMC Genetics they have discovered a hitherto undescribed disease among animals - a facial deformation they have chosen to call Facial Dysplasia Syndrome. (eurekalert.org)
  • The researchers have discovered the genetic mutation that is the cause of the disease among calves and traced it back to one particular breeding bull. (eurekalert.org)
  • The bull has now been put down to prevent further cases of the disease among new-born calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • After having received information from veterinarians of calves with facial deformations, Jørgen Agerholm went looking for more cases in his network of cattle veterinarians, including on Facebook. (eurekalert.org)
  • This gene was sequenced in the calves' genome, and the researchers were then able to determine that a mutation in this gene had caused the disease among the calves. (eurekalert.org)
  • This means that the calves developed the deformation when the mutation was passed on from either the mother or father and not from both the mother and the father, which is the case with many hereditary diseases. (eurekalert.org)
  • Our aim was always to lower the number of sick and dead calves, as some hereditary diseases are very painful and invalidating. (eurekalert.org)
  • The disease, which occurs in California's coastal mountains and the foothill regions of California, Southern Oregon and Northern Nevada, annually results in the death of an estimated 45,000 to 90,000 unborn calves. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • One of the five most economically important cattle diseases in the industry, coccidiosis is a costly parasitic disease, primarily in young calves. (beefmagazine.com)
  • eradicate
  • Today's decision to eradicate is driven by the government's desire to protect the national herd from the disease and protect the base of our economy - the farming sector," Ardern said in a statement. (producer.com)
  • There is a Cooperative State Federal Brucellosis program in the United States to eradicate the disease from this country. (vt.edu)
  • bovine
  • The research team is using state-of-the-art genome science and computer modeling to detect, confirm and locate harmful genes that cause bovine respiratory disease. (cattletoday.com)
  • Accurate identification of all genes in the genomes of the three pathogens will advance the research needed to render the pathogens nonvirulent and develop more effective vaccines to protect against bovine respiratory disease, she added.Once the MSU investigators sequenced the genomes, they used computer algorithms to predict where genes are located. (cattletoday.com)
  • In fact, the direct cost of treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in feedlot cattle is substantial at $23.60/case. (beefmagazine.com)
  • respiratory disease
  • Its resistance to many common antibiotics severely limits treatment options and often presents itself as respiratory disease, throwing off track veterinarians trained to recognize diarrhea as salmonella's telltale sign. (syracuse.com)
  • rinderpest
  • 25 June 2011, Rome - Flanked by Presidents, Vice-Presidents, Ministers and other international dignitaries, FAO Director-General Jacques Diouf today unveiled a commemorative plaque to celebrate global freedom from rinderpest, or cattle plague, one of history's deadliest animal diseases and a long-time threat to human livelihoods and food security. (fao.org)
  • The disease has not been seen in Europe since the early 1900s, but rinderpest remained a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia until the late 1990s. (fwi.co.uk)
  • When rinderpest was introduced into sub-Saharan Africa at the end of the 19th century it killed off 80-90% of all cattle in the region. (fwi.co.uk)
  • So far, rinderpest is only the second viral disease after smallpox to have been successfully wiped off the face of the Earth. (iaea.org)
  • Walter Plowright, the British veterinarian often called one of the 'heroes of the 20th century' because of the massive increase in meat and dairy products resulting from his invention of a vaccine that has almost totally eliminated the cattle disease rinderpest, died recently in London. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • Most Americans have probably never heard of rinderpest, a virus in the same family as measles that causes one of the most lethal diseases in cattle. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • livestock
  • It is one of the most serious livestock diseases with greatest impacts in pastoralist areas. (youtube.com)
  • You'll find the net's best cattle news, free livestock classified ads, free ranch listing, the latest USDA livestock market report, free ranch email, Baxter Black, thousands of links and a free newsletter just for ranchers. (cattletoday.info)
  • Josphat Nyika, a director in the ministry of Lands' Department of Livestock and Veterinary Services said he had been treating more cases of theileriosis with more than 2 000 cattle dying across the country this year alone. (co.zw)
  • As the cattle-adapted strain salmonella dublin creeps into the northeastern United States, veterinarians and farmers struggle to catch the bacteria in time to protect livestock because these bacteria often hide dormant in carrier animals, making the strain particularly hard to diagnose. (syracuse.com)
  • A vaccine for livestock is available in areas where anthrax is a common livestock disease. (vt.edu)
