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  • retina
  • If a cataract develops in this lens, some of this light may fail to reach the retina and vision becomes less clear. (news-medical.net)
  • Scientists have developed a laser-based technique that can produce a full 3D image of all the layers of the retina, allowing doctors to better diagnose and treat eye diseases such as cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and cancer. (news-medical.net)
  • Dubai, Oct 18 - A Kuwaiti eye specialist has invented a process by which cataracts can be treated with a rentiscope without going for the complex option of retina transplant. (rxpgnews.com)
  • If the lens is cloudy from a cataract, the image striking the retina will be blurry or distorted and the vision will be blurry. (medicinenet.com)
  • visual impairment
  • Using a definition of cataract that did not require visual impairment, the EDPRG estimated that in 2000 there were 20.5 million people over 40 in the United States (17.2 percent) with cataract in either eye and projected that this number would rise to 30.1 million by 2020 [ 5 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • intraocular lens
  • The treatment involves surgical cataract removal followed by placement of an intraocular lens (IOL). (everything2.com)
  • Implantation of a sulcus-supported, pseudophakic supplementary intraocular lens (IOL) can be a safe and effective method for improving vision in eyes with residual refractive error after cataract extraction, refractive lens exchange, or keratoplasty, said Thomas Kohnen, MD, PhD. It also can be used to provide reversible presbyopia correction. (modernmedicine.com)
  • cloudiness
  • When a cataract is small, the cloudiness affects only a small part of the lens. (nih.gov)
  • Cataracts vary from extremely small areas of cloudiness to large opaque areas that cause a noticeable loss of vision. (aoa.org)
  • opaque
  • It is only when the opaque lens fibres reach the stage of significantly interfering with the vision that the name 'cataract' is applied. (springer.com)
  • Until the mid 1700s cataracts were believed to be caused by the flow of opaque materials into the eye. (everything2.com)
  • vision
  • How do cataracts affect vision? (nih.gov)
  • Cataracts tend to "grow" slowly, so vision gets worse gradually. (nih.gov)
  • If you are one of the more than 24 million Americans living with cataracts, your vision can dull over time and could impact your ability to see not only details, but also the brightness and vividness of colors. (mycataracts.com)
  • A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye which leads to a decrease in vision . (wikipedia.org)
  • Poor vision caused by cataracts may also result in an increased risk of falling and depression . (wikipedia.org)
  • However, if the lens is clouded by a cataract, light is scattered so the lens can no longer focus it properly, causing vision problems. (aoa.org)
  • In age-related cataracts, changes in vision can be very gradual. (aoa.org)
  • Visual acuity measurement to determine to what extent a cataract may be limiting clear distance and near vision. (aoa.org)
  • Eventually, this cataract impairs vision, once it has become large enough. (news-medical.net)
  • Some indications that a cataract may be forming include blurred or hazy vision, decreased color perception, or the feeling of having a film over the eyes. (aoa.org)
  • When completed, eyeglasses or contact lenses may be prescribed to provide the most effective post-cataract vision. (aoa.org)
  • These cataracts can exist in isolation or in any combination with each other, and each can cause a wide spectrum of vision problems, from unnoticeable to blinding. (britannica.com)
  • If the opacity is severe enough to affect vision, it is called a cataract. (britannica.com)
  • Although most people develop cataracts in both eyes, they do not usually progress at the same rate, so that the person has much better vision in one eye than in the other. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cataract was associated with approximately 50 percent of cases of low vision. (uptodate.com)
  • Vision loss from cataracts frequently results in patients tripping and falling over objects that they could not see. (docshop.com)
  • Although many cataracts are not significant enough to require treatment, surgical removal of cataracts is usually safe and effective, resulting in improvement of vision. (medicinenet.com)
  • extraction
  • This approach is contrasted with intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE), an older procedure in which the surgeon removed the complete lens within its capsule and left the eye aphakic (without a lens). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The first extracapsular extraction of a cataract was performed by a French surgeon named Jacques Daviel in 1753. (encyclopedia.com)
  • After von Graefe, however, intracapsular extraction gradually became the favored method of cataract removal even though it left the patient without a lens inside the eye. (encyclopedia.com)
  • a cataract occurring in the retained lens or capsule after a cataract extraction. (drugs.com)
  • occur
  • A cataract can occur in either or both eyes. (nih.gov)
  • Most cataracts develop in people over age 55, but they occasionally occur in infants and young children. (aoa.org)
  • Cataracts occur in 50 percent of people between the ages of 65 and 74 and in 70 percent of people over the age of 75. (britannica.com)
  • search
  • This information was developed by the National Eye Institute to help patients and their families search for general information about cataracts. (nih.gov)
  • world's
  • Citing various encyclopedias, reference books, and webpages accessible through Google, Gocta Cataracts are unofficially listed as the world's fifth-tallest, after adding Ramnefjellsfossen ( Norway ) and Mongefossen (Norway). (wikipedia.org)
  • patient
  • in the same year, a British ophthalmologist named Harold Ridley implanted the first IOL in the eye of a cataract patient. (encyclopedia.com)
  • While participating in an ORBIS Flying Eye Hospital program in Trujillo, Peru, and operating on an elderly patient with a dense cataract under peribulbar anesthesia, James Lehmann, MD, encountered iris prolapse as soon as he made the paracentesis. (modernmedicine.com)
  • A droplet cataract seen in a patient with galactosaemia. (mrcophth.com)
  • Radiation
  • Cataracts can arise as an effect of exposure to various types of radiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies show an increased chance of cataract formation with unprotected exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. (aoa.org)
  • Excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation present in sunlight, cigarette smoking or the use of certain medications are also risk factors for the development of cataracts. (aoa.org)
  • Cataracts can also be caused by metabolic changes, injury , radiation or toxic chemical s. (everything2.com)
  • Airline pilots have an increased risk of nuclear cataracts [common type of cataract, associated with aging] compared with non-pilots, and that risk is associated with cumulative exposure to cosmic radiation, according to a study in the August issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (rxpgnews.com)
  • pupil
  • Cataract cannot usually be seen on casual inspection because it is happening in the lens which is just behind the iris and the pupil aperture. (everything2.com)
  • formation
  • Several studies show increased cataract formation in patients with higher alcohol consumption compared with people who have lower or no alcohol consumption. (aoa.org)
  • Although the results are inconclusive, studies suggest an association between cataract formation and low levels of antioxidants (for example, vitamin C, vitamin E and carotenoids). (aoa.org)
  • The major advances in the surgical treatment of cataract in the last century have not been matched by advances in the understanding of cataract formation, in approaches to prevention, or in nonsurgical therapy. (uptodate.com)
  • younger
  • Cataracts most often develop in persons over the age of 55, but they are also occasionally found in younger people, including newborns. (aoa.org)