  • Zealand
  • The initial outbreak in July led to concerns that the disease that could affect market access for New Zealand's diary products, but led only to a brief dip in the New Zealand dollar. (reuters.com)
  • WELLINGTON, Aug 29 (Reuters) - Three more New Zealand farms have been identified as having a serious bacterial cattle disease, taking to six the total number of affected farms, the Ministry for Primary Industries said on Tuesday. (reuters.com)
  • News in July of the country's first confirmed cases briefly knocked the New Zealand dollar given the importance of the cattle industry for the economy. (independent.ie)
  • How to cite this page: 'Sheep and Cattle Disease', from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966. (teara.govt.nz)
  • The disease, which is common in many countries, was first detected in New Zealand at a farm in the South Island last July and some 37 properties have now tested positive for the illness. (producer.com)
  • farms
  • Two other nearby farms suspected of being affected by the disease were being tested and restrictions have been placed on the movement of animals to prevent any spread, the Ministry of Primary Industries said in a statement. (reuters.com)
  • It brings the total number of farms confirmed with the disease to seven. (newstalkzb.co.nz)
  • vaccine against the disease
  • In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , Benjamin Dewals of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liège in Belgium and his team report that they have discovered the gene that enables AlHV-1 infection to progress to MCF, and they have developed a vaccine against the disease. (phys.org)
  • Together they created the first truly effective vaccine against the disease. (vaccinenewsdaily.com)
  • veterinary
  • On 27 June, chief veterinary officers and other experts from around the world will meet at FAO Headquarters to discuss measures to safeguard remaining samples of virus and vaccines in laboratories, and to assess risks and response requirements in the fight against other high impact diseases. (fao.org)
  • Ithaca, NY -- A test for the cattle disease salmonella dublin that is cheaper, quicker, safer and more sensitive than traditional bacteriological tests is now available for the first time in the United States at the state Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine. (syracuse.com)
  • Scientists at the university`s College of Veterinary Medicine have completed initial testing of a new vaccine they say promises to protect cattle from brucellosis without most of the drawbacks of the vaccine currently in use. (chicagotribune.com)
  • And of course it also improves the financial situation of the cattle owners, who are able to minimise losses', explains Jørgen Agerholm, who is also Head of the Section for Veterinary Reproduction and Obstetrics. (eurekalert.org)
  • The veterinary department informed me that approximately 50 cattle have died because of babesiosis, a tick-borne disease," he said. (co.zm)
  • In my veterinary practice of more than twenty years, which has been devoted in large part to cattle, with special reference to the disease of abortion, I have found that in nearly every case of abortion, except such as were caused by a fall, a kick or other absolute violence, the germs of the disease were in both the cow and the foetus. (oldandsold.com)
  • This is a most unusual bug, a 'Ripley's Believe It or Not' bacterium, and the tick that carries it is equally bizarre," said veterinary immunologist Jeffrey Stott, who has led the effort to develop a preventive vaccine for the malady that western ranchers know all too well as "foothill abortion disease. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • Gary Zimmerman, veterinary researcher in Livingston, MT, says there are several different genera and many species of pathogenic coccidia, but only a few affect cattle. (beefmagazine.com)
  • fatal
  • Phys.org) -Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a disease that is almost always fatal in cattle. (phys.org)
  • Babesiosis is a rare, severe and sometimes fatal tick-borne disease caused by various types of Babesia, a microscopic parasite that infects red blood cells. (co.zm)
  • The clinical disease usually lasts for several weeks and is invariably progressive and fatal. (vegsoc.org)
  • producers
  • Mississippi State -- Mississippi State University researchers are developing a biological map of how three tiny pathogens cause big losses for cattle producers each year. (cattletoday.com)
  • Some producers think cattle get coccidiosis from birds, but it isn't true," Zimmerman says. (beefmagazine.com)
  • abortion
  • Before it was understood or accepted that abortion is a disease, the act of abortion or prematurely expelling the foetus, was attributed to numberless causes and conditions. (oldandsold.com)
  • But the most common theory, and one still widely accepted even by those who recognize abortion as a disease, is that the malady is caused by ergot or smut on grasses, corn and other grains. (oldandsold.com)
  • Ranchers in California and neighboring states have struggled with foothill abortion disease at least as far back as the 1940s. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • The most common clinical sign in cattle is late-term abortion, but many infected cattle do not show any clinical signs. (vt.edu)
  • Sheep
  • Cattle, sheep, and goats are at the highest risk of developing anthrax, but other farm animals, as well as wildlife and humans, can contract the disease. (vt.edu)
  • brucellosis
  • In addition, cattle vaccinated with strain 19 sometimes react to brucellosis test almost exactly as if they were actually infected with the disease. (chicagotribune.com)
  • States are designated "Brucellosis Class Free" when there are no cattle or bison infected with brucellosis for 12 consecutive months. (vt.edu)
  • herd
  • The health of a cattle herd depends on the caretaker being able to recognize disease symptoms of common ailments. (mom.me)
  • Sorting the sick cattle and isolating them from the rest of the herd can keep the remaining cattle healthy, even when several display common disease symptoms. (mom.me)
  • infections
  • Traditional bacteriological tests identified only the bacteria in sick or deceased animals, missing up to 85 percent of infections in carrier cattle. (syracuse.com)
  • All cattle have subclinical infections, which are held in check by host immunity. (beefmagazine.com)
  • calf
  • While this is the first and most common application of the term, the second, and by far the most important designation, is that of the disease which is the cause of perhaps ninety per cent of "calf slinking. (oldandsold.com)
  • Some would even carry the calf full time, but the germs of the disease would remain in the system of both the cow and the calf, causing trouble later for both. (oldandsold.com)
  • Subscribe to Cow-Calf Weekly for more cattle health information. (beefmagazine.com)
  • pigs
  • In the cases of cattle I've examined with these issues, their blood profile is eerily similar to that of pigs with fatigued-pig syndrome [FPS]. (beefmagazine.com)
  • A fact sheet from the University of Florida defines FPS as "pigs without obvious injury, trauma or disease that refuse to walk or keep up with contemporaries. (beefmagazine.com)
  • outbreak
  • The first outbreak of the disease occurred in Mashonaland Central in January. (co.zw)
  • OVER FOURTY cattle have died in Sinazongwe district in the last seven days due to the outbreak of babesiosis disease, district commissioner Protacio Mulenga has confirmed. (co.zm)
  • And the district administration in Sinazongwe has banned the crossing and selling of cattle following reports of the outbreak of the disease. (co.zm)
  • The suspected outbreak has greatly affected the livelihoods of most of our people as you know that the wealth and agricultural productivity of people is cattle. (co.zm)
  • I would also like to take this opportunity to appeal to Zambeef here in Sinazongwe to stop buying cattle from Mweemba chiefdom so that we contain the outbreak, "he said. (co.zm)
  • strain
  • The new vaccine appears to provide protection for cattle ``not statistically different`` from that provided by the current vaccine, known as strain 19, without the complications that accompany it, Adams explained. (chicagotribune.com)
  • mastitis
  • Mastitis is commonly caused by poor hygiene in cubicle houses and milking parlours, especially where cattle are forced to lie in damp and dirty conditions. (vegsoc.org)
  • pose
  • The disease is spread by close contact between animals and does not pose a food safety risk or any risk to humans. (reuters.com)
  • serious
  • Fluids running from the nose and eyes of cattle can be an indication of a more serious health problem. (mom.me)
  • commonly
  • The most commonly used clostridial vaccination in cattle is the 7-way type which protects against Clostridium chauveoi (blackleg), Clostridium septicum and Clostridium sordelli (malignant edema), Clostridium novyi (black disease), and three types of Clostridium perfringens (enterotoxemia). (cattletoday.info)
  • animals
  • Mark Bryan also says the cattle disease could be a major setback for efforts to reduce antibiotic use in farm animals. (radionz.co.nz)
  • The disease is not transmitted directly from sick animals to healthy animals by mere contact. (cattletoday.info)
  • Instead, the Pajaroello lives in the decomposing plant litter at the base of trees, shrubs and rocks, and is attracted to cattle by the carbon dioxide the animals give off. (redbluffdailynews.com)
  • New legislation states that cattle born before 1 August 1996 cannot be slaughtered for human consumption and consignment of these animals to a fresh meat slaughterhouse will be an offence. (vegsoc.org)
  • For vaccination to work, diagnostic tests had to be developed to identify the location and spread of the disease, which animals were infected, and to monitor the efficiency of the vaccination campaigns. (iaea.org)
  • Based on discussions and descriptions of the clinical signs, matched with serum chemistry from affected animals, I do think we have fatigued-cattle syndrome [FCS]. (beefmagazine.com)
  • Zoonotic diseases are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans and from humans to animals. (vt.edu)
  • species
  • Wildebeests carry asymptomatically alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), a γ-herpesvirus inducing malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) to several ruminant species (including cattle). (phys.org)
  • Fluids
  • If fluids are not given immediately, scours can cause death in younger cattle. (mom.me)
  • Transmission among cattle is through ingestion of birthing fluids and milk and in utero. (vt.edu